IC 1005 = NGC 5607 = UGC 9189 = MCG +12-14-001 = CGCG 337-007 = Mrk 286 = VII Zw 547 = PGC 51182

14 19 26.7 +71 35 17; UMi

V = 13.4;  Size 0.9'x0.8';  Surf Br = 12.8

 

17.5" (7/10/99): fairly faint, fairly small, round, 0.8' diameter, gradually increases to a small bright core and stellar nucleus at moments with concentration.  The galaxy is bracketed by two mag 13-14 stars 2.8' WSW and 2.2' ENE.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1005 = Sw. VII-44 on 7 Jun 1888 and reported "F; S; R; BM."  There is nothing at his position but ~1.0 min of RA east is NGC 5607 and his description is appropriate.  This galaxy was discovered by William Herschel in 1785.  So, IC 1005 = NGC 5607.  Most sources identify this galaxy was NGC 5607 only and ignore the IC designation.

******************************

 

IC 1013 = MCG +04-34-030 = CGCG 133-060 = WBL 509-001 = AWM 3-3 = PGC 51643

14 27 50.8 +25 50 17; Boo

V = 14.2;  Size 0.9'x0.5';  PA = 96°

 

17.5" (5/11/96): very faint, fairly small, round, very weak concentration, 40" diameter.  Located 5.8' WSW of NGC 5629 and 4' SW of IC 1017.  Faintest of 5 in a group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1013 = J. 1-291, along with IC 1017, on 16 Jun 1892.  His published offsets match CGCG 133-060, though Dreyer made a 1 degree error in north polar distance in the IC 1.  Javelle caught the errorn and noted it at the end of his third catalogue (Erratum au Premier Catalogue).  Dreyer included the correction in the IC 2 Notes.  Wolfgang Steinicke misidentified LEDA 214272 as IC 1013 and this error was repeated by Corwin and loaded into NED.  MCG, CGCG, PGC and HyperLEDA fail to identify CGCG 133-060 as IC 1013, probably due to the original IC error.

******************************

 

IC 1014 = UGC 9275 = MCG +02-37-012 = CGCG 075-045 = PGC 51685

14 28 18.4 +13 46 49; Boo

V = 12.5;  Size 2.7'x2.0';  Surf Br = 14.2;  PA = 90°

 

17.5" (6/8/02): very faint, fairly large, slightly elongated ~E-W, perhaps 2.5'x2.0'. Appears a diffuse, ill-defined glow with a weak central brightening.  The halo appears to fade into the background, so difficult to judge extent.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1014 = Sf 78 on 27 Apr 1867 with the 18.5-inch refractor at the Dearborn Observatory and noted "F, pL, R, vgbM."  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1015 = VV 717 = I Zw 90 = CGCG 104-031 = MCG +03-37-018 = PGC 51686

14 28 19.2 +15 25 12; Boo

Size 0.7'x0.4'

 

48" (5/16/12): fairly small, irregular glow with several components extending ~0.7' SW-NE.  The southwest component was faint, small, elongated 2:1 SW-NE.  The two northeast components were connected as a fairly faint, small glow, elongated SW-NE.  The east member had a quasi-stellar core.

 

Fritz Zwicky described this object as an "Interconnected post-eruptive blue pair of galaxies with several knots and jets."

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1015 = J. 292 on 28 Jun 1892 .   His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1016 = IC 4424 = NGC 5619B = MCG +01-37-014 = CGCG 047-048 = KTG 57C = Holm 645b = WBL 507-003 = PGC 51624

14 27 32.4 +04 49 18; Vir

V = 14.1;  Size 0.9'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.6

 

See observing notes for IC 4424.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1016 = Sw. X-26 on 28 Apr 1891 and reported "vF; vS; R; f[ollowing] of [NGC] 5619."  There is nothing at his position, but 1.3 minutes of RA west is IC 4424, found by Bigourdan on 23 May 1892.  Bigourdan measured an accurate position, so his designation is used in most modern sources and IC 1016 has been discarded, although it should be the primary one.  RNGC calls this galaxy NGC 5619B, adding to the confusion.

******************************

 

IC 1017 = UGC 9276 = MCG +04-34-032 = CGCG 133-062 = AWM 3-2 = PGC 51668

14 28 07.2 +25 52 08; Boo

V = 13.7;  Size 1.0'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 128°

 

17.5" (5/11/96): fairly faint, small, elongated 2:1 NW-SE, 45"x25", bright core.  A mag 12 star is 1.1' WSW.  This galaxy is located 2.4' NW of NGC 5629 and is the second brightest in a group of 5 galaxies in field including IC 1013 4' SW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1017 = J. I-293, along with IC 1013, on 16 Jun 1892 with the 30-inch refractor at the Nice Observatory.  His position matches UGC 9276.  I'm surprised JH didn't pick up this relatively bright galaxy in his two observations of NGC 5629.

******************************

 

IC 1019 = MCG +04-34-033 = CGCG 133-064 = AWM 3-4 = PGC 51667

14 28 13.5 +25 56 51; Boo

V = 14.0;  Size 0.8'x0.5'

 

17.5" (5/11/96): faint, small, round, 20" diameter.  A mag 13 star lies 25" W of center.  Located 6.0' N of NGC 5629 and 9' NW of a mag 7 star within a small group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1019 = J. 1-295 on 28 Jul 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1020 = UGC 9289 = MCG +04-34-035 = CGCG 133-068 = PGC 51728

14 28 49.5 +26 01 56; Boo

V = 14.1;  Size 1.2'x0.3';  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 176°

 

17.5" (5/11/96): faint, small, elongated 2:1 N-S, very small bright core.  A mag 13 star lies 0.9' NW of center.  Located 13' NE of NGC 5629 and last of 5 in field.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1020 = J. 1-296 on 28 Jul 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1026 = NGC 5653 = UGC 9318 = MCG +05-34-058 = CGCG 163-068 = LGG 383-002 = PGC 51814

14 30 10.6 +31 12 54; Boo

V = 12.2;  Size 1.7'x1.3';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 125°

 

See observing notes for NGC 5653.

 

Truman Safford found IC 1026 = Sf. 13 on 11 May 1866 and simply noted "pretty bright".  There is nothing at his position but 1 minute of RA west is NGC 5653 and his description is appropriate for an 18.5" refractor.  Safford made several other 1 minute errors in his RA positions, including  IC 1030, and IC 1008.  C 1026 = NGC 5653.

******************************

 

IC 1027 = UGC 9331 = MCG +09-4-009 = CGCG 273-008 = PGC 51796

14 29 48.5 +53 57 54; Boo

V = 14.1;  Size 0.9'x0.8';  PA = 0°

 

24" (7/1/19): at 322x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 35" diameter, nearly even surface brightness.  IC 1027 is the brightest in a group with LEDA 2456695, situated just 1.7' N (at the same redshift).  It occasionally "popped" as an extremely small glow using averted vision, so was marginally glimpsed at V = 16.2.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1027 = Sw. VII-45 on 23 Jul 1887 and recorded "eeeF; pS; R; another or a few F st. nr."  His position was just off the south side of UGC 9331 so the identification is certain. In 1900, Howe reported "Swift suspected 'another near'. I saw no nebula near by, but there is a star of mag 13, which was 0.7' south preceding."

******************************

 

IC 1028 = NGC 5739 = UGC 9486 = MCG +07-30-052 = CGCG 220-049 = PGC 52531

14 42 28.9 +41 50 32; Boo

V = 12.1;  Size 2.3'x2.1';  Surf Br = 13.6

 

See observing notes for NGC 5739.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1028 = Sw. VIII-81 on 1 Sep 1888 and reported "pB; S; R; F * close nf."  There is nothing at his position, but all modern catalogues identify IC 1028 = UGC 9368 (first given in the CGCG).  This galaxy is situated 15' SE of Swift's position.  But in August 2017, I noticed that IC 895 likely had 10 minute error in RA, so that IC 895 = NGC 5273, and Harold Corwin followed this lead and found IC 1028 (as well as IC 1045), also discovered on 1 Sep 1888, shared the same 10 minute error in RA.  The corrected position lands on the north edge of NGC 5739, and this galaxy has a 14th magnitude star off the northeast edge, matching the description.  This galaxy was originally discovered by William Herschel on 18 Mar 1787.

******************************

 

IC 1029 = UGC 9361 = MCG +08-26-041 = PGC 51955

14 32 27.2 +49 54 13; Boo

V = 11.3;  Size 2.8'x0.5';  Surf Br = 11.6;  PA = 152°

 

17.5" (6/24/95): moderately bright, edge-on 5:1 NNW-SSE, 2.0'x0.4'.  Contains a very small and round prominent core with a faint stellar nucleus at moments.  Located 3.2' W of a mag 9.5 star.  This is an unusual situation with a brighter IC galaxy (discovered by William Herschel) in the field of a fainter NGC galaxy (discovered by John Herschel).

 

William Herschel discovered IC 1029 = H II-696 = Big. 185 on 15 May 1787 (sweep 736) and recorded "pB, S, E."  His position matches UGC 9361.  This galaxy is the brighter of a pair of edge-ons with fainter UGC 9347 9.6' NW.  When JH observed the field, he picked up UGC 9347, measured the position accurately (mentioning the star at the edge), but assumed it was his father's II-696.  JH used his position for h1838 in the GC and Dreyer followed in the NGC (NGC 5673 = h1838, but not H II-696).

 

When Bigourdan observed the pair of galaxies on 14 Jun 1887, he assumed UGC 9361 was new, measured an accurate position, and Dreyer catalogued Big. 185 as IC 1029.  This is an unusual situation where an IC object was discovered earlier by WH!  Note:  Malcolm Thomson argues in his IC identification notes that NGC 5673 = IC 1029.  See NGC 5673 for more.

******************************

 

IC 1030 = NGC 5672 = UGC 9354 = MCG +05-34-068 = CGCG 163-077 = LGG 383-003 = PGC 51964

14 32 38.3 +31 40 12; Boo

V = 13.5;  Size 0.9'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 50°

 

See observing notes for NGC 5672.

 

Truman Safford found IC 1030 = Sf. 6 on 5 May 1866.  There is nothing at his position but 1 minute of RA west is NGC 5672, an error made by Safford on several other discoveries.  So, likely IC 1030 = NGC 5672.  Harold Corwin made this identification.

******************************

 

IC 1031 = CGCG 248-005 = WBL 515-001 = PGC 52082

14 34 24.0 +48 02 15; Boo

V = 14.4;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  PA = 56°

 

24" (6/15/15): faint to fairly faint, small, elongated 3:2 SW-NE, 0.3'x0.2'.  A mag 15.2 star lies 40" NE.  First of 3 (WBL 515) with IC 1032 4.9' SE and IC 1033 6.7' SE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1031 = Sw. VII-46 on 6 May 1888 and recorded "eeeF; S; R; nearly pointed to by 2 D st., 1st of 3 [with IC 1032 and 1033]."  His RA was 12 seconds too large (copied into the IC), but the identification is certain.  Howe measured an accurate position in his series of NGC/IC observations around 1900.

******************************

 

IC 1032 = CGCG 248-006 = I Zw 91 = WBL 515-002 = PGC 52097

14 34 39.5 +47 58 05; Boo

V = 14.4;  Size 0.5'x0.4'

 

24" (6/15/15): fairly faint, small, round, 20" diameter, fairly high surface brightness.  Second of three with IC 1033 1.9' SSE and IC 1031 4.9' NW.

 

18" (7/15/07): faint, very small, irregularly round, 20"x15", occasional faint stellar nucleus.  Forms a pair with slightly brighter IC 1033 just 2' S.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1032 = Sw. VII-47 on 6 May 1888 and recorded "eeeF; S; R; 2nd of 3 [with IC 1031 and 1033]."  On the SDSS, this is a merged double system with two nuclei (PGC 52097 + PGC 4126489).

******************************

 

IC 1033 = CGCG 248-007 = WBL 515-003 = PGC 52099

14 34 41.8 +47 56 16; Boo

V = 14.0;  Size 0.9'x0.8'

 

24" (6/15/15): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, bright core, 25" diameter.  Slightly larger and brighter of a pair with IC 1033 1.9' NNW and IC 1031 6.7' NW forming a triplet.

 

18" (7/15/07): faint, small, round, 25" diameter, weak concentration.  Brighter of a pair with IC 1032 2' N.  Forms the vertex of a right angle with a mag 13 star 2.6' S and a mag 12 star 5' E.

 

These two small galaxies were picked up in the same field (10' apart) while viewing 7th magnitude C/2006 VZ13 (LINEAR) in the same field of view!  IC 1031 is located just 6.7' NW but missed viewing as it was outside of the field.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1033 = Sw. VII-48 on 6 May 1888 and recorded "eeF; pS; R; 3rd of 3 [with IC 1031 and 1032]."  His position is just 5 seconds too large in RA.

******************************

 

IC 1039 = CGCG 047-133 = WBL 518-002 = PGC 52428

14 40 29.4 +03 25 58; Vir

V = 14.7;  Size 0.6'x0.3';  PA = 43°

 

24" (6/18/12): faint, very small, slightly elongated SW-NE, 15" diameter.  Located 3.7' SW of NGC 5718 in the core of the galaxy group MKW 8.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1039 = J. 1-306, along with IC 1041, 1042 and 1043, on 28 May 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1041 = MCG +01-37-045 = CGCG 047-134 = WBL 518-004 = PGC 52434

14 40 37.9 +03 22 37; Vir

V = 13.9;  Size 0.8'x0.6';  PA = 165°

 

24" (6/18/12): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 4:3 NNW-SSE, well concentrated with a small bright core.  Forms a close pair with IC 1043 1.4' E. Located 5.5' S of NGC 5718/IC 1042 in the MKW 8 cluster.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1041 = J. 1-308 = Sw. 10A-6 = Sw. XI-173, along with IC 1039, 1042 and 1043, on 28 May 1891.  His dec is ~1.5' too far south but the identification is certain.   Lewis Swift found it again on 17 May 1892 and noted Sw. 10A-6 as "eF, vS, lE.  1st of 3 [with IC 1042 and NGC 5718]."  Swift reobserved it again on 16 Sep 1896 from Echo Mountain in Southern California and reported it as new in his 11th discovery list with a slightly modified position, probably to make sure Dreyer didn't miss this discovery. Dreyer assumed Swift's observation referred to IC 1039, but since his declination was 6' south of IC 1042, it probably refers to IC 1041.

******************************

 

IC 1042 = Arp 171 NED1 = UGC 9457 = MCG +01-37-046 = WBL 518-003 = PGC 52433

14 40 39.0 +03 28 10; Vir

V = 13.3;  Size 1.1'x1.1';  Surf Br = 13.3

 

24" (6/18/12): fairly faint, fairly small, round, 24" diameter, weak concentration.  Fainter member of a double system (Arp 171) with NGC 5718 at the WSW edge (haloes virtually in contact.

 

17.5" (6/8/91): very faint, very small, low even surface brightness.  Forms a double system (Arp 171) just off the WNW edge of NGC 5718.  Member of the poor cluster MKW 8

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1042 = J. I-309 = Sw. 10A-7 = Sw. XI-174, along with IC 1039, 1041 and 1043, on 28 May 1891 and recorded "vF, R, 10" diameter, brighter center."  In a footnote he mentioned "distinct from NGC 5718".  Lewis Swift independently discovered the galaxy on 17 May 1892 and noted Sw. 10A-7 as "eeF, S, R, close D with 5718."  Swift reobserved it again on 16 Sep 1896 from Echo Mountain in Southern California and reported it as new in his 11th discovery list, probably to make sure Dreyer didn't miss this discovery.

******************************

 

IC 1043 = LEDA 2800989

14 40 43.4 +03 22 26; Vir

V = 14.8;  Size 0.6'x0.3';  PA = 22°

 

24" (6/18/12): faint, very small, slightly elongated SSW-NNE, 15"x10", faint stellar nucleus with direct vision.  Located 1.4' E of IC 1041 in the core of the NGC 5718 group (MKW 8). This galaxy is not identified as IC 1043 in Megastar or HyperLeda and is not listed in the original PGC.  This galaxy is not identified as IC 1043 in Megastar or HyperLeda and is not listed in the original PGC.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1043 = J. 310, along with IC 1039, 1041 and 1042, on 28 May 1891.  His dec is nearly 2' too far south (same as IC 1041).

******************************

 

IC 1045 = UGC 9559 = MCG +07-30-068 = CGCG 220-058 = CGCG 221-001 = Mrk 827 = Holm 683a = PGC 52995

14 50 39.4 +42 44 27; Boo

V = 13.7;  Size 1.1'x0.4';  PA = 150°

 

24" (7/1/19): at 375x; fairly faint, moderately large, elongated 5:2 NW-SE, ~1.0'x0.4', bright elongated core.  CGCG 220-059, just 1.8' NNE, appeared faint, small, round, 15" diameter.  Both galaxies are within the outline of a triangle of mag 10/11/12 stars.

 

UGC 9542, located 25' SW, appeared fairly faint, moderately large, very thin edge-on, 1.0'x0.25', fairly low nearly even surface brightness.

 

24" (6/3/19): at 322x; UGC 9559 (recently identified as IC 1045) appeared fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 or 5:2 NW-SE, ~40"x16", brighter core.  At the center of a triangle with a mag 9.7 star 5.9' WSW, a mag 11 star 4' SE and a mag 12 star 3.6' NNE.

 

Forms a physical pair of Markarian galaxies with CGCG 220-059 1.8' NNE.  The companion was very faint and small, round, 12"-15" diameter.

 

NED equates IC 1045 with NGC 5731, described below.

17.5" (6/27/98): faint, moderately large, very elongated NW-SE, 1.0'x0.25', weakly concentrated.  A mag 13 star lies 1.5' NW of center.  Forms a close pair of edge-ons with NGC 5730 3' SW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1045 = Sw. VIII-82 on 1 Sep 1888 and reported "eeeF; pS; R; nearly bet. 2 st.; forms triangle with 2 st; eee diff." There is nothing at his position, but 7' WNW is NGC 5731 and Harold Corwin originally considered this galaxy as a candidate for IC 1045.  This identification implies Swift didn't notice NGC 5730, which is in the same field and equally as bright.

 

But in August 2017, Harold Corwin followed up on my suggestion that Swift made a 10 minute error in RA in the position of IC 895 and found that the same 10 minute correction applied to IC 1045 as well as IC 1028 (both discovered on the same night), resulted in IC 1045 = UGC 9559.  No modern catalogues (yet) make this identification.  Courtney Seligman additionally found that IC 511, the 4th object discovered that night by Swift, shares the same 10 minute error!

******************************

 

IC 1046 = MCG +12-14-011 = CGCG 337-017 = PGC 52284

14 37 53.4 +69 00 52; UMi

Size 0.8'x0.4';  PA = 87°

 

24" (7/1/19): at 225x and 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 or 2:1 E-W, small brighter nucleus.  Mottled, irregular appearance, ~36"x20".  A ~20" pair of mag 11.7/13.2 stars is 3' E (nearly collinear with the galaxy).

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1046 = Sw. VII-49 on 11 Jun 1888 and reported "eF; S; R; D * nr f[ollowing] points to it."  His position is within 30" of CGCG 337-017 = PGC 52284 and the double star is 3.5' E.

******************************

 

IC 1047 = MCG +03-37-038 = CGCG 104-071 = CGCG 105-004 = PGC 52522

14 42 19.9 +19 11 31; Boo

V = 14.7;  Size 0.6'x0.5'

 

18" (7/10/10): at 285x appeared very faint, small, round, 20" diameter, low surface halo surrounding a brighter core.  Located 5' S of a mag 11 star.  Collinear with three mag 13-13.5 stars extending to the NE with the closest 1.6' NE. A compact group of extremely faint galaxies lies 4' S of IC 1047 and the combined glow (or the brightest galaxy) was just visible.  NGC 5737 lies 22' SE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1047 = J. 313 on 18 May 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1049 = UGC 9461 = MCG +10-21-021 = CGCG 296-016 = PGC 52379

14 39 33.1 +62 00 11; Dra

V = 13.9;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  PA = 70°

 

24" (7/1/19): at 225x and 375x; moderately bright and large, roundish, ~45"-50" diameter, increases gradually and mildly to the center.  A mag 10.4 star is 4.7' SSW and a mag 11.1 star is 4.4' ENE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1049 = Sw. IX-41 on 2 Jul 1889 and reported "eeF; pS; R; nearly bet. 2 distant wide D st."  The wide double stars are NE and S.

******************************

 

IC 1051 = CGCG 105-012 = PGC 52629

14 44 11.6 +19 01 13; Boo

V = 14.3;  Size 0.7'x0.6'

 

18" (7/10/10): very faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  Located 16' NE of NGC 5737 and 18' NW of mag 6.2 HD 130025.  A line of three mag 13 stars aligned E-W lies 4' N.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1051 = J. 315 on 18 Jul 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1056 = IC 1057 = UGC 9516 = MCG +08-27-023 = CGCG 273-025 = PGC 52713

14 45 49.0 +50 23 39; Boo

V = 13.3;  Size 1.8'x1.3';  Surf Br = 14.1;  PA = 20°

 

24" (7/11/18): at 200x and 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, 1' diameter, slightly elongated ~N-S, low surface brightness outer halo increases with averted, brighter core has a broad, weak concentration towards the center.  Situated between a mag 10.5 star 2.6' W and a mag 7.8 star 6.6' E.  Three additional mag 10 stars are within 7' to the SW.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1056 = Sw. VII-50 on 4 Jul 1888 and reported, "eeF, L, R; forms an arc of a small circle with 2 sts; 3 pB sts nr sf in form of arc of a large circle."  His position was just off the west edge of this galaxy.  Swift first discovered this galaxy on 8 Apr 1888, but his description for IC 1057 differed and the position was 3' off, so he assumed they were different.  But IC 1056 = IC 1057.  The higher number should be the primary based on historical precedence.

******************************

 

IC 1057 = IC 1056 = UGC 9516 = MCG +08-27-023 = CGCG 273-025 = PGC 52713

14 45 49.0 +50 23 39; Boo

V = 13.3;  Size 1.8'x1.3';  Surf Br = 14.1;  PA = 20°

 

24" (7/11/18): at 200x and 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, 1' diameter, slightly elongated ~N-S, low surface brightness outer halo increases with averted, brighter core has a broad, weak concentration towards the center.  Situated between a mag 10.5 star 2.6' W and a mag 7.8 star 6.6' E.  Three additional mag 10 stars are within 7' to the SW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1057 = Sw. VII-51 on 8 Apr 1888 and reported "eF; pS; R; bet a pB* and a coarse D *, nearer the latter.  His position is 2.3' too far SE.  He rediscovered the galaxy on July 4th and it was recatalogued as IC 1056 with a more accurate position.  Neither Swift nor Dreyer caught the equivalence as the descriptions and positions are enough different.

******************************

 

IC 1060 = MCG -01-38-004 = PGC 53075

14 51 47.3 -07 13 57; Lib

V = 13.6;  Size 1.5'x0.8';  PA = 92°

 

18" (7/24/11): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 WNW-ESE, ~32"x22", broad weak concentration to the center but no distinct core or nucleus.  Located 20' W of a 1.4' pair of mag 9 stars. MCG -01-38-006 lies 23' NE.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1060 = Sf 106 on 23 May 1868 with the 18.5-inch refractor at the Dearborn Observatory.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1062 = MCG +03-38-041 = CGCG 105-047 = PGC 53044

14 51 17.7 +18 41 13; Boo

V = 14.3;  Size 0.3'x0.2';  PA = 100°

 

17.5" (6/7/97): faint, small, round, 20" diameter, low even surface brightness.  View hampered by mag 7.5 SAO 101247 just 2.2' S!  Located 25' S of Xi Boo (V = 4.6).

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1062 = J. 321 on 18 Jul 1892.  CGCG doesn't label this galaxy as IC 1062.

******************************

 

IC 1065 = UGC 9553 = MCG +11-18-008 = CGCG 318-004 = PGC 52924

14 49 21.6 +63 16 14; Dra

V = 13.6;  Size 0.8'x0.7';  PA = 89°

 

18" (7/10/10): faint, very small, 15" diameter.  Appears to have an extremely low surface brightness halo increasing the diameter to 30".  Located 14' SE of Stein 775 = 11.5/12.0 at 9".

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1065 = Sw. VII-52 on 7 Apr 1888 and recorded "vF, pS, R."  His position is just off the south side of the galaxy. Identified in the MCG only as +11-18-008.

******************************

 

IC 1066 = UGC 9573 = MCG +01-38-009 = PGC 53176

14 53 02.9 +03 17 44; Vir

V = 13.1;  Size 1.2'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 70°

 

48" (4/19/17): bright, moderately large, oval 5:3 WSW-ENE, ~0.8'x0.5'.  Contains a small, very bright nucleus.  A mag 11 star is 1.8' E, a mag 12.5 star is 1.2' ESE and a mag 16.6 star lies 0.9' N.  Forms a bright pair with IC 1067 2.2' NNE. 

 

24" (6/23/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:3 WSW-ENE, ~40"x24".  Occasionally appears slightly brighter along the major axis.  An 11th mag star is 2' E with a 13th mag star is 1.3' ESE.  Forms a nice pair with IC 1067 2.3' NNE.

 

17.5" (6/18/93): faint, small, elongated 4:3 WSW-ENE, almost even surface brightness, weak concentration.  A wide pair of mag 11 and 13 stars at 40" separation are about 1.5' ESE.  Forms a close pair with IC 1067 2.2' NNE.  In the same 140x field (using a 14mm Nagler) with NGC 5774 and 5775 20' NE.

 

R.J. Mitchell discovered IC 1066 = J. 1-324, along with IC 1067, on 16 May 1855 using LdR's 72".  He assumed he was observing the double system NGC 5765, but his description and sketch clearly refers to the IC pair.  He recorded "2 neb with 3 B st near, both F, bM.  The north one has a double star close sp, and is E np sf; the s one is perhaps also slightly E sp nf."  A diagram in the 1880 publication is a perfect match with IC 1066 and IC 1067 (close northeast of a double star).  The pair of galaxies was found again on 3 May 1856 while searching for NGC 5775!  Dreyer realized that Mitchell's pair was different than NGC 5775, but without a position he wasn't able to include it in the NGC.

 

Stephane Javelle found the galaxy again on 28 May 1891, measured an accurate position, and it was catalogued as IC 1066.  Javelle is credited in the IC, as the connection with the Birr Castle sketch was never made.

******************************

 

IC 1067 = UGC 9574 = MCG +01-38-010 = PGC 53178

14 53 05.4 +03 19 53; Vir

V = 12.2;  Size 2.2'x1.7';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 110°

 

48" (4/19/17): bright, moderately large, slightly elongated NW-SE, ~1.0' diameter.  Contains a very bright very small nucleus.  I didn't notice the bar structure in a quick observation.  An easy 9" pair of mag 15-15.5 stars is on the southwest side.  Forms a 2.2' pair with IC 1066 to the SSW with the NGC 5774/5775 18' NE.  A mag 16.6 star lies 1.3' SSW, nearly on a direct line between IC 1066 and IC 1077.

 

24" (6/23/17): at 375x; moderately bright, fairly small, roundish, ~45" diameter.  Contains a very small brighter nucleus embedded in a "bar" that was often seen oriented NW-SE.  A 15th mag star is superimposed at the west edge.  Brighter of a nice pair with IC 1066 2.2' SSW.  Two mag 11 and 13 stars lies 2.5' E and a similar distance southeast.

 

17.5" (6/18/93): slightly larger and brighter of close pair with IC 1066 2.2' SSW.  Fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated NW-SE, 1.0'x0.8', bright core.  A mag 12 star is 2.7' ESE.  Prominent for an IC pair.

 

R.J. Mitchell discovered IC 1067 = J. 1-325, along with IC 1066, on 16 May 1855 using LdR's 72".  See the story under IC 1066.

******************************

 

IC 1069 = UGC 9563 = MCG +09-24-044 = CGCG 273-029 = PGC 53000

14 50 46.5 +54 24 40; Boo

V = 13.8;  Size 1.3'x0.7';  PA = 50°

 

24" (7/10/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 4:3 SW-NE, ~40"x30", sharply concentrated with a very small bright nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1069 = Sw. VII-53 on 8 Apr 1888 and reported "pF; vS; R; in vacancy."  His position is 3' too far southeast, but there are no other nearby galaxies so the identification is certain.

******************************

 

IC 1070 = CGCG 048-059 = WBL 532-002 = PGC 53245

14 53 51.3 +03 29 05; Vir

V = 15.0;  Size 0.7'x0.3';  PA = 121°

 

48" (4/19/17): moderately bright, fairly small, oval 3:2 NW-SE, brighter core but no sharp nucleus.  Located 4' SSW of NGC 5775, which forms a striking pair with NGC 5774.

 

24" (6/23/17): at 375x; faint, very small, slightly elongated NW-SE, 15"x12", weak concentration.  Located 4' SSW of NGC 5775.

 

24" (7/14/15): at 375x; faint to fairly faint (visible continuously), small, elongated 3:2 NW-SE, 18"x12".  By far the faintest and smallest in a trio with NGC 5774 3.9' NE and NGC 5774 6.3' NNW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1070 = J. 1-327 on 3 Jun 1891 with the 30-inch refractor at the Nice Observatory and recorded "vF, S, R, diffic."

******************************

 

IC 1071 = UGC 9582 = MCG +01-38-015 = CGCG 048-062 = PGC 53260

14 54 12.5 +04 45 00; Vir

V = 13.2;  Size 1.0'x0.8';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 150°

 

18" (6/17/04): brightest and furthest south of a collinear trio with IC 1072 5.5' N and IC 1073 2.7' N.  Appears fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated NNW-SSE, 0.8'x0.6'.  A mag 12 star lies 4.8' NW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1071 = Sw. X-27 on 25 Jun 1891 and logged "eF; S; R; BM."  His position is 2' too far south.  Swift missed nearby IC 1072 and IC 1073 to the north, which Javelle discovered the following year.  Howe reported a corrected position in his series of NGC/IC observation in Monthly Notices.

******************************

 

IC 1072 = MCG +01-38-016 = CGCG 048-064 = PGC 53258

14 54 13.1 +04 50 29; Vir

V = 14.2;  Size 0.6'x0.4'

 

18" (6/17/04): faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 0.5'x0.4', fairly smooth surface brightness.  In a collinear triplet (second brightest) with IC 1071 5.5' S and IC 1073 2.8' S.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1072 = J. 328, along with IC 1073, on 18 May 1892 .

******************************

 

IC 1073 = CGCG 048-063 = PGC 53259

14 54 14.4 +04 47 40; Vir

V = 14.9;  Size 0.5'x0.4'

 

18" (6/17/04): faintest of a collinear triplet with IC 1071 2.7' S and IC 1072 2.8' N.  Very faint, very small, round, 20" diameter, low surface brightness and requires averted.  A mag 12 star lies 4' due west.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1073 = J. 329, along with IC 1072, on 18 May 1892

******************************

 

IC 1074 = UGC 9572 = MCG +09-24-047 = CGCG 273-030 = PGC 53084

14 51 57.3 +51 15 54; Boo

V = 14.2;  Size 1.0'x0.4';  PA = 117°

 

24" (7/10/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 NW-SE, ~40"x20", slightly brighter core.  A mag 12.7 star is 1.7' W, a mag 14.4 star is 1' SSW and a mag 9.5 star is 3.4' SW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1074 = Sw. VII-54 on 4 Jul 1888 and recorded "eeF; S; R."  His position is just off the north edge of the galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1075 = UGC 9593 = MCG +03-38-053 = CGCG 105-069 = WBL 535-001 = PGC 53314

14 54 49.2 +18 06 21; Boo

V = 14.1;  Size 1.2'x0.6';  PA = 155°

 

24" (7/11/18): at 282x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:3 NNW-SSE, ~40"x24", weak concentration, fairly low surface brightness.  In a trio (WBL 535) with IC 1076 4.8' SSE and CGCG 105-073 5.4' ENE.  The CGCG (background galaxy at over twice the redshift) appeared extremely faint, very small, round, 15" diameter, low surface brightness.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1075 = Sw. VII-83, along with IC 1076, on 22 Apr 1889.  He reported "eeeF; pS; R; p of 2 [with IC 1076]."

******************************

 

IC 1076 = UGC 9595 = Mrk 479 = MCG +03-38-055 = CGCG 105-071 = SBL 535-002 = PGC 53320

14 54 59.6 +18 02 14; Boo

V = 13.7;  Size 0.9'x0.5';  PA = 9°

 

24" (7/11/18): at 282x; moderately bright, fairly small, elongated 5:3 SSW-NNE, ~45"x25", brighter core.  Brightest in a quartet with IC 1075 4.8' NNW and CGCG 105-073 5.8' NNE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1076 = Sw. VIII-84, along with IC 1075, on 22 Apr 1889.  He reported "eeeF; pS; R; in vacancy; pB * sp; f of 2 [with IC 1075]."  Stephane Javelle found it again on 13 Jun 1892 and reported it as new (J. 1-330), with comments "faint, round, 30" diameter, central condensation."

******************************

 

IC 1077 = ESO 581-0029 = MCG -03-38-030 = PGC 53450

14 57 21.7 -19 12 50; Lib

V = 12.6;  Size 1.4'x1.1';  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 135°

 

17.5": fairly faint, fairly small, roundish, 1.1' diameter, very weak even concentration.  A mag 13.5 star lies 2.4' SW.  Located 20' WNW of NGC 5791 in the group LGG 389.  This is a relatively bright IC galaxy.

 

Frank Muller discovered IC 1077 = LM(S) 676, along with IC 1081, on 18 Mar 1887 at the Leander McCormick Observatory.  His micrometric offset in RA matches ESO 581-002 (no measurement in declination).  Howe measured an accurate position in 1898, though the IC position is 5' too far south.

******************************

 

IC 1078 = UGC 9608 = MCG +02-38-025 = CGCG 076-102 = WBL 536-001 = PGC 53411

14 56 29.0 +09 21 16; Boo

V = 14.0;  Size 1.0'x0.8';  PA = 13°

 

24" (7/14/15): faint, fairly small, round, 30" diameter, low surface brightness.  Forms a nice pair with IC 1079 2.0' NE.  UGC 9616 = VV 26 lies 7.7' SE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1078 = J. 1-331, along with IC 1079, on 17 May 1892 and recorded "pF, vS, R, lbM."

******************************

 

IC 1079 = UGC 9611 = MCG +02-38-026 = CGCG 076-103 = WBL 536-002 = PGC 53418

14 56 36.2 +09 22 11; Boo

V = 13.3;  Size 1.7'x1.0';  PA = 82°

 

24" (7/14/15): fairly faint to moderately bright, slightly elongated E-W, ~45"x36", well concentrated with a small very bright core.  Brighter of a close pair with IC 1078 2' SE.  UGC 9616 = VV 26 lies 7.3' SE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1079 = J. 1-332, along with IC 1078, on 17 May 1892 and recorded "F, vS, R, gbM."

******************************

 

IC 1080 = MCG -01-38-010 = PGC 53480

14 57 59.8 -06 43 24; Lib

V = 13.8;  Size 1.4'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.9;  PA = 30°

 

18" (7/24/11): faint, fairly small, oval 3:2 SW-NE, 26"x18", broad weak concentration, no distinct zones.  Located 3' ESE of mag 8.8 HD 132149.  MCG -01-38-012 lies 9.4' SE and PGC 160367 is 15' ENE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1080 = J. 2-787 on 9 Jun 1893.

******************************

 

IC 1081 = ESO 581-009 = MCG -03-38-036 = PGC 53525

14 58 55.1 -19 14 21; Lib

V = 13.8;  Size 1.4'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 147°

 

17.5": very faint, very elongated NW-SE, 1.2'x0.3', low even surface brightness.  Very weakly concentrated.  Forms a close pair with brighter NGC 5791 2.7' SW and 5.7' due north of a mag 10 star.

 

Frank Muller discovered IC 1081 = LM(S) 677, along with IC 1077, on 18 Mar 1887 and recorded "1.0'x0.3', E 175°".  Muller didn't make an offset measure in declination.  Howe measured an accurate position in 1898, though the IC position is 4' too far south.

******************************

 

IC 1083 = MCG +12-14-014 = CGCG 337-024 = PGC 53362

14 55 33.4 +68 24 31; UMi

Size 0.7'x0.4';  PA = 94°

 

24" (7/10/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 4:3, ~24"x18", broad gradual concentration but no well defined core or nucleus.  A 15" pair (uncatalogued) of mag 11.8/12.5 stars is 7' ESE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1083 = Sw. VII-55 on 2 Aug 1888 and reported "eeF; S; R; D * in field f."  His position is less than 2' NW of PGC 53362 and the double star following clinches the identification.

******************************

 

IC 1084 = MCG -01-38-017 = PGC 53648

15 01 14.9 -07 28 30; Lib

V = 14.2;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 171°

 

18" (6/13/07): faint, fairly small, irregularly round, 25"x20".  Located south of a group of 4 stars in a triangular pattern and 5' ESE of much brighter NGC 5812.

 

Francis Leavenworth discovered IC 1084 = LM(S) 693 on 30 Mar 1887 at the Leander McCormick Observatory and noted "mag 15.6, 0.3', R, dif."  His micrometric position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1085 = MCG +03-38-074 = CGCG 105-098 = PGC 53710

15 02 43.4 +17 15 09; Boo

V = 13.9;  Size 0.9'x0.75';  PA = 24°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated N-S, 30"x25".  Well concentrated with a small bright core (round).  The low surface brightness halo appears elongated ~5:4.  A mag 13 star is 1.8' SW.  Located 6.4' ENE of mag 9.4 SAO 101342.  IC 1086 lies 14' SE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1085 = J. 1-334, along with IC 1086, on 8 Jul 1891.  His position is over 1' too far south, apparently due to an error in the declination of the offset star (SAO 101342).

******************************

 

IC 1086 = MCG +03-38-077 = CGCG 105-101 = PGC 53734

15 03 29.2 +17 06 52; Boo

V = 14.4;  Size 0.6'x0.4';  PA = 165°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, very small, round, 15" diameter, high surface brightness, occasional stellar nucleus.  IC 1085 lies 14' NW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1086 = J. 1-335, along with IC 1085, on 8 Jul 1891.  His position is 1.7' too far south, apparently due to an error in the declination of the offset star.  Some sources (such as Megastar) misidentify nearby MCG +03-38-078 as IC 1086.  This fainter galaxy is closer to Javelle's poor position.

******************************

 

IC 1087 = MCG +01-38-031 = CGCG 049-002a = PGC 53952

15 06 43.9 +03 46 36; Vir

V = 14.6;  Size 0.6'x0.2';  PA = 80°

 

24" (6/30/16): at 322x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated WSW-ENE, ~24"x18", small bright nucleus.  IC 1087 is the brighter of a close pair with UGC 9710 (misidentified as modern sources as IC 1088) just 32" SW.  IC 1088 is a mag 15.5-16 star 1.2' NE.

 

Mrk 1392 (brightest in the trio WBL 542) lies 12' SW.  It appeared fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 SW-NE, 30"x20", strongly concentrated, small bright nucleus (Seyfert 1 nucleus).  CGCG 048-116, 2.0' E, is fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 0.5'x0.4', fairly even surface brightness.  CGCG 048-117, 3.8' SE, is faint, small, round, stellar nucleus surrounded by an 0.3' halo.

 

17.5" (6/29/00): this is the brighter of close pair of difficult galaxies.  At 220x, it appeared as an extremely faint and small glow, perhaps 25" diameter.  At 280x a confused glow was visible and with extended viewing a close companion (UGC 9710) was just resolved to the southeast .  With concentration both members could almost be held continuously.  A mag 15 star lies 1.3' NE (this is IC 1088).

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1087 = J. 336, along with IC 1088, on 28 May 1891.  His reference for IC 1087 and IC 1088 was a mag 9-10 star at 15 07 02.6 +03 50 50 (2000).  His offsets for #336 = IC 1087 are -19.8 seconds of time and -4' 14.8" dec. This places IC 1087 at 15 06 42.8 +03 46 35 (J2000), a perfect match with the northwest galaxy of the pair.  IC 1088, though, refers to a mag 15 star 1.3' NE of IC 1088.  It is often misidentified as the southeast member of the pair.

******************************

 

IC 1088

15 06 47.4 +03 47 31; Vir

 

24" (6/30/16): at 322x; IC 1088 is a mag 15.5-16 star 1.2' NE of IC 1087.  Modern sources (UGC, MCG, CGCG, HyperLeda, SIMBAD) misidentify UGC 9710 as IC 1088.

 

UGC 9710 appeared extremely faint or very faint, fairly small, very low surface brightness streak, ~30"x5".  This galaxy is the fainter of a close pair with IC 1087 just 32" NW!

 

On 29 Jun 2000 I also viewed UGC 9710 in my 17.5" and recorded, "fainter of a very close pair with IC 1087 [33" between centers].  Glimpsed with averted vision only as a very small, elongated glow, ~20"x10" E-W.  It was difficult to hold IC 1087 and UGC 9710 simultaneously.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1088 = J. 336, along with IC 1087, on 28 May 1891.  See IC 1087.

******************************

 

IC 1091 = MCG -02-39-001 = PGC 54044

15 08 13.5 -11 08 27; Lib

V = 13.4;  Size 1.1'x0.7';  PA = 132°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 NW-SE, ~0.6'x0.3', low even surface brightness, no noticeable core or zones.  Located 9.5' NW of NGC 5858.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1091 = Big. 187 on 1 Jun 1888 and recorded "mag 13.4-13.5; diffuse; 40" diameter; stellar nucleus.  His position matches PGC 54044.

******************************

 

IC 1093 = UGC 9727 = MCG +03-39-002 = CGCG 106-006 = PGC 54002

15 07 35.6 +14 32 53; Boo

V = 14.4;  Size 1.0'x0.7';  PA = 115°

 

24" (6/14/15): faint to fairly faint, fairly small, round, 0.6' diameter, very weak concentration, overall low surface brightness.  IC 1094 lies 5' NNE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1093 = J. 1-340, along with IC 1094, on 8 Jul 1891 with the 30-inch refractor at the Nice Observatory.  He recorded "pB, vS, R, lbM".  His position is 1.6' too far south (same offset as IC 1094).

******************************

 

IC 1094 = MCG +03-39-006 = VIII Zw 453 = CGCG 106-008 = PGC 54006 + 54009 + 54011

15 07 42.2 +14 37 30; Boo

V = 15.0;  Size 0.5'x0.4'

 

24" (6/14/15): IC 1094 NED1 appeared very faint, very small, round, at most 15" diameter.  Forms a very close pair with IC 1094 NED2+3 (itself a very close, unresolved double), just 22" between centers.  The second galaxy was very faint, extremely small, quasi-stellar (6" or less).  IC 1093 lies 5' SSW.

 

Zwicky called VIII Zw 453 a "Triplet of fuzzy red elliptical galaxies" with No. 1  m(p) = 15.8, No. 2  25" NNE of No. 1; m(p) = 17.6 and No. 3  8" SE of No. 2; m(p) = 18.0.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1094 = J. 1-341, along with IC 1093, on 8 Jul 1891 with the 30-inch refractor at the Nice Observatory.  He recorded "pB, vS, R, biN" implying he noticed two of the three components.

******************************

 

IC 1095 = MCG +02-39-002 = CGCG 077-019 = VIII Zw 454 = PGC 54063

15 08 35.1 +13 40 14; Boo

V = 14.8;  Size 0.6'x0.5'

 

24" (6/13/15): faint, small, slightly elongated, 20"x16", low even surface brightness.  Forms an interacting double system with MCG +02-39-003 just 28" NW.  The compact companion is extremely faint and small, round, just ~6" diameter.  It's squeezed between IC 1095 and a mag 15.5 star just 23" W.  On the SDSS, the companion is attached at the tip of a stretched spiral arm from IC 1095.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1095 = Sw. VIII-85 on 26 May 1889 and recorded "eeF; S; lE; * 9m in field sf."  His position is exactly 20' too far north but the 9th mag star HD 134335 fits his description and the RA matches.  I'm assuming he only picked up the brighter component of this double system.  Harold Corwin and Malcolm Thomson agree with this identification.

******************************

 

IC 1096 = MCG +03-39-008 = CGCG 106-010 = WBL 548-001 = PGC 54050

15 08 21.6 +19 11 32; Boo

V = 15.0;  Size 0.5'x0.3';  PA = 77°

 

24" (6/13/15): faint, small, round, 12" diameter.  First and faintest in a trio with CGCG 106-011 (misidentified as IC 1096 in all modern sources) 1.1' NE and IC 1097 2.3' ESE.  Situated 1.2' SSE of a mag 10.3 star and 1.6' W of a mag 11.2 star!  The two stars and 3 galaxies are within a 3' circle.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1096 = J. 1-342, along with IC 1097, on 20 Jul 1892.  His micrometric position matches CGCG 106-010 = PGC 54050, the faintest of 3 galaxies in a trio.  IC 1097 matches UGC 9735 = PGC 54059, the second brightest.  Apparently either Javelle missed CGCG 106-011 = PGC 54055, the brightest in the trio, or perhaps just failed to measure a position.  In any case all modern catalogues (MCG, CGCG, PGC, HyperLeda, SIMBAD, UGC Notes) misidentify CGCG 106-011 as IC 1096. Malcolm Thomson and Harold Corwin agree with this identification.  See their identification files for more.

******************************

 

IC 1097 = UGC 9735 = MCG +03-39-010 = CGCG 106-012 = WBL 548-003 = PGC 54059

15 08 31.3 +19 11 03; Boo

V = 14.6;  Size 1.1'x0.4';  PA = 58°

 

24" (6/13/15): faint, elongated 5:2 SW-NE, 30"x12", small slightly brighter core.  A mag 11.2 star is 0.9' NW.  Largest and second brightest in a trio with fainter IC 1096 2.4' WNW and brighter CGCG 106-011 2.2' NW.  A mag 10.3 star is 1' W of CGCG 106-011.

 

CGCG 106-011 is the brightest of the triplet. It appeared fairly faint to moderately bright, small, round, 18" diameter, small bright nucleus.  Flanked by a mag 11 star 1.3' SE and a mag 10.3 star 1' W, so in a 3' region there are 3 galaxies and two fairly bright stars!  CGCG 106-011 is misidentified as IC 1096 in all modern catalogues.

 

UGC 9738 was picked up 8.7' NE.  It appeared very faint, small, round, very low surface brightness, 20" diameter.

 

17.5" (6/3/00): faint, small, elongated 2:1 SW-NE, 40"x20".  Contains a 15" brighter core with very faint extensions visible intermittently.  A mag 11 star is just 0.9' NW of center.  Forms a pair with MCG +03-39-009 (misidentified as IC 1096 in major catalogues) 2.2' NW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1097 = J. 1-343, along with IC 1096, on 20 Jul 1892.  His micrometric position is accurate. See IC 1096.

******************************

 

IC 1099 = UGC 9731 = MCG +09-25-021 = CGCG 297-003 = PGC 53967

15 06 54.7 +56 30 32; Dra

V = 13.7;  Size 1.1'x1.0'

 

24" (7/28/19): at 322x, fairly faint, fairly small, round, 30" diameter, very weak concentration with a very slightly brighter core.  A mag 14.5 star is 2' SW and other stars are nearby.  MCG +09-25-019 and -020 is 13' SSW.

 

24" (7/10/18): at 375x; faint, fairly small, round, ~0.7' diameter, weak concentration, slightly brighter core along a SW-NE axis (central bar).  Bracketed by a mag 14.3 star 1.5' NE and a mag 14.5 star 1.0' SW, with a mag 15.4 star 1.7' SE.  MCG +09-25-019 and -020, a very close pair of galaxies (25" separation), lies 13' S.  -019 appeared faint, small, round, 20" diameter and -020 was extremely faint and small, 10" diameter.

 

Edward Swift, Lewis Swift's teenage son, discovered IC 1099 = Sw. IX-46 on 8 Jun 1890.  In his 9th discovery list Lewis reported, "eeeF; pS; R; midway betw 2 vF nr. st."  The position is 2' too far SE, but the identification is nearly certain with the two stars 1' SSW and 1.5' NNE.

******************************

 

IC 1000 = UGC 9170 = MCG +03-37-003 = CGCG 104-004 = PGC 51201

14 19 40.3 +17 51 17; Boo

V = 13.6;  Size 0.9'x0.5';  PA = 23°

 

24" (7/1/19): at 375x; between fairly faint and moderately bright, fairly small, very elongated 3:1 NW-SE, 35"x12", slightly brighter nucleus.  Forms a similar pair with IC 999 2.2' NW.

 

IC 9171, a very low surface brightness superthin 3' ESE, popped occasionally as an extremely faint, small sliver NW-SE (probably only the brighter central part glimpsed).

 

CGCG 104-006, located 12' SE, appeared very faint, small, round, 20" diameter, low surface brightness.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1000 = J. 1-284, along with IC 999, on 23 Jun 1892.  His position is off the east side of the galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1100 = NGC 5881 = UGC 9729 = MCG +11-18-025 = CGCG 318-014 = PGC 54150

15 06 20.7 +62 58 52; Dra

V = 13.3;  Size 0.8'x0.7';  PA = 60°

 

17.5" (6/14/96): faint, fairly small, elongated 4:3 WSW-ENE, 40"x30", weak concentration.  Bracketed by a mag 13 star 52" SW of center and a mag 12 star 1.8' NNE.  NGC identification uncertain (poor position from WH) and this galaxy is identified as IC 1100 (from Swift) in UGC, MCG, CGCG and RC3.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1100 = Sw. IX-45 on 22 Jun 1889 and logged "vF; pS; lE; bet 2 stars."  His position is 1.2' NW of UGC 9729.  This galaxy was probably discovered by William Herschel on 26 Apr 1789 (sweep 930) and noted H II-818 as "pF, cL, R, vgbM."  CH's reduced position is 52 sec of RA east and 2' south of UGC 9729.  Dreyer notes in the 1912 "Scientific Papers", that the listed RA in GC and NGC was 2 tmin too large (the actual error is ~ 2 min 45 sec).  Because of this error, Bigourdan and d'Arrest were unable to locate NGC 5881 and Swift assumed his rediscovery was new, though Dreyer noted in his "Scientific Papers of William Herschel" that "II-818 is probably = IC 1100."

 

UGC, MCG, CGCG and RC3 all label this galaxy as IC 1100 (because of the unambiguous position) instead of NGC 5881.  I wrote up this case in RNGC Corrections #6 and it is discussed in Corwin's notes.

******************************

 

IC 1101 = UGC 9752 = CGCG 049-023 = PGC 54167

15 10 56.1 +05 44 41; Vir

V = 13.7;  Size 1.2'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 23°

 

18" (6/30/11): this supergiant cD galaxy is the central galaxy in AGC 2029 (z = .078 at 1.0 billion light years!).  At 280x, it appeared very faint, very small, slightly elongated ~N-S, ~15"x10".  Visible continuously with averted vision.  The galaxy is centered within a 9-member circlet of 12th- to 14th-magnitude stars and squeezed between a mag 14.7 star 27" E and a mag 15-15.5 star 47" WNW (just slightly south of a line connecting these stars).  No other members of the cluster were seen.  I also viewed IC 1101 at a similar magnification in a 24" f/3.3 and logged it as "faint, very small, oval 3:2 N-S, ~20"x14".  Could just hold steadily with direct vision."

 

Wikipedia states this galaxy is the largest known in the universe, from 5-6 million light years.  A 1991 paper by Uson, Boughn, & Kuhn (ApJ, 369, 46) gives a slightly smaller, though still extremely large diameter of 4 million light years.

 

Edward Swift, the son of Lewis Swift, discovered IC 1101 = Sw. IX-47 on 19 Jun 1890 at the age of 19.  Lewis noted that he and Edward disagreed on the description after the telescope was moved, and as a result no description is given in Swift's 9th discovery list.  In his survey of NGC/IC objects around 1900, Herbert Howe found it to be "extremely faint and very small.  A star of mag 13 follows 1.5 seconds...and another precedes 2 seconds, a little north."  UGC does not label their entry (UGC 9752) as IC 1101.

 

This is a super-giant cD in the center of AGC 2029 at a distance of 1.07 billion light years (slightly larger redshift than AGC 2065!).  IC 1101 is certainly one of the most distant galaxies discovered visually (and possibly the most distant)!

******************************

 

IC 1102 = UGC 9754 = CGCG 049-025 = Mrk 1395 = PGC 54188

15 11 04.9 +04 17 38; Vir

V = 13.9;  Size 1.1'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 18°

 

24" (7/18/17): at 282x; fairly faint, elongated 2:1 ~N-S, 25"x12", nearly even surface brightness.  Two mag 11.9 and 13.4 stars (1.4' separation) lie 2'-3' SE.  Member of the USGC U690 group containing 21 galaxies.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1102 = Sw. X-30 on 24 Jun 1891 and reported "eeeF; vS; F * with dist. com[panion] nr. nf; eee diff."  His position is 2' too far SE, but there are no other nearby candidates and two stars match his description, so the identification is certain.

******************************

 

IC 1103 = OGC 495 = LEDA 1584180

15 11 35.9 +19 12 28; Ser

V = 14.4;  Size 0.8'x0.5';  PA = 178°

 

24" (7/1/19): at 282x and 375x; between faint and fairly faint, small, slightly elongated N-S, ~20"x15", very small brighter nucleus, occasional stellar nucleus.  Located 15' NNW of mag 5.9 HD 134943 and 17' WSW of the bright double star STF 1919 (6.7/7.4 at 23").

 

This galaxy lies at a distance of 1.1 billion light years and is included in Ogle's "Catalog of the Most Optically Luminous Galaxies at z<0.3".

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1103 = J. 1-344 on 20 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.  This galaxy isn't included in the PGC and HyperLEDA only uses a LEDA designation.  Megastar has it identified as a MAC.

******************************

 

IC 1105 = MCG +01-39-007 = CGCG 049-053 = WBL 554-005 = PGC 54338

15 13 13.9 +04 17 15; Ser

V = 13.9;  Size 0.9'x0.5';  PA = 94°

 

24" (7/18/17): at 282x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 E-W, ~30"x20", brighter quasi-stellar nucleus.  Forms a close pair with CGCG 049-048 0.5' SW [33" between centers].  The companion was faint, small, slightly elongated E-W, weak stellar nucleus, ~20"x15".  LEDA 3125594, situated 1.6' WNW of IC 1105, occasionally popped as an extremely faint and small glow (V = 16.2).

 

IC 1105 is the brightest member of the galaxy group WBL 554, which contains 6 additional CGCG galaxies and resides at a distance of ~500 million l.y.  Five of these galaxies form a chain oriented WNW-ESE and are situated ~12' N.  WBL 551, a smaller group at a similar redshift, lies ~30' W.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1105 = Sw. X-31, along with IC 1102, on 24 Jun 1891.  He reported "eeF; S; lE; F * nr np; 3 distant st. in a curve sf."  His position is 2' too far SE, but 3 stars to the SE match his description and the identification is secure.  Swift missed the companion off the southwest side.

******************************

 

IC 1106 = CGCG 049-066 = PGC 54375

15 13 56.3 +04 42 39; Ser

V = 14.4;  Size 0.9'x0.4';  PA = 34°

 

24" (7/28/19): at 322x; brighter and larger of a pair with IC 1107 3.2' E.  Appeared fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 SSW-NNE, 40"x20".  A mag 14.5-15 star is 1' E.  Member of the USGC U690 group (21 galaxies) at ~500 million l.y.

 

CGCG 049-057, situated 11' WNW, appeared very faint, small, slightly elongated NW-SE, 20"x15", irregular surface brightness.  In a group of 4 mag 14-15 stars.   A mag 10 star is 3.3' NNE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1106 = J. 1-345, along with IC 1107, on 18 May 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1107 = CGCG 049-068 NED2 = PGC 54391 = LEDA 1272206

15 14 09.0 +04 42 52; Ser

V = 14.7;  Size 0.7'x0.55';  PA = 141°

 

24" (7/28/19): at 322x; between faint and fairly faint, fairly small,  roundish, low even surface brightness.  A mag 15 star is attached on the NW end.  Member of the USGC U690 group (21 galaxies) with IC 1106 3.2' W.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1107 = J. 1-346, along with IC 1106, on 18 May 1892.  His position is accurate.  IC 1107 is not in the PGC.  HyperLEDA misidentifies an extremely faint edge-on 2.7' NNE as IC 1107.

******************************

 

IC 1108 = NGC 5882 = PK 327+10.1 = ESO 274-7 = PN G327.8+10.0

15 16 49.9 -45 38 58; Lup

V = 9.5;  Size 16"x15"

 

See observing notes for NGC 5882

 

Williamina Fleming found IC 1108 on a photograph of stellar spectra at Harvard's Arequipa station and announced as a star with a spectra of the "fifth type" in 1894 (AN 3227, 195).  Later that year, she reported "this object is in reality a gaseous nebula".  This planetary was originally discovered by John Herschel on 27 Sep 1834 and catalogued as h3594 (later NGC 5882). The equivalence apparently went unannounced until Andris Lauberts (ESO) and Harold Corwin ran across it while scanning southern Schmidt plates.

******************************

 

IC 1109 = CGCG 049-094 = PGC 54549

15 17 04.0 +05 15 22; Ser

V = 14.2;  Size 0.7'x0.7'

 

24" (7/14/18): at 375x; fairly faint, small, round, 20" diameter, very small brighter nucleus.  Located 4.5' ESE of a mag 10.2 star.   CGCG 049-110, situated 16' ENE, also appeared fairly faint, round, 0.4' diameter, very small brighter nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1109 = Sw. X-32 on 25 Jun 1891 and reported "eeeF; pS; R; * nr nf; eee diff."

******************************

 

IC 1110 = UGC 9773 = MCG +11-19-001 = CGCG 318-022 = CGCG 3198-004 = PGC 54265

15 12 05.1 +67 21 45; UMi

V = 14.0;  Size 1.4'x0.4';  PA = 76°

 

24" (7/8/13): at 320x appeared fairly faint, fairly small, edge-on 4:1 WSW-ENE, 0.6'x0.15', very small bright core, distinct stellar nucleus.  Located 15' W of mag 5.1 HD 136064.  The center of the Ursa Minor Dwarf galaxy is 20' SW and IC 1110 is not far off the NE end.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1110 = Sw. VII-56 on 2 Aug 1888 and noted "eeF; S; vE."  His RA is 19 seconds too small but the identification is certain.

******************************

 

IC 1111 = NGC 5876 = UGC 9747 = MCG +09-25-028 = CGCG 274-028 = LGG 395-002 = PGC 54110

15 09 31.6 +54 30 23; Boo

V = 12.7;  Size 2.4'x1.2';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 50°

 

See observing notes for NGC 5876.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1111 = Sw. VIII-86 on 26 Aug 1888 and recorded "pB; S; R; triangle with 2 st."  There is nothing at his position but most sources, including HyperLeda and SIMBAD, identify UGC 9800 as IC 1111.  This galaxy is situated 14' ENE of Swift's position, but more importantly there are no nearby stars forming an obvious triangle.  Harold Corwin noticed that NGC 5876, located 5 minutes of RA west of Swift's position, has two mag 12-13 stars 2' NW and 3' SW forming a distinctive triangle.  Ironically, Swift made the original discovery on 11 Jun 1885. So, likely NGC 5876 = IC 1111.  See Harold Corwin's comments on IC 1111.

******************************

 

IC 1112 = CGCG 049-107 = PGC 54604

15 17 47.4 +07 13 06; Ser

V = 14.1;  Size 1.0'x0.7';  PA = 121°

 

18" (7/4/08): faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 NW-SE, 0.8'x0.35'.  Located 20' NE of UGC 9799 in AGC 2052.  CGCG 049-104 lies 3.6' SW.

 

Edward Swift, Lewis' 19 year-old son, discovered IC 1112 = Sw. IX-48 on 19 Jun 1890 and recorded "eeF; pS; R."  The position matches CGCG 049-107 = PGC 54604.

******************************

 

IC 1116 = MCG +02-39-017 = CGCG 077-085 = PGC 54848

15 21 55.4 +08 25 25; Ser

V = 12.8;  Size 1.6'x1.6';  Surf Br = 13.7

 

18" (7/28/03): fairly faint, moderately large, slightly elongated N-S, 1.0'x0.8'.  Contains a very small brighter core.  Located 4.5' ESE of mag 8.7 SAO 120958 and ~15' SW of the rich core of AGC 2063.  This galaxy is the brightest member of AGC 2063 although it is southwest of the main clump of galaxies.  UGC 09821 lies 3' W.

 

Edward Swift, Lewis' 19 year-old son, discovered IC 1116 = Sw. IX-49 on 19 Jun 1890 and recorded "eeF; S; R."  The position matches CGCG 077-085 = PGC 54848.

******************************

 

IC 1121 = CGCG 049-166 = PGC 55152

15 27 44.1 +06 48 14; Ser

V = 14.1;  Size 0.8'x0.65';  PA = 54°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 375x; faint, small, round, 15" diameter, possible stellar nucleus.  The view is somewhat confused by a mag 14.5-15 star at the northwest edge [14" from center].

 

Edward Swift discovered IC 1121 = Sw. IX-50 on 19 Jun 1890 and recorded "eeeF; eS; stellar; vF * close p[receding]."  The Swift's position is within 1' and the description applies to this compact galaxy.  Howe noted the "vF * close p" is of mag 13.5 and is 20" distant at 315° [NW]."

******************************

 

IC 1122 = MAC 1529+0737 = PGC 1326415

15 29 23.1 +07 37 03; Ser

V = 14.8;  Size 0.5'x0.5'

 

24" (6/13/15): very faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  Can just hold continuously with averted at 365x (6mm ZAO).  Located 3' NW of NGC 5931.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1122 = B. 192 on 4 Jun 1889 and recorded "mag 13.5; 30"-40" diameter, eF stellar nucleus."  Dreyer also credited Barnard with the discovery based on his announcement of a new nebula found on 15 May 1890 while searching for the asteroid Eucharis. But Barnard's observation referred to NGC 5931 instead.  HyperLeda misidentifies IC 1122 as NGC 5931, but IC 1122 = LEDA 1326415.  Corwin and Thomson concur that IC 1122 is not equal to NGC 5931.

******************************

 

IC 1124 = UGC 9869 = MCG +04-37-001 = CGCG 136-005 = PGC 55254

15 30 00.9 +23 38 18; Ser

V = 13.8;  Size 1.0'x0.35';  PA = 77°

 

24" (7/20/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 WSW-ENE, ~40"x18", brighter core.  A mag 15.5 star is off the WSW end [46" from center] and a 16th mag star is at the NE flank.  Located 7' SSW of mag 7.6 HD 138266 and 11' S of mag 7.6 HD 138214.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1124 = Sw. VIII-88 on 28 May 1889 and reported "eeF; vS; vE; 2 pB st. in field n."  His RA is 30 seconds too large but the description fits.  Stephane Javelle found the galaxy again and recorded J. 1367 as "pB, elongated in p.a. 250°, 30" to 40" length, mag 12-13 stellar nucleus." with an accurate position.  Dreyer realized that Javelle's object was the same as IC 1124 and noted this in the IC Notes/Corrections appendix, along with Javelle's accurate position.

 

Swift VIII,#88.  15hr 28m 21s +23° 49'.1

Confirmed galaxy: This is not an error in the context normally found and I enter it only for the historical significance.

Javelle made an observation some 14 years after Swift and noted the presence of a nebula, (he numbered as J.1367), which he measured from the 7.3Mv star DM+24°2874 resulting in coordinates of 15hr 27m 49s +23° 48'.2 which are at quite some variance with those given by Swift as to RA.  However, when this object is examined on the Palomar print there can be no doubt that despite the very inaccurate Swift coordinates this is definitely Swift's object #88 as can be established by reference to his description in which he stated "eeF; vS; vE; 2 pB st. in field n," and the south following of these 2 stars is Javelle's DM+24°2874.

 

Dreyer obviously concluded that the Javelle observation was a duplicate as he not only equated the two observations (Notes and Corrections to the Index Catalogue 1888-1894.  NGC/IC page 377.), but he also has no reference to any identity for J.1367 in his IC II, however, he did employ Swift's coordinates which are in considerable error, fortunately the modern catalogues do not reflect this, rather their coordinates are in keeping with those given by Javelle.

******************************

 

IC 1125 = UGC 9888 = VV 723 = MCG +00-40-003 = CGCG 022-012 = PGC 55388

15 33 05.6 -01 37 42; Ser

V = 13.4;  Size 1.6'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 147°

 

24" (8/1/19): at 322x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated 4:3 ~N-S, ~40"x30", broad weak concentration.  The halo appears slightly irregular in shape and brightness. A mag 13 star is 1' NE.

 

24" (6/23/17): at 260x; fairly faint, oval 3:2 or 5:3 NNW-SSE, ~40"x25", weak concentration but no distinct core.  A mag 13.3 star is 1.2' NE.  Located 12' WNW of mag 8.3 HD 139514.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1125 = J. 2-789 on 10 Jun 1893.  His position is on the northwest side of UGC 9888 and the identification is certain.

 

Harold Corwin suggests that IC 1128 (discovered by Lewis Swift on 28 May 1889) is probably IC 1125 with a 5 minute error in RA and a 5 arcmin error in declination.   The CGCG identifies CGCG 022-018 = UGC 9939 as IC 1128.  This galaxy is much closer to Swift's position (similar RA, but 12' to the north).  But this galaxy has a companion (CGCG 022-017) that Corwin feels that Swift would have also picked up.  Most modern sources (including HyperLeda) follow CGCG.

******************************

 

IC 1127 = Arp 220 = IC 4553 = UGC 9913 = MCG +04-37-005 = CGCG 163-017 = VV 540 = PGC 55497

15 34 57.2 +23 30 10; Ser

V = 13.2;  Size 1.5'x1.2';  Surf Br = 13.7

 

24" (6/16/12): fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, slightly elongated, uneven surface brightness and irregular appearance, though the core was not resolved into two components.  Forms a pair with IC 4554 2.2' SE (not part of Arp 220 as generally assumed).

 

17.5" (4/7/89): fairly faint, almost round, even surface brightness.  This is an interacting double system with an extremely faint "knot" or extension at the south end [elongated E-W on the POSS].  IC 4554 is a separate galaxy 2.2' SE of the double system observed.

 

Considered the prototype of a megamaser with 98% of its emission in the infrared.  In addition there is a large starburst of young stars.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1127 = Sf. 7 on 4 May 1866.  He simply noted "pF" and there is nothing at his position by 1 minute of RA west is IC 4553 (found again by Javelle in 1903).  Dreyer missed the equivalence IC 4553 = IC 1127.  See Harold Corwin's and Malcolm Thomson's notes on this number.

******************************

 

IC 1128 = UGC 9939 = MCG +00-40-004 = CGCG 022-018 = PGC 55648

15 37 52.9 -01 44 07; Ser

V = 14.0;  Size 1.1'x0.8';  PA = 179°

 

24" (8/1/19): at 322x; fairly faint, fairly small, oval 4:3 N-S, weak concentration, 30"x24".  Brighter and larger of a pair with CGCG 022-017 (2.7' SW), which appeared faint, small, slightly elongated NNW-SSE, 18"x12", very small brighter nucleus.  Located 13' WNW of mag 8.3 HD 139514.

 

This galaxy is identified as IC 1128 in CGCG, PGC and RC3 but the identification is uncertain and IC 1128 may be duplicate of IC 1125.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1128 = Sw. VIII-89 on 28 May 1889 and recorded "pF; pS; R."  There is nothing at his position.  CGCG (and followed by PGC, RC3 and SIMBAD) identified UGC 9939 as IC 1128.  This galaxy is 11.5' due south of Swift's position.  This is the brightest galaxy nearby, though Corwin questions this identification as Swift should have noticed the companion (CGCG 022-017) 2.7' SW.  Instead he suggests IC 1128 is a duplicate observation of IC 1125, nearly 5' of RA to the west and 5' S.

******************************

 

IC 1129 = UGC 9899 = MCG +11-19-010 = CGCG 319-019 = PGC 55330

15 32 00.8 +68 14 47; UMi

V = 13.1;  Size 1.0'x0.85';  PA = 170°

 

24" (7/20/17): at 375x; moderately bright, fairly small, roundish, ~40" diameter.  Contains a bright, round core.  The halo increases in size with averted vision and changes in shape/orientation like low surface brightness spiral arms.  A 25" pair of mag 11.7/12.6 stars lie 5' NE.

 

Edward Swift, son of Lewis Swift, discovered IC 1129 = Sw. VII-57 on 13 Jul 1887.  Swift logged "vF; pS; iR; D * nr. nf."  The double star is mentioned in my observation.

******************************

 

IC 1130 = MCG +03-40-014 = CGCG 107-015 = PGC 55644

15 37 44.0 +17 14 40; Ser

V = 14.8;  Size 0.75'x0.5';  PA = 37°

 

24" (7/28/19): at 322x; faint, fairly small, low surface brightness, elongated ~4:3 SSW-NNE in the direction of a mag 12 star 2' NNE.  Located 4.3' W of mag 8.8 HD 139495.  CGCG 107-031 lies 17' WNW.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1130 = B. 195 on 29 May 1889.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1131 = MCG +02-40-008 = CGCG 078-036 = Holm 717a = PGC 55683

15 38 51.7 +12 04 50; Ser

V = 13.9;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  PA = 153°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, small, round, 18" diameter, broad concentration.  A small trio of 14th magnitude stars is close west, with the galaxy nearly forming a parallelogram.  Located 8' SE of NGC 5970.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1131 = J. 1-351 on 29 Jun 1891 and recorded "pretty faint, round, 10" diameter, stellar."  Dreyer added "II. 76 [NGC 5970] np." in the IC.  Javelle's position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1132 = UGC 9965 = MCG +04-37-020 = CGCG 136-049 = LGG 403-005 = PGC 55750

15 40 06.8 +20 40 50; Ser

V = 13.6;  Size 1.1'x1.0'

 

24" (7/20/17): at 322x; fairly faint, moderately large, at least 60" diameter, fairly low surface brightness, broad weak concentration, slightly brighter core but no nucleus.  CGCG 136-052, located 10' SE, appeared faint, fairly small, edge-on 3:1 NNW-SSE, ~30"x10", even surface brightness.  Nestled within a group of a half-dozen stars.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1132 = Sf. 9 on 9 May 1866.  His position is 3' too far southwest.

******************************

 

IC 1133 = UGC 9973 = MCG +03-40-027 = PGC 55793

15 41 12.2 +15 34 22; Ser

V = 14.1;  Size 1.2'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 130°

 

17.5" (6/4/94): faint, very elongated 3:1 NW-SE, low even surface brightness.  Located 2.1' E of a mag 10 star that detracts from viewing.  Picked up 13.6' SSW of NGC 5980.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1133 = J. 1-352 on 1 Jul 1891.  His micrometric position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1137 = LEDA 2816978

15 48 32.6 +08 35 17; Ser

V = 14.1;  Size 0.6'x0.6'

 

24" (7/21/17): at 282x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 20" diameter, nearly even surface brightness (moderately high) except for a very small brighter nucleus.  A mag 12 star is 1' NW.

 

CGCG 078-078, located 12.6' NNE, appeared very faint, small, round, low even surface brightness, ~15" diameter. This galaxy was surprisingly faint for mag 15.3z, but the SDSS blue mag is 16.1.

 

CGCG 078-079, located 16.5' NNE, appeared faint to fairly faint, small, slightly elongated SW-NE, very weak concentration, 25"x20".  A mag 15.5 star is off the NE edge. This galaxy is also known as RX J1548.9+0851 (X-ray source) and it's the brightest member of a galaxy group at z = .072, corresponding to a light travel time of 962 million years!

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1137 = Sw. IX-51 on 19 Apr 1890 and reported "vF; S; R; 9m * close np."   His RA is 8 seconds too small, but the identification is certain as the brighter star is 1' NW.  Dreyer made a 30 second error in precessing Swift's RA, so the IC position is 22 seconds of RA too large.  Harold Corwin noted this error in his IC corrections list.  LEDA fails to label its LEDA 2816978 as IC 1137.

******************************

 

IC 1139 = CGCG 366-017 = PGC 55236

15 29 26.1 +82 35 02; UMi

Size 0.65'x0.25';  PA = 53°

 

24" (6/22/17): faint to fairly faint, small, elongated ~3:2 SW-NE, 18"x12".  Brighter IC 1143 lies 8' SSE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1139 = Sw. VII-58, along with IC 1143, on 18 Jun 1888 and recorded "eeeF; S; lE; eee diff.; np of 2 [with IC 1143]."  His position is 1' too far NE, but clearly determines this galaxy.  Nevertheless, MCG misidentifies MCG +14-07-019 (situated 8' NW of IC 1139) as IC 1139

******************************

 

IC 1141 = UGC 10051 = Mrk 861 = MCG +02-40-014 = CGCG 078-081 = PGC 56141

15 49 46.9 +12 23 58; Ser

V = 13.9;  Size 0.5'x0.5'

 

24" (7/21/17): at 375x and 500x; fairly faint, fairly small, roundish, 20" diameter, contains a sharp stellar nucleus.  A mag 15.5 star is superimposed on the west side and it was difficult to simultaneously view both the nucleus and the star.  A faint triple star (components 14.7/15.3/15.9 with sides 11"/14"/16") lies 3' NW.  IC 1141 is located 10' SSE of mag 6.7 HD 141589.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1141 = Sw. VII-60 on 12 Apr 1888 and reported "vF, vS, R.".  His RA is 8 seconds too small, but matches in declination.

******************************

 

IC 1142 = UGC 10055 = MCG +03-40-050 = CGCG 107-045 = PGC 56169

15 50 25.9 +18 08 22; Ser

V = 14.0;  Size 1.0'x0.75;  PA = 160°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 200x; very faint, fairly small, round, 30" diameter, low even surface brightness.  Located 24' due east of mag 4.1 Kappa (35) Ser.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1142 = J. 1-356 on 27 Jun 1892.  There is nothing at his position but Harold Corwin found that Javelle made a 1 minute error in his RA offset from his comparison.  Once this is corrected, his position is a good match with UGC 10055.

******************************

 

IC 1143 = UGC 9932 = MCG +14-07-022 = CGCG 366-018 = PGC 55279

15 30 56.0 +82 27 21; UMi

V = 13.2;  Size 1.0'x1.0'

 

24" (6/22/17): moderately bright, small, round.  Contains a high surface brightness core ~20" diameter that increases to the center, surrounded by a very low surface brightness halo perhaps 40" diameter.  A mag 13 star is 50" SE of center.  Brightest in a group with MCG +14-07-020 and -021 ~3' SW.  IC 1139 lies 8' NNW.

 

MCG +14-07-020, situated 3.4' SW, appeared extremely faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  I didn't notice fainter MCG +14-07-021 only 0.9' E of -020, though it should be visible.  CGCG 366-021, situated 13' SE, appeared extremely or very faint, round, ~30" diameter, very low surface brightness, no core or nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1143 = Sw. VII-59, along with IC 1139, on 18 Jun 1888 and recorded "pF; vS; R; * nr; sf of 2 [with IC 1139]."  His position is fairly accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1144 = UGC 10069 = Mrk 491 = MCG +07-33-001 = CGCG 223-006 = PGC 56216

15 51 21.7 +43 25 04; Her

V = 13.7;  Size 0.75'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 107°

 

24" (7/21/17): at 375x; moderately bright, fairly small, slightly elongated ~E-W, ~0.5'x0.4', contains a very small bright nucleus, overall high surface brightness.  A mag 10.8 star is 6' SE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1144 = Sw. IX-52 on 7 Jun 1890.  He reported "eeeF; vS; R; 9m * sf."  His position is 1.7' too far north, but the identification is certains with a 10th mag. star 6' SE.

******************************

 

IC 1145 = UGC 10032 = MCG +12-15-015 = MCG +12-15-015 = PGC 55904

15 44 08.5 +72 25 52; UMi

V = 14.2;  Size 1.5'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 168°

 

24" (6/23/17): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, very elongated 3:1 or 7:2 NNW-SSE, ~0.8'x0.25', broad weak concentration but no distinct core.  NGC 6011 lies 19' SE.

 

Edward Swift discovered IC 1145 = Sw. VII-61 on 13 Jul 1887 and recorded "eeF; pS; R; Not GC 4146 [NGC 6011]."  The published RA is about 2 minutes too large and the dec 1.5' too large (an error of ~10'), but there are no other nearby candidates so the identification is fairly secure.  Coincidentally, the position is about 17' due north of NGC 6011, though Swift claimed "Not NGC 6011", so he apparently also viewed this galaxy.  MCG fails to label its MCG +12-15-015 as IC 1145.

******************************

 

IC 1146 = MCG +12-15-019 = CGCG 338-021 = PGC 56085

15 48 22.1 +69 23 08; Dra

V = 13.8;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 105°

 

18" (7/10/10): fairly faint, small, round, 25" diameter very small bright nucleus.  Arp 109 lies 5' NNW and MCG +12-15-020 is 3.8' NNE.  Located 9' SE of mag 7.5 HD 141987.

 

MCG +12-15-020 = PGC 56091 is extremely faint and small, round, 6" diameter (core only viewed).  Situated immediately NNE of a mag 11 star.

 

Arp 109 consists of the interacting pair VV 291a = UGC 10053 = PGC 56057 and VV 291b = CGCG 338-020 = PGC 56063.  At 285x, VV 291a appeared very faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, lower surface brightness than VV 291b just 1.8' ESE.  VV 291b appeared very faint, round, 15" diameter, compact appearance.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1146 = Sw. VII-62, along with IC 1147] on 2 Aug 1888 and recorded "vF; pS; R; forms arc of circle with 2 st; sp of 2 [with IC 1147]."  He missed the 3 fainter galaxies in the field to the north, including Arp 109.

******************************

 

IC 1147 = MCG +12-15-027 = CGCG 338-027 = PGC 56159

15 50 11.7 +69 33 36; Dra

V = 14.6;  Size 0.5'x0.4'

 

24" (7/20/17): at 225x and 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, weak even concentration, faint stellar nucleus.  Located 5.8' ESE of mag 9.3 SAO 16866.  CGCG 338-022 lies 8.6' NW and Arp 109 = UGC 10053 is 13' SW.  CGCG 338-022 appeared faint or fairly faint, small, round, 18" diameter, faint stellar nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1147 = Sw. VII-63, along with IC 1146, on 2 Aug 1888 and reported "eeF; S; R; ee diff.; nf of 2 [with IC 1146]."  His position is 1.5' too far NW, a similar offset error as IC 1146.

******************************

 

IC 1148 = NGC 6020 = UGC 10100 = MCG +04-38-002 = CGCG 137-005 = LGG 403-009 = PGC 56467

15 57 08.1 +22 24 16; Ser

V = 12.7;  Size 1.4'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 140°

 

See observing notes for NGC 6020.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1148 = Sf. 10 on 9 May 1866 with the 18.5" refractor at the Dearborn Observatory.  The discovery list was not published until 1887 so Safford is not credited in the main NGC table.  Édouard Stephan independently found the galaxy on 27 Jun 1876, measured an accurate position in list VII-2 (later NGC 6020), and was credited by Dreyer with the discovery.  When Dreyer obtained Safford's list, he apparently missed the equivalence with NGC 6020 and catalogued this galaxy again as IC 1148.  So, NGC 6020 = IC 1148.

******************************

 

IC 1149 = UGC 10108 = MCG +02-41-001 = CGCG 079-015 = PGC 56511

15 58 08.0 +12 04 13; Ser

V = 13.5;  Size 1.2'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 162°

 

24" (7/18/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated NNW-SSE, ~30"x25", slightly brighter core, uneven surface brightness in halo.  Located 31' SE of STF 1988, a 2" pair of evenly matched mag 7.6/7.8 stars.  The pair was cleanly split at 375x.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1149 = Sw. 10A-8 = Sw. XI-182 on 16 Jun 1892 and reported, "eeF, pS, R, in centre of rhombus of 4 stars, v diff."  His position is close west of UGC 10108, which is surrounded by several stars, although a trapezoid of 4 stars is a better description.  This galaxy is Swift's final catalogued discovery made in Rochester before moving to Lowe Observatory on Echo Mountain in Southern California.  His first discoveries there were in 1895.  Interestingly, that year he discovered a comet, while searching for "the last nebula discovered at the Warner Observatory...just prior to the dismantling of that institution, had never been catalogued or published, so on the morning of August 21st, the nebula being near the meridian, it occurred to me to look it up and secure, perhaps, a more accurate position...…I saw to my astonishment a beautiful comet instead of the expected nebula."   The comet's position that night was close to UGC 313, but I have no other evidence that was Swift's target.

 

Swift reobserved IC 1149 again on 16 Sep 1896 from Echo Mountain and reported it in his 11th discovery list with a slightly modified position (25 seconds of RA too small) and description ("in center of trapezium"), probably to make sure Dreyer didn't miss these discoveries.  Howe measured an accurate position in 1900 and suggested Swift's two entries were identical.  He described the surrounding stars as a rhomboid [trapezoid] and measured the separations and position angles.  All 5 objects Swift recorded as "new" that night were reobservations of objects he found in 1892, when he only reported 8 new objects in a short list between his formal 10th and 11th lists.

******************************

 

IC 1151 = UGC 10113 = MCG +03-41-015 = CGCG 108-028 = KUG 1556+175 = PGC 56537

15 58 32.3 +17 26 29; Ser

V = 12.9;  Size 2.5'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 30°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 200x and 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, oval 5:2 SSW-NNE, ~1.4'x0.6', broad concentration.  There is a strong suggestion of spiral structure in the halo with slightly brighter regions or arcs or spiral arms.  A 4' pair of double stars (∑1993/1994) is in the same low power field ~18' ESE; mag 8.6/8.9 at 20" and mag 10.0/12.5 at 17".

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1151 = J. 1-358 on 10 Jul 1891.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1152 = UGC 10103 = MCG +08-29-024 = CGCG 250-025 = WBL 596-002 = PGC 56450

15 56 43.3 +48 05 42; Her

V = 13.3;  Size 1.1'x1.0'

 

24" (7/14/15): fairly bright, moderately large, round, 0.8' diameter, small bright core.  In a group (WBL 596) with IC 1153 5.5' NE and CGCG 250-027 7' NE.

 

PGC 2309484, just 2.8' S, appeared faint, small, round, 12" diameter.  A mag 17 star is very close off the north side [18" from center].  PGC 2308445, 6' to the south, was very faint and small, slightly elongated N-S, 12"x8".  A mag 12.8 star lies 0.6' N.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1152 = Sw. VII-65, along with IC 1153, on 4 Jul 1888 and recorded "vF; S; R; sp of 2."

******************************

 

IC 1153 = UGC 10107 = MCG +08-29-026 = CGCG 250-026 = WBL 596-003 = PGC 56462

15 57 03.0 +48 10 06; Her

V = 12.9;  Size 1.2'x1.1'

 

24" (7/14/15): moderately bright, moderately large,, round, 0.8' diameter, small brighter core.  A mag 10.6 star lies 1.3' NE with CGCG 250-027 just north of the star.  In a group (WBL 596) with IC 1152 5.5' SW.  CGCG 250-027 appeared faint or fairly faint, small, elongated 2:1 E-W.  Contains a very small bright nucleus with faint extensions E-W (bar?).

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1153 = Sw. VII-66, along with IC 1152, on 4 Jul 1888 and recorded "pF; pS; R; bM, pB * nr nf, nf of 2."

******************************

 

IC 1154 = UGC 10088 = MCG +12-15-035 = CGCG 338-029 = PGC 56273

15 52 28.6 +70 22 31; UMi

V = 13.5;  Size 1.8'x1.2';  PA = 142°

 

24" (7/20/17): at 375x; fairly faint or moderately bright, round, ~30" diameter, well concentrated with a bright core, faint stellar nucleus.  Flanked by a mag 13 star 1.2' NW and a mag 14.5 star 1.3' S.   Located 31' SW of NGC 6048.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1154 = Sw. VII-64 on 2 Jul 1888 and reported "vF; pS; R."  His position is unusually accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1155 = MCG +03-41-023 = PGC 56648

16 00 35.8 +15 41 08; Ser

V = 14.3;  Size 0.8'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.5

 

24" (8/12/18): at 260x; faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, low nearly even surface brightness with a very wea concentration.  Located 3' ENE of a mag 8 star (HD 143551).  Forms an equilateral triangle with a mag 12.8 star 2' E and a similar star 2' N.

 

24" (6/13/15): fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 30"x25".  A mag 15.8 star was noted just off the east-southeast edge [34" from center].  Located 3.1' ENE of mag 7.9 SAO 101868.  IC 1161 is 10' ESE and CGCG 108-038 is 6' NW.

 

24" (6/28/14): faint to fairly faint, moderately large, slightly elongated, 40" diameter, weak concentration, fairly low surface brightness.  A mag 15.8 star is 30" SE of center, just off the edge.  Situated 3.2' ENE of mag 7.9 HD 143551, which interferes a bit with viewing.  Member of AGC 2147.

 

17.5" (7/21/90): faint, small, slightly elongated 4:3 NW-SE, even surface brightness.  A mag 15.5 star is at the SE end.  Located 3.1' ENE of a mag 8 SAO 101868.  IC 1161 lies 12' ESE.  Member of AGC 2147.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1155 = J. I-359, along with ICs 1150, 1157, 1160, 1163 and 1165, on 1 Aug 1891.  His position matches MCG +03-41-023 = PGC 56648.

******************************

 

IC 1156 = MCG +03-41-025 = CGCG 108-044 = PGC 56650

16 00 37.4 +19 43 23; Her

V = 13.5;  Size 1.0'x0.9'

 

24" (7/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, round, 30"-35" diameter.  Contains a fairly high surface brightness core and a thin halo.  A very faint mag 15.5 star is superimposed on the south side and a mag 14 star is 1.3' SSW.

 

CGCG 108-040, located 17' SSW, appeared faint, small, round, low even surface brightness, 15" diameter.

CGCG 108-053, located 18' SSE, appeared fairly faint, small, round, 20" diameter, stellar nucleus. A mag 10.5 star is 3.2' W and a mag 9.6 star is 5' S.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1156 = Sw. VII-67 on 15 Jun 1888 and reported "eeF; pS; lE; triangled with 2 nr. st. n[orth]."  His position is accurate, though I assume he is referring to the mag 11 star north and the mag 10 star due west.

******************************

 

IC 1157 = MCG +03-41-031 = CGCG 108-047 = WBL 600-001 = PGC 56680

16 00 56.3 +15 31 35; Ser

V = 14.9;  Size 0.8'x0.35';  PA = 135°

 

24" (6/13/15): at 375x; faint, elongated 5:2 NW-SE, 25"x10", low even surface brightness.  In AGC 2147 with IC 1160 2.4' SE, IC 1163 is 8.4' ESE and IC 1161 is 8.7' NE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1157 = J. I-360, along with ICs 1155, 1160, 1161, 1163 and 1165, on 1 Aug 1891.  His position matches CGCG 108-047 = PGC 56680.

******************************

 

IC 1158 = UGC 10133 = MCG +00-41-002 = PGC 56723

16 01 34.1 +01 42 28; Ser

V = 12.6;  Size 2.5'x1.7';  Surf Br = 14.0;  PA = 137°

 

17.5" (6/11/88): very faint, large, diffuse oval NW-SE.  Several stars are nearby north and south including a mag 12 star 3.1' NE.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1158 = Sw. X-33 on 7 July 1890 with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  While searching for Wolf's comet of 1884 he found a nebula described in his logbook as "vF, R, 1' dia, vgbM, an 8m star 22' exactly following."  His rough position (no offsets) and the description clearly applies to this galaxy.   Barnard found it again less than a month later (4 Aug), looking for d'Arrest's Comet!   Lewis Swift made an independent discovery on 17 July and reported the discovery in his 10th list. Barnard never published the discovery or informed Dreyer, so Swift is credited with the discovery in the IC.

******************************

 

IC 1160 = MCG +03-41-032 = CGCG 108-051 = WBL 600-002 = PGC 56683

16 01 02.5 +15 29 41; Ser

V = 14.9;  Size 0.7'x0.4';  PA = 140°

 

24" (6/13/15): very faint, small, elongated 3:2 NW-SE, 18"x12".  This member of AGC 2147 is situated 2.5' SE of slightly brighter IC 1157 and 6.8' WSW of brighter IC 1163.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1160 = J. 362, along with ICs 1155, 1157, 1161, 1163 and 1165, on 1 Aug 1891.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1161 = MCG +03-41-036 = CGCG 108-054 = PGC 56695

16 01 16.8 +15 38 43; Her

V = 14.2;  Size 0.8'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.7

 

24" (6/13/15): fairly faint, small, slightly elongated, slightly brighter nucleus, ~22"x18".  IC 1155 is 10' WNW, IC 1163 is 9' SSE, IC 1157 is 9' SW, IC 1160 is 10' SSW.

 

24" (6/28/14): fairly faint, small, round, 20", fairly high surface brightness, weak concentration.

 

17.5" (7/21/90): very faint, very small, slightly elongated, small bright core.  Forms a pair with IC 1155 12' WNW in AGC 2147.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1161 = J. I-363, along with ICs 1155, 1157, 1160, 1163 and 1165, on 1 Aug 1891.  His position matches CGCG 108-054 = PGC 56695.

******************************

 

IC 1162 = VV 452 = KUG 1559+178 = MCG +03-41-034 = CGCG 108-056 = PGC 56693

16 01 16.3 +17 40 40; Her

V = 14.7;  Size 0.7'x0.55';  PA = 161°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 375x; faint, small, round, 18" diameter, low surface brightness, no noticeable core.  Located 8' due south of 5.1-magnitude 5 Herc.  The view was significantly improved with the bright star placed outside the field.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1162 = J. 1-364 on 27 Jun 1892 and recorded "very faint, very small, round, difficult. Another suspected nearby."  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1163 = MCG +03-41-039 = CGCG 108-060 = WBL 600-003 = PGC 56717

16 01 30.5 +15 30 14; Ser

V = 14.2;  Size 0.7'x0.7'

 

24" (6/13/15): faint to fairly faint, small, round, 18" diameter.  IC 1160 lies 7' WSW, IC 1157 is 8.4' WNW, IC 1161 is 9.2' NNW.  Member of AGC 2147.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1163 = J. I-365, along with ICs 1155, 1157, 1160, 1161 and 1165, on 1 Aug 1891.  His position matches CGCG 108-060 = PGC 56717.

******************************

 

IC 1165 = VV 90 = CGCG 108-067 = MCG +03-41-048 = MCG +03-41-049 = PGC 56769 = PGC 56768

16 02 08.2 +15 41 38; Her

V = 13.7;  Size 0.5'x0.5'

 

24" (6/13/15): at 375x; the brighter northwest component (VV 90a = PGC 56769) of IC 1165 appeared faint, very small, round, 18" diameter.  The southeast component (VV 90b = PGC 56768) appeared extremely to very faint, very small, round, ~10" diameter.  Both galaxies share a small common halo with the centers of this merged system separated by just 14"! 

 

24" (6/28/14): at 375x and 500x, the main component (VV 90a) of this merged double system appeared fairly faint, small, round, 20" diameter, contains a stellar nucleus.  The fainter companion (VV 90b) is attached at the south edge, and appears as a very faint, quasi-stellar knot [nucleus of the galaxy], ~5" diameter.  Overall, the combined merged glow is ~30"x20", oriented NNW-SSE, containing two stellar nuclei.  Member of AGC 2147.

 

VV 91a lies 1.8' SW and appeared extremely to very faint, round, just 6" diameter.  Located just 21" NNW of a mag 12.9 star.  The fainter companion (VV 91b) off the NE edge was not seen.

 

17.5" (7/21/90): faint, fairly small, slightly elongated N-S, weak concentration.  Three mag 13 stars almost collinear in a 3.5' string NW-SE located about 2' W.  This is a merged double system that was not resolved.  Forms a pair with MCG +03-41-50 1' NNE in AGC 2147.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1165 = J. I-366, along with  ICs 1155, 1157, 1160, 1161 and 1163, on 1 Aug 1891.  His position matches CGCG 108-067 = PGC 56769, although CGCG (108-067) doesn't label this galaxy as IC 1165.

******************************

 

IC 1167 = MCG +03-41-065 = PGC 56900

16 03 52.8 +14 56 47; Ser

V = 14.7;  Size 0.5'x0.5'

 

18" (7/12/10): very faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  First in a group of galaxies including IC 1168 2.7' SE, UGC 10169 12' SE and UGC 10164 13' SE.  Forms a close pair with LEDA 3858573 1.0' NE, an extremely faint and small glow, roughly 6" diameter.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1167 = J. 1-368 on 8 Jul 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1168 = MCG +03-41-066 = CGCG 108-090N = PGC 56901

16 03 55.7 +14 54 09; Ser

V = 14.6;  Size 0.6'x0.45'

 

18" (7/12/10): very faint, very small, round, 15" galaxy.  Located just south of a trio of mag 12/13/14 stars and 3.7' NW of a mag 10 star.  IC 1167 lies 2.7' NNW and the UGC 10164/10169 lies 10' SE.  The companion just off the southeast edge (LEDA 3858574) was not seen.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1168 = J. 1-369 on 19 Jul 1891 and recorded "pF, vS, iF, 3 F st north.  Possibly double." As Javelle suspected, this galaxy is double with a companion off the southeast edge.

******************************

 

IC 1169 = UGC 10161 = MCG +02-41-004 = CGCG 079-033 = PGC 56925

16 04 13.4 +13 44 38; Ser

V = 13.3;  Size 1.0'x0.6';  PA = 10°

 

24" (7/18/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly oval 4:3 N-S, 35"x25", sharply concentrated with a small intense nucleus and a fairly small diffuse halo.

 

UGC 10176, a flat edge-on, lies 12' ESE.  It appeared very faint and thin, ~7:1 WSW-ENE, ~40"x6", very low surface brightness, slightly brighter (elongated) core region.  A mag 13.1 star is 1' N.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1169 = Sw. VII-68 = Sw. VIII-90 on 16 May 1888 and reported "eF; eS; R; stellar nearly bet. 2 distant F st."  The two distant stars in his description may be 4.8' due N and 5.6' S.  He probably found this galaxy again on 28 May 1889 and reported it as new in his 8th list with description "eF; vS; stellar; pB * n little f[ollowing]."  His position was 3.6' too far NE, but the star 4.8' N matches.

******************************

 

IC 1170 = CGCG 108-101s = PGC 56955

16 04 31.7 +17 43 17; Her

V = 16.8;  Size 0.4'x0.2';  PA = 84°

 

24" (6/4/16): at 322x; very faint, small, elongated 3:1 E-W, 20"x6".  Located 1.0' of the double system NGC 6041 in the central region of AGC 2151.

 

17.5" (5/13/88): extremely faint and small, elongated E-W, required averted vision.  Located just 1.0' W of the NGC 6041A/B double system and 2.0' SSE of NGC 6040A/B in the core of AGC 2151.

 

17.5" (3/23/85): at visual threshold, extremely small.  Just visible momentarily 0.9' W of NGC 6041.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1170 = J. 1-370 on 27 Jun 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1172 = NGC 6044 = MCG +03-41-084 = CGCG 108-110 = PGC 57015

16 04 59.7 +17 52 13; Her

V = 14.3;  Size 0.6'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.0

 

24" (8/1/19): at 322x; faint, small, round, 20" diameter, very small brighter nucleus. A mag 13 star is 1.4' WSW.  PGC 57020 lies 2.4' S, LEDA 84714 is 5.6' WSW and PGC 57055 is 5.5' ESE.

 

17.5" (5/13/88): very faint, very small, round.  A mag 14 star lies 1.4' WSW.  Located 5.6' N of NGC 6043 in the core of AGC 2151.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1172 = Big. 199 on 8 Jun 1888.  Harold Corwin notes his "position and description are exactly that of NGC 6044, the identity is certain."  NGC 6044 was discovered by Swift on 27 Jun 1886 and reported in list IV-23, along with several other members of the Hercules Galaxy Cluster.    His description reads "eeF; vS; R; vf * nr p[receding]; 5th of 10." and his position is 10 seconds west of CGCG 108-110 = PGC 57015.  CGCG labels the galaxy as IC 1172, though MCG uses NGC 6044.  In any case, IC 1172 = NGC 6044.

******************************

 

IC 1173 = UGC 10180 = MCG +03-41-089 = CGCG 108-133 = PGC 57037

16 05 12.6 +17 25 22; Her

V = 14.7;  Size 1.0'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 55°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; faint, fairly small, oval 3:2 or 5:3 SW-NE, 25"x15", low surface brightness with no noticeable core or nucleus.  A mag 12 star is 2' SSE.  IC 1186 lies 8' SE and CGCG 108-108 is 6.6' WNW (among other nearby members of AGC 2151).

 

17.5" (6/8/96): extremely faint, very small, round, 15" diameter, low even surface brightness.  Forms western vertex of a triangle with two mag 11 and 12 stars 2.2' SSE and 3.1' NE.  Located 20' S of NGC 6047 in the southern portion of AGC 2151. IC 1186 lies 8.4' SE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1173 = J. 1-371 on 15 Aug 1892.  His position is 0.7' too far south-southeast.

******************************

 

IC 1174 = UGC 10185 = MCG +03-41-091 = CGCG 108-116 = PGC 57059

16 05 26.8 +15 01 31; Ser

V = 13.5;  Size 1.0'x0.75';  PA = 50°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, slightly elongated, 40"x32", broad concentration.  No distinct core but a slightly brighter nucleus with direct vision.  Picked up 18' NE  of the Arp 101 pair.

 

18" (7/12/10): this surprisingly bright IC galaxy appeared fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, round, 30" diameter.  Increases steadily to the center. Arp 101 (UGC 10164 + UGC 10169) lies 18' SW.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1174 = Sf 77 on 26 Apr 1867 with the 18.5-inch refractor at the Dearborn Observatory.  He recorded "pF, S, bM, N = 12.5m." and his position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1176 = NGC 6056 = MCG +03-41-100 = CGCG 108-122 = PGC 57075

16 05 31.3 +17 57 49; Her

V = 13.9;  Size 0.9'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 56°

 

18" (7/13/07): faint, small, round, 25" diameter, broad and very weak concentration.

 

17.5" (5/13/88): faint, small, round, broad concentration.  Forms a pair with MCG +03-41-096 3' SSW.  This is one of the brighter galaxies in AGC 2151.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1176 = Sw. VII-69 on 8 Jun 1888 and recorded "eeF; pS iR; 2 pB star near south."  His position is a good match with NGC 6056, which Swift had discovered exactly two years earlier!  The positions for Swift's two observations are nearly identical and his description of VII-69 clearly applies to CGCG 108-122.  So, NGC 6056 = IC 1176.

 

CGCG and MCG label this galaxy as IC 1176, though the NGC designation should apply by prior discovery.

******************************

 

IC 1178 = Arp 172 NED1 = VV 194a = IC 1181A = UGC 10188 = MCG +03-41-097 = CGCG 108-120n = PGC 57062

16 05 33.1 +17 36 05; Her

V = 14.1;  Size 1.3'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.9

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, oval 5:4 or 4:3, ~40"x25".  Sharply concentrated with a small high surface brightness core and a low surface brightness halo with averted vision.  Forms an interacting pair (Arp 172) with IC 1181 [30" between centers] in AGC 2151.

 

PGC 57042 lies 5.6' SW.  This dim edge-on (V = 15.9) appeared extremely faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 NNW-SSE, 20"x10", very low surface brightness.  A mag 12 star is 0.8' NW and a mag 13 star is 1' NE.

 

17.5" (5/13/88): faint, small, round, bright core.  Brighter of a close pair with IC 1181 20" SE.  Located 12' S of IC 1182 in AGC 2151.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1178 = Sw. VII-70, along with IC 1181, on 3 Jun 1888 and noted "eeeF; pS; bet 2 st.  10th of 12."  His position is 2' west of Arp 172 and IC 1178 is generally assumed to be the northwest member of this close pair, with IC 1181 the southeast member.  Although this galaxy lies between 2 stars, his comment can be made to apply to most galaxies.  Corwin states that "Swift's position is not very good, and the fact that he does not mention either object in his description of the other, casts some doubt on the identification."  Gerard de Vaucouleurs called this galaxy IC 1181A in the "Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies" (RC1). See Corwin's identification notes.

******************************

 

IC 1179 = NGC 6050 = Arp 272 = VV 220 = UGC 10186 = MCG +03-41-092 = CGCG 108-118 = PGC 57058 = PGC 57053

16 05 23.4 +17 45 32; Her

V = 14.7;  Size 0.9'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.9;  PA = 132°

 

48" (5/15/12): this number is generally taken as the fainter, southwest component of the interacting and connected pair NGC 6050 in AGC 2151.  It appeared as a faint, diffuse glow attached to the southwest side of the brighter component, but was not individually resolved at 375x.  There was a very weak central brightening and a very faint nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1179 = Sw. VII-71 on 3 Jun 1888 and recorded "eeeF; pS; R.  11th of 12."  His position falls very close to the merged double system NGC 6050, discovered by Swift on 27 Jun 1886, and catalogued as Sw. IV-26.  PGC, SIMBAD and HyperLeda assign IC 1179 to the much fainter southwest component (NGC 6050B), but Corwin, Malcolm Thomson and I doubt that Swift could have resolved the pair.  Additionally Swift described NGC 6050A as "eeeF" (at his limit) but NGC 6050B is much fainter and furthermore he makes no mention of the nebula being double!  So, almost certainly IC 1179 is a duplicate observation of NGC 6050.  In the IC, Dreyer questioned if IC 1179 was a duplicate of NGC 6054 (it's not) and this is repeated in several sources such as Carlson.

******************************

 

IC 1181 = Arp 172 NED2 = VV 194b = UGC 10189 = MCG +03-41-098 = CGCG 108-120s = PGC 57063

16 05 33.8 +17 35 37; Her

V = 14.8;  Size 1.0'x0.7';  Surf Br = 14.0;  PA = 58°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; faint, very small, round, 12" diameter [core of the galaxy only].  Fainter component of an interacting pair (Arp 172) with brighter IC 1178 30" NNW.

 

17.5" (5/13/88): extremely faint and small, possibly elongated.  Forms a very close pair 20" SE of IC 1178 in AGC 2151.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1181 = Sw. VII-72, along with IC 1178, on 3 Jun 1888 and noted "eeeF; S; R.  12th of 12."  His position is a good match with PGC 57063, the southeast component of douby system Arp 172.  But Harold Corwin warns for IC 1178, "... the fact that he does not mention either object in his description of the other, casts some doubt on the identification."  Gerard de Vaucouleurs called this galaxy IC 1181B in the "Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies" (RC1).

******************************

 

IC 1182 = UGC 10192 = MCG +03-41-104 = CGCG 108-126 = Mrk 298 = PGC 57084

16 05 36.8 +17 48 08; Her

V = 14.2;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 80°

 

48" (5/5/16): at 488x; moderately bright, fairly small, slightly elongated ~E-W, contains a bright core that increases to the center.  A mag 14 star is 1.3' W and a mag 17.8 star was occasionally visible [34"] east.

 

The brightest knot or condensation (likely a tidal dwarf galaxy) in the tidal tail was faintly visible 1.2' due east of IC 1182.  It was generally visible as a very faint, small glow, slightly elongated E-W, ~10"x7".  NED identifies this galaxy as IC 1182:[S72] d from the 1972 paper by Alan Stockton titled "Blue Condensations Associated with Elliptical and S0 Galaxies".  This "knot" formed the western vertex of an obtuse isosceles triangle with a mag 17 star 40" NE and a mag 15 star 40" SE.  The portion of the tidal tail extending directly out of IC 1182 (past the mag 17.8 star) was not seen.

 

48" (5/15/12): fairly faint to moderately bright, small, irregularly round, ~20" diameter, brighter nucleus.  Located 1.4' E of a mag 14.3 star.  Similar NGC 6054 lies 2.0' S.   The jet extending out of the east side of the galaxy and the blue knots 1.2' E were not noticed (though not looked for).

 

17.5" (5/13/88): very faint, very small, slightly elongated.  Situated between two mag 14.5 stars 1.4' W of center and a mag 15 star following.  Easier than IC 1183 2.1' SSE and NGC 6054 2.5' SW in AGC 2151.  IC 1185 lies 5.4' SSE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1182 = J. 1-372 on 11 Aug 1892.  According to Harold Corwin in his Abell 2151 article, IC 1184 is a double or triple star 1.6' SE.  The UGC questions if IC 1182 = IC 1184, which is does not.

******************************

 

IC 1183 = NGC 6054 = MCG +03-41-103 = CGCG 108-128 = PGC 57086

16 05 38.1 +17 46 04; Her

V = 14.5;  Size 0.8'x0.4';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 70°

 

48" (5/15/12): fairly faint to moderately bright, small, oval 4:3 WSW-ENE, 20"x15".  Located 1.0' NE of a mag 12.6 star with a mag 16 star 1' S.  Brighter IC 1182 lies 2.1' NNW, fainter PGC 1541356 is 40" NE and MCG +03-41-099 (often identified as NGC 6054) is 1.8' W.  NGC 6054 is identified as IC 1183 in most sources

 

17.5" (5/13/88): very faint, very small, slightly elongated.  Located 1.0' NE of a mag 12.5 star. An extremely faint galaxy (MCG +03-41-099) is 1.5' W with IC 1182 2.1' NNW.  Member of AGC 2151.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1183 = Big. 203 = J. 372a on 1 Jun 1888.  Stephane Javelle picked it up again on 11 Aug 1892, as well as IC 1182.  But the original discovery was made by Lewis Swift on 27 Jun 1886, along with several other members of the Hercules Galaxy Cluster.  His description for Sw. IV-27 (later NGC 6054) reads "eeeF; pS; lE; f * v nr sp; 9th of 10."   His position is 13 seconds west of CGCG 108-128 = PGC 57073 (similar offset as NGC 6043, 6045, 6047, 6050) and his comment "faint star very near south-preceding" applies (the star is 1' southwest).  So, NGC 6054 = IC 1183.  Due to Swift's poor position MCG, PGC and RNGC misidentify CGCG 108-121 as NGC 6054 and the galaxy described here is called IC 1183.  See NGC 6054 for more.

******************************

 

IC 1185 = MCG +03-41-110 = CGCG 108-134 = PGC 57096

16 05 44.7 +17 43 01; Her

V = 13.9;  Size 0.8'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 8°

 

48" (4/5/13): bright, moderately large, oval 4:3 N-S, ~28"x21", small bright core.  NGC 6054 lies 3.4' NNW.  A mag 15 star is 1' SE.

 

17.5" (5/13/88): faint, small, round, small bright core.  A mag 15 star lies 1.1' SE of center.  Located 5.4' SSE of IC 1182 in the core of AGC 2151.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1185 = Big. 205 on 8 Jun 1888 and noted "star 13.3 accompanied with nebulosity of 20" diameter."  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1186 = MCG +03-41-111 = CGCG 108-133 = PGC 57095

16 05 44.2 +17 21 44; Her

V = 14.6;  Size 0.8'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 5°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, oval 3:2 N-S, 30"x20".  A fairly prominent string of 4 stars oriented SW-NE is just following.  IC 1173 lies 8.4' NW and IC 1188 is 8' NE.

 

17.5" (6/8/96): very faint, very small, elongated 3:2 N-S, 30"x20", low even surface brightness.  Located in the southern section of AGC 2151 just preceding a striking elongated group of 10 mag 9-13 star oriented SW-NE.  IC 1173 lies 8.4' NW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1186 = J. 1-373 on 15 Aug 1892.  His position is off the southeast side (similar offset error as other galaxies). CGCG doesn't recognize CGCG 108-133 as IC 1186.

******************************

 

IC 1188 = PGC 57127

16 06 07.3 +17 27 39; Her

V = 14.9;  Size 0.5'x0.3';  PA = 7°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; faint, small, round, 15" diameter, quasi-stellar nucleus.  Located 12' SE of IC 1178 in the southern part of the core of AGC 2151.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1188 = J. 1-374 on 15 Aug 1892.  His position is accurate.  This is a double system and NED identifes the brighter northwest component as IC 1188A.

******************************

 

IC 1189 = MCG +03-41-119 = CGCG 108-144 = Mrk 300 = PGC 57135

16 06 14.8 +18 10 58; Her

V = 14.5;  Size 0.7'x0.4';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 179°

 

24" (8/1/19): at 324x; fairly faint, small, slightly elongated N-S, 25"x20", very small brighter nucleus.  A mag 10.5 star is 1.3' N with three other galaxies (UGC 10195, CGCG 108-139 and NGC 6061) are within 6'.

 

24" (6/14/15): faint to fairly faint, small, elongated 3:2 N-S, ~21"x14", very small bright nucleus.  Located 4' S of brighter NGC 6061 and between a mag 10.6 star 1.3' N and a mag 11 star 2' SSW.

 

18" (7/13/07): faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  Located 4' S of NGC 6061 and situated between a mag 10.5 star 1.2' N and a mag 11.5 star 2.1' SSW. 

 

17.5" (6/14/96): extremely faint and small, round, 10" diameter.  Can almost hold steadily with averted vision.  Located 1.2' S of a mag 10 star in AGC 2151.  Brighter NGC 6061 is 4' N and MCG +03-41-115 3.5' WNW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1189 = Sw. VII-73 on 7 Jun 1888 and recorded "eeeF; pS; iR; bet. 2 st."  His RA is 5 seconds too small, but the comment "bet 2 st[ars]" clinches the identification.

******************************

 

IC 1190 = UGC 10195 = MCG +03-41-113 = CGCG 108-136 = PGC 57111

16 05 52.4 +18 13 14; Her

V = 14.7;  Size 1.3'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 120°

 

24" (8/1/19): at 324x; faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 NW-SE, 30"x15", weak concentration.  In a group of 4 galaxies with CGCG 108-139 2.3' SE.

 

24" (6/14/15): at 375x; very faint to faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 NW-SE, 0.5'x0.2', low even surface brightness.  Located 6' WSW of NGC 6061.  A mag 10.5 is near the midpoint between the two galaxies.

 

18" (7/13/07): extremely faint, fairly small, very low even surface brightness, edge-on 7:2 WSW-ESE, 40"x12".  Located 2.9' WSW of a mag 10.5 star.  MCG +03-41-115 lies 2.5' SE.

 

17.5" (6/14/96): extremely faint, elongated 3:2 NW-SE, 30"x20", low even surface brightness.  Located 3' W of a mag 10.5 star and 6' SW of NGC 6061 in the northeast portion of AGC 2151.  Similar MCG +03-41-115 lies 2.4' SE.

 

17.5": extremely faint, fairly small, very diffuse.  Located 5.9' WSW of NGC 6061 within AGC 2151.  MCG +3-41-115 = CGCG 108-139 2.4' SE not seen.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1190 = Sw. VII-74 on 7 Jun 1888 and recorded "eeeF; S; R; another [IC 1191] and [NGC] 6061 nr in line."  Corwin notes there is nothing close to Swift's position (other than NGC 6061 itself) but "his description "... another [= IC 1191] and [NGC] 6061 near in line" points to this galaxy [UGC 10195] (rather than to the fainter, smaller object at 16 03 45.6, +18 19 48) as the one he saw."  Modern sources label this galaxy as UGC 10195 only, instead of IC 1190.

******************************

 

IC 1191 = PGC 57152

16 06 28.7 +18 16 04; Her

Size 0.5'x0.1';  PA = 164°

 

24" (6/14/15): very faint, small, 18" diameter, no structure (not seen as double).  Located 3.3' NE of NGC 6061 in the north section of AGC 2151.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1191 = Sw. VII-75 on 7 Jun 1888 and recorded "eeeF; S; lE; another [IC 1190] and [NGC] 6061 nr in line."  Although his position for IC 1190 is poor, his position for IC 1191 is just 7 seconds of RA too small.  Harold Corwin gives the dimensions of the brighter component as 27"x7" in PASP, Vol 83 and notes "IC 1191 is also a double object similar to IC 1188 (separation = 11 arcseconds). The fainter companion lies at R.A. 16h 04m 14.8s, +18° 24' 6'' (1950)."

******************************

 

IC 1192 = PGC 57157

16 06 33.1 +17 46 32; Her

V = 15.3;  Size 0.8'x0.3';  PA = 114°

 

24" (7/9/13): faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 WNW-ESE, 0.4'x0.2'.  Forms the west vertex of a small equilateral triangle with IC 1194 1.7' SE and IC 1194A 1.3' ENE in the eastern portion of the Hercules cluster AGC 2151.

 

17.5" (6/8/96): extremely faint and small, round, 15" diameter.  Located 1.7' NW of brighter IC 1194 at the east end of AGC 2151.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1192 = J. 1-375, along with IC 1193 and IC 1194, on 13 Aug 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1193 = PGC 57155

16 06 32.2 +17 42 50; Her

V = 14.7;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  PA = 2°

 

24" (7/9/13): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:3 N-S, ~20"x12", weak concentration.  Forms a close pair with PGC 84738 1.0' NE (noted as extremely to very faint, very small, slightly elongated, 10"x7").  A mag 16 star lies 1.5' SW.  A small trio consisting of IC 1192, 1194 and 1194A is less than 4' NNE.

 

17.5" (6/8/96): extremely faint, very small.  Appears double or companion very close?  Furthest south in trio with IC 1194 3.3' NE and IC 1192 3.7' N at the east end of AGC 2151.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1193 = J. 1-376, along with IC 1192 and 1194, on 13 Aug 1892.  His position is nearly 1' too far north -- an unusually large error as his position for IC 1192 is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1194 = MCG +03-41-128 = CGCG 108-152 = PGC 57172

16 06 39.3 +17 45 40; Her

V = 14.3;  Size 0.6'x0.4';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 20°

 

24" (7/9/13): at 282x this AGC 2151 member appeared fairly faint to moderately bright, small, round, 20" diameter, gradually increases to the center.  Brightest in a small trio with IC 1192 1.7' NW and IC 1194A = PGC 84742 1.3' N.  Also nearby is IC 1193 3.3' SSW.

 

IC 1194A is located at Javelle's position for IC 1194, not the brighter galaxy 80" S (described above) that is generally assumed to be IC 1194.  It's possible Javelle assumed the brighter galaxy was a star, though it was clearly nonstellar in my scope at 282x.  IC 1194A appeared faint to fairly faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.

 

17.5" (6/8/96): very faint, very small, round.  Brightest in a trio with IC 1192 1.7' NW and IC 1193 3.3' SW at the east end of AGC 2151.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1194 = J. 1-377, along with IC 1192 and 1193, on 13 Aug 1892.  His position is a good match with the fainter lenticular 1.4' NE of IC 1192, which is commonly identified as IC 1194A = PGC 84742.  His position is also 1' north of the brighter elliptical (CGCG 108-152 = PGC 57172), which is described in my notes. CGCG 108-152 is identified as IC 1194 in most modern sources.  Perhaps Javelle made a 1' error in measuring the offset from his comparison star?  Interestingly, his offset is 1' too far north for nearby IC 1193 adding some support to this suggestion.

 

Corwin comments that "Perhaps he mistook the brighter object as a star, though it should have been clearly nebulous in the Nice 28-inch."  Malcolm Thomson and Corwin both identify IC 1194 = PGC 84742 based on the positional match, though the data here is for CGCG 108-152 as I'm not convinced.

******************************

 

IC 1195 = MCG +03-41-126 = CGCG 108-151 = PGC 57175

16 06 40.9 +17 11 30; Her

V = 14.8;  Size 0.6'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.1

 

17.5" (6/8/96): very faint, very small, elongated 3:2 ~N-S, 30"x20".  Following a parallelogram of four mag 10-12 stars (closest is 2.0' SW) at the SE edge of AGC 2151.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1195 = J. 1-378 on 23 Jun 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1196 = UGC 10218 = MCG +02-41-009 = CGCG 079-055 = PGC 57246

16 07 58.3 +10 46 46; Ser

V = 14.0;  Size 1.0'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 4°

 

24" (7/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:3 N-S, ~40"x24", brighter core.  The surface brightness is slightly patchy and the outer extensions [spiral arms] increase in length with averted.  Situated 2.4' NW of mag 9.3 SAO 101948.  A mag 13.7/15.5 pair of stars at ~20" separation is 1' SE.

 

UGC 10213, situated 23' SSW, appeared faint to fairly faint, moderately large, irregularly round, ~1.0'x0.8'.  A slightly brighter core seems a bit elongated.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1196 = Sw. VII-76 on 7 Apr 1888 and reported "eeeF; nr. p[receding] * of 3 in a line."  His position and description matches this galaxy, though Howe apparently missed the nearest and faintest of the 3 stars (MN, Nov. 1900).

******************************

 

IC 1197 = UGC 10219 = MCG +01-41-013 = CGCG 051-052 = FGC 1989 = PGC 57261

16 08 17.3 +07 32 19; Ser

V = 13.7;  Size 2.9'x0.45';  PA = 56°

 

24" (6/16/12): faint to fairly faint, fairly large thin edge-on 6:1 SW-NE, 1.8'x0.3', broad concentration, very slightly bulging center and tapering tips.

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1197 on 14 Jul 1890 with the Vienna 27-inch refractor.  His micrometric position in AN 2993 matches UGC 10219.  UGC doesn't label UGC 10219 as IC 1197.

******************************

 

IC 1199 = UGC 10242 = MCG +02-41-013 = CGCG 079-070 = PGC 57373

16 10 34.3 +10 02 25; Ser

V = 13.7;  Size 1.2'x0.4';  PA = 158°

 

24" (6/14/15): fairly faint, very elongated 3:1 NNW-SSE, 0.9'x0.3', slightly brighter along the major axis.  Located just 2' W of mag 7.5 HD 145436, which detracts from viewing.  A mag 12 star is 1' NW of center.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1199 = Sw. IX-55 on 28 Jun 1890.  He recorded "eeF; S; E; p. DM +10°2969, 9s; ee diff. in consequence of proximity to the star.  Found searching for D'Arrest Comet."  E.E. Barnard also found it just a few nights later (4 Jul 1890), also while searching for the comet.  He made a simple sketch showing the nearby stars and his computed position (using the bright star) is an exact match.  In his logbook entry for 7 Jul, he noted "Swift in looking for d'Arrest's Comet reports finding a new nebula 9s p (on same parallel) the 9.5m star DM +10°2969 and says it is the faintest neb he has ever seen."

******************************

 

IC 1200 = NGC 6079 = UGC 10206 = MCG +12-15-050 = CGCG 338-043 = PGC 56946

16 04 29.0 +69 40 05; UMi

V = 12.7;  Size 1.4'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 150°

 

17.5" (3/28/87): fairly faint, small, slightly elongated, brighter core.  A mag 14 star is 1.1' SSE.  Forms a pair with IC 1201 7.7' SE.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1200 = Sw. VII-77 on 2 Aug 1888 and recorded "pF pS; lE; *12 mag p close s; sp of 2 [with IC 1201]." His position matches UGC 10206 = PGC 56946, although IC 1201 is southeast.   William Herschel discovered this galaxy on 6 May 1791 (sweep 1005) and noted H. III-884 (later NGC 6079) as "vvF, vS, 300 verified it very plainly, and showed it of a considerable size."  His position, though, was 1 min of RA east and 2' too far south (similar offset as H. III 883 = NGC 6071, the previous object in the sweep).  Bigourdan later measured an accurate position on 18 Jul 1884 (repeated in the IC 2 notes).  So, IC 1200 = NGC 6071.

******************************

 

IC 1201 = UGC 10221 = MCG +12-15-051 = CGCG 338-044 = PGC 57104

16 05 41.8 +69 35 37; UMi

V = 14.7;  Size 1.2'x0.3';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 118°

 

17.5" (4/18/87): extremely faint, small, edge-on NW-SE, difficult with averted vision.  Located 7.7' SE of NGC 6079 on the Ursa Minor-Draco border.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1201 = Sw. VII-78 on 2 Aug 1888 and logged "eeeF; pS; iR; eee diff.; double star nr points to it; nf of 2 [with IC 1200]."  The double star is probably the pair 3' northwest.  The second galaxy IC 1200 is NGC 6079, although it is north-preceding, so IC 1201 is the "sf of 2".

******************************

 

IC 1202 = NGC 6081 = UGC 10272 = MCG +02-41-019 = CGCG 079-078 = PGC 57506

16 12 56.8 +09 52 02; Her

V = 13.1;  Size 1.8'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 131°

 

See observing notes for NGC 6081

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1202 = Sw. VII-79 on 7 Apr 1888 and recorded "eF; pS; R."  His position matches UGC 10272 = PGC 57506.  This galaxy was discovered earlier by Édouard Stephan on 26 Jul 1870 and catalogued as St. II-1 (later NGC 6081).  Dreyer missed the equivalence but IC 1202 = NGC 6081.

******************************

 

IC 1204 = MCG +12-15-053 = CGCG 338-046 = PGC 57206

16 07 15.5 +69 55 53; UMi

Size 0.9'x0.3';  PA = 64°

 

24" (6/14/15): faint to fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 or 3:1 SSW-NNE, 0.6'x0.2', brighter core but no nucleus.  Forms a pair with brighter NGC 6091 3.6' SE.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1204 = B. 207 on 25 Mar 1889 and logged "mag 13.4-13.5; 20" diameter; stellar nucleus, a star mag 11 in pa 100° [ESE], distance = 3'."  His Comptes Rendus position (used in the IC 1) is 19' too far south, but the position was corrected in the IC 2 Notes.  The CGCG and MCG ignore the IC designation, which is not in doubt.  See Corwin's notes for more.

******************************

 

IC 1205 = MCG +02-41-022 = CGCG 079-084 = PGC 57574

16 14 15.9 +09 32 14; Her

V = 13.9;  Size 0.5'x0.5'

 

24" (7/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint, round, 0.4' diameter, slightly brighter core appears slightly elongated N-S [SDSS reveals a central bar oriented N-S].  Situated 2.3' E of mag 8.5 HD 146083.  NGC 6081 lies 28' NW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1205 = Sw. VII-80 on 8 Apr 1888.  He reported "eF; S; lE; B * p[receding]."  His position is just 1.7' too  far southeast and the identication is certain based on the comment "B * p".

******************************

 

IC 1206 = UGC 10293 = MCG +02-41-023 = CGCG 079-087 = PGC 57623

16 15 13.1 +11 17 51; Her

V = 14.2;  Size 1.2'x0.75';  PA = 2°

 

24" (7/18/17): fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated N-S, 0.5'x0.4'.  Contains a stellar nucleus surrounded by the core of the galaxy.  An extremely low surface brightness outer halo was suspected.  A mag 10.5 star is 4' NE.  Located 12' SSE of mag 7.6 13 Herculi and 14' SW of mag 7.3 15 Herculi.

 

IC 1206 forms a close pair (similar redshifts) with CGCG 079-086 just 1.3' SSW of center.  The companion was very faint, small, round, low surface brightness, 12"-15" diameter.  A mag 16 star is close off its west edge [20" from center].

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1206 = Sw. VII-81 = Big. 208 on 3 Jun 1888 and reported "eF; S; R."  His position is just off the northwest edge of UGC 10293, so the identification is certain although he missed the close companion.  Bigourdan found it again on 28 Jun 1890 while searching for a comet discovered by d'Arrest.  He noted it was probably equivalent to Sw. VII-81 in his Comtes Rendus publication.  Dreyer credited both in the IC 1.

******************************

 

IC 1208 = CGCG 196-016 = PGC 57650

16 15 47.9 +36 31 38; CrB

V = 14.3;  Size 1.1'x0.25';  PA = 95°

 

24" (6/12/15): fairly faint, elongated 3:1 E-W, 30"x10", very small bright nucleus.  Located just 1.8' SSW of mag 7.0 HD 146639, which detracts from viewing.

 

CGCG 196-013 lies 13' W.  This galaxy appeared faint to fairly faint, elongated 3:2 SW-NE, 18"x12", very small bright nucleus.  Just west of line of 2 mag 13/13.5 star 1.3' NNE and 1.2' SSE.

 

Sherburne Burnham discovered IC 1208 on 21 May 1890 with the 36-inch refractor at Lick Observatory while examining mag 7.0 HD 146639.  He measured micrometric offsets from the star (also on 25 May) and published the results in AN, 127 [3048], 426 (1891) as well as Publications of Lick Observatory, Vol II, 1894.

******************************

 

IC 1209 = UGC 10329 = MCG +03-41-149 = CGCG 108-174 = CGCG 109-002 = PGC 57796

16 18 39.6 +15 33 30; Her

V = 13.5;  Size 1.2'x0.8';  PA = 4°

 

24" (7/18/17): fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, slightly elongated N-S, 40"x30", well concentrated with a bright core and stellar nucleus.  The outer halo is quite faint and doesn't have a distinct edge.  A bright wide double (8.7/10.0 at 35") is 2.6' SW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1209 = J. 1-380 on 19 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1210 = UGC 10304 = MCG +10-23-048 = CGCG 298-021 = KAZ 62 = PGC 57589

16 14 30.2 +62 32 12; Dra

V = 13.7;  Size 1.5'x0.4';  PA = 168°

 

24" (7/10/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:3 NNW-SSE, ~40"x25".  Occasionally there appeared to be an extremely faint star or knot near the south end.  Located 25' WNW of mag 7.3 HD 147407.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1210 = Sw. IX-58 on 7 Jun 1888 and reported it as "vF; vS; lE; r."  NGC 6111 has been mistakenly identified with this galaxy.  See that number.

******************************

 

IC 1211 = UGC 10314 = MCG +09-27-009 = CGCG 276-007 = I Zw 139 = PGC 57707

16 16 52.0 +53 00 22; Dra

V = 12.8;  Size 1.1'x1.0';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 42°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 375x moderately bright, fairly small, roundish.  Sharply concentrated with a prominent core and a much fainter halo 30"-40" diameter.  Located 17' SE of mag 6.9 Theta (13) Draconis.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1211 = Sw. VIII-91 on 27 May 1889 and recorded, "pB, vS, R, bM."  His position is a good match with UGC 10314.

******************************

 

IC 1212 = CGCG 320-016 = PGC 57633

16 15 30.8 +64 13 29; Dra

Size 0.7'x0.6'

 

24" (7/10/18): at 375x; fairly faint, small, round, 30" diameter, sharp concentration with a very small bright nucleus. A mag 15.5 star is at the northwest edge of the halo.  Located 6' SW of mag 8.6 HD 147203.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1212 = Sw. IX-60 on 22 Jun 1889 and reported "eeF; pS; R; 3 st in a line n., most distant D[double]."  His position and description is a match with this galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1213 = NGC 6172 = UGC 10352 = MCG +00-42-003 = CGCG 024-009 = PGC 57937

16 22 10.2 -01 30 54; Oph

V = 12.8;  Size 1.0'x1.0';  Surf Br = 12.8

 

17.5" (7/24/95): fairly faint, small, round, 30" diameter.  Moderate concentration with a very small bright core which stands out well surrounded by a small halo.  Preceded by three mag 13 and 14 stars within 3'.  Located 9' NW of a mag 10 star and 11' NE of a similar star. Incorrectly listed as nonexistent in RNGC.  Identified as IC 1213 in UGC, MCG.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1213 = Sw. IX-61 on 19 Apr 1890 and reported "F; vS; R."  His RA is 9 seconds too small.  This galaxy was first catalogued as NGC 6172 = St. XIII-86 on 21 Jun 1884, but due to a misprint in Stephan's list XIII, the RA is 10 tmin too large.  So, NGC 6172 = IC 1213 with priority to Stephan's observation.  Because of the erroneous position for NGC 6172, the RNGC misclassifies NGC 6172 as nonexistent and UGC 10352 is labeled as IC 1213, instead of NGC 7172, in UGC, MCG and CGCG. RC3 has the correct identification.

******************************

 

IC 1214 = UGC 10323 = MCG +11-20-009 = CGCG 320-019 = PGC 57675

16 16 11.7 +65 58 08; Dra

V = 14.0;  Size 1.0'x0.4';  PA = 17°

 

24" (7/20/17): at 375x; fairly faint, small, slightly elongated N-S, 20"x15", stellar nucleus, fairly high surface brightness.  Closeby are two stars; a mag 14 star is 0.6' W of center and a mag 15 star [western component of a faint pair] is 0.4' N.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1214 = Sw. VII-83 on 2 Jul 1888 and reported "eF; S; R; F * close p.  2nd of 4 [with IC 1215, 1216 and 1218]."  His position and description is a good match with UGC 10323, though he missed the star(s) at the north edge.   In a short errate table to his 8th lists he made the correction "omit: 2nd of 4".

******************************

 

IC 1215 = UGC 10315 = MCG +11-20-009a = CGCG 320-017 = CGCG 338-049 = Kaz 65 = PGC 57638

16 15 35.1 +68 23 52; Dra

V = 13.2;  Size 1.1'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 10°

 

24" (6/14/15): first and brightest in a trio with IC 1216 and IC 1218.  Fairly faint to moderately bright, oval 4:3 ~N-S, 40"x30", broad weak concentration.  IC 1216 lies 3.4' SE.  Located 17' SW of mag 6.4 HD 147662.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1215 = Sw. VII-82 on 2 Jul 1888 and recorded "vF; S; R."  He later added "1st of 4.", though IC 1214 is not nearby.  This error was corrected to "1st of 3 [with IC 1216 and 1218]" in a short errata table to his 8th list.

******************************

 

IC 1216 = UGC 10326 = MCG +11-20-010 = CGCG 320-021 = CGCG 338-050 = PGC 57664

16 15 55.4 +68 21 00; Dra

V = 14.1;  Size 1.0'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.8

 

24" (6/14/15): second and faintest in a trio with IC 1215 3.4' NW and IC 1218 10' SSE.  Faint to fairly faint, elongated 3:2, ~30"x20", low surface brightness with no significant core.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1216 = Sw. VII-84 on 2 Aug 1888 and recorded "eeeF; pS; R; eee diff; 3rd of 4."  His position is accurate.  In a short errate table to his 8th lists he made the correction "for: 3rd of 4  read: 2nd of 3 [with IC 1215 and 1218].."

******************************

 

IC 1218 = MCG +11-20-011 = CGCG 320-022 = Kaz 69 = PGC 57699

16 16 37.1 +68 12 10; Dra

V = 13.6;  Size 1.0'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.3;  PA = 58°

 

24" (6/14/15): fairly faint, elongated 3:1 SW-NE, 0.6'x0.2', brighter core.  Third of three with IC 1216 10' NNW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1218 = Sw. VII-86 on 2 Jul 1888 and recorded "vF; pS; lE, 4th of 4."  In a short errata table to his 8th list, he made the correction "3rd of 3 [with IC 1216 and 1218]".

******************************

 

IC 1219 = UGC 10371 = MCG +03-42-005 = CGCG 109-012 = PGC 58037

16 24 27.4 +19 28 57; Her

V = 13.9;  Size 1.0'x0.5';  PA = 122°

 

24" (8/12/18): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 NW-SE, 24"x15", occasional faint stellar nucleus. A mag 14.7 star is 1' E.  Situated 2.7' SW of mag 8.7 HD 148034.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1219 = J. 1-381 on 22 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1220 = MCG +01-42-005 = CGCG 052-030 = PGC 58340

16 29 38.3 +08 27 03; Her

V = 13.7;  Size 0.9'x0.9'

 

24" (7/18/17): fairly faint, fairly small, round, small bright core, ~24" diameter.  Located 12.5' ENE of mag 7.7 HD 148591.  Brightest in a trio with CGCG 052-028 5.5' SW and LEDA 3091631 3.6' SSE.  Also nearby are UGC 10414 12' N and UGC 10416 15' NE.

 

CGCG 052-028 appeared very faint, small, probably elongated 2:1 N-S, ~20"x10", very small core and sharp stellar nucleus.  A 14th mag star is off the NW edge [23" from center].  LEDA 3091631 was just a very small, faint glow, 10" diameter.  A mag 12.5 star is 1' E.  UGC 10414 was faint, fairly small, round, 24" diameter, low even surface brightness.  Between a mag 13 star 1.7' N and a mag 14 star 1.3' S.  UGC 10416 was faint to fairly faint, fairly small, roundish, 0.5'x0.4'.  Situated in the exact center of an isosceles triangle of 3 mag 11 stars 2.8' NNW, 2.9' SSW and 3.2' ESE.  The latter galaxy was actually discovered by E.E. Barnard but never published or reported to Dreyer, so it didn't receive an IC designation.

 

24" (8/5/13): fairly faint, fairly small, round.  Well concentrated with a 15" bright core that gradually increases to an occasional very faint stellar nucleus.  The core is surrounded by a thin low surface brightness halo ~24" diameter.  Situated 12.5' ENE of mag 7.7 HD 148591.  CGCG 052-028 lies 5.5' SW.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1220 = Sw. X-34 on 18 May 1890 with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  He simply noted "pF, S", but his offsets from mag 7.7 HD 148591 of +50 seconds in RA and ~+2.8' in Dec point directly to this galaxy.  Lewis Swift independently discovered this object just 2 months later on 21 Jul 1890 and recorded "eeF; pS; E."  His position is 15 seconds of RA too small, though the IC position is off by an additional 10 seconds of RA.  Swift is credited with the discovery in the IC as Barnard never published his discovery or informed Dreyer.  CGCG (052-030) and MCG (+01-42-005) don't label their catalogue entries as IC 1220.

******************************

 

IC 1221 = UGC 10458 = MCG +08-30-030 = CGCG 251-030 = PGC 58528

16 34 41.6 +46 23 31; Her

V = 13.8;  Size 1.2'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.8

 

18" (7/12/10): fairly faint, moderately large, slightly elongated, ~40"x35", very weak concentration.  A nice string of stars is SE with the closest mag 13 star 4' SE.  IC 1222 = Arp 73 lies 11' SSE.  Located 20' SW of mag 5.8 HD 150030.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1221 = Sw. X-35, along with IC 1222, on 10 Jul 1890 and logged "eeF; pS; E; p of 2 [with IC 1222]."

******************************

 

IC 1222 = Arp 73 = UGC 10461 = MCG +08-30-032 = CGCG 251-031 = PGC 58544

16 35 09.2 +46 12 50; Her

V = 13.4;  Size 1.7'x1.3';  Surf Br = 14.2;  PA = 50°

 

18" (7/12/10): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 SW-NE, brighter along the major axis [DSS shows this to be the "bar" of a two-armed barred spiral.  A group of 4 stars is west-southwest.  Forms a pair with IC 1221 11' NNW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1222 = Sw. X-36, along with IC 1221, on 10 Jul 1890 and logged "eeF; pL; R; f of 2 [with IC 1221]."

******************************

 

IC 1223 = CGCG 251-032 = MCG +08-30-033 = PGC 58567

16 35 42.5 +49 13 14; Her

V = 14.3;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  PA = 19°

 

24" (7/20/17): at 282x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated SSW-NNE, 0.5'x0.4', slightly brighter core.  Situated between a mag 12 star 2.9' WNW and a mag 13.5 star 2.0' ESE.  Located 6' N of a brighter mag 10.5 star.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1223 = Sw. X-37 on 11 Jul 1890 and reported "eeeF; pS; R; bet. 2 distant F st; B * with very distant com[panion] s[outh]."  His position is 4' too far northwest, but his description is a perfect match.

******************************

 

IC 1225 = UGC 10494 = MCG +11-20-022 = CGCG 320-034 = PGC 58607

16 36 52.5 +67 37 46; Dra

V = 14.5;  Size 1.3'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 72°

 

24" (7/20/17): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, edge-on 3:1 or 7:2 WSW-ENE, 0.6'x0.2', very small slightly brighter nucleus.  A mag 15 star is at the WSW tip and another 15th mag star is 30" N of center.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1225 = Sw. IX-62 on 24 Jul 1889 and reported "eeeF; vS; 2 or 3 vF st. inv.; * nr p[receding]."  His position is off the east edge of the galaxy and the description is appropriate.

******************************

 

IC 1226 = CGCG 251-038 = PGC 58754

16 41 06.6 +46 00 15; Her

V = 14.4;  Size 0.6'x0.5';  PA = 53°

 

24" (7/20/17): at 282x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 20"-24" diameter, broad weak concentration though no well defined nucleus.  A very distinctive curving string of 4 equally spaced stars extends to the southwest, with the galaxy perfectly fitting the curve.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1226 = Sw. X-38 on 11 Jul 1890 and reported "eF; S; R; forms arc of circle with 4 stars."  The 4 stars are the ones noted in my description.  The IC references Swift's 9th paper instead of his 10th.

******************************

 

IC 1227 = NGC 6206 = UGC 10506 = MCG +10-24-018 = CGCG 299-009 = PGC 58723

16 40 08.1 +58 37 02; Dra

V = 13.6;  Size 0.7'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.7

 

See observing notes for NGC 6206

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1227 = Big. 210 on 13 Aug 1888 while searching for NGC 6206 at Swift's poor position.  Bigourdan later realized the object he recorded was equivalent to NGC 6206 (corrected in Comptes Rendus, 1 Jul 1901).  Dreyer repeated NGC 6206 = IC 1227 in the IC 2 Notes. See Corwin's notes on IC 1227 for the full story.

******************************

 

IC 1228 = UGC 10524 = MCG +11-20-026 = CGCG 320-038 = PGC 58804

16 42 06.5 +65 35 08; Dra

V = 13.4;  Size 1.6'x1.5';  Surf Br = 14.1;  PA = 122°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint or moderately bright, very elongated 3:1 NW-SE, ~45"x15".  This description applies to the bright central bar of this spiral.  Sometimes I could glimpse the root of the spiral arms as curved ends of the bar, particularly at the northwest end.  A mag 12.7 star is 1.1' NNW of center.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1228 = Sw. X-39 on 13 Sep 1890 and recorded ""vF; pS * nr n[orth]; 4 st. in curve s[outh]."  His position and description matches UGC 10524.

******************************

 

IC 1229 = MCG +09-27-072 = PGC 58902

16 44 58.8 +51 18 29; Dra

V = 15.0;  Size 0.45'x0.4'

 

24" (7/10/18): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 20"-25" diameter, weak concentration.  IC 1230 lies 2.9' SSE.  A double star (SLE 15) is 6' N.

 

24" (7/15/15): fairly faint, fairly small, round, 0.4' diameter, weak concentration.  Forms a pair with brighter IC 1230 2.9' SSE.  Located 6' due south of mag 8.8 HD 151463 (wide unequal double).

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1229 = Sw. X-40, along with IC 1230, on 18 Sep 1890 and recorded "eeeF; pS; another nr south; D * in field n; others susp; np of 2; ee diff."  This galaxy is misidentified as IC 1225 in the UGC notes for IC 1230 = UGC 1038.

******************************

 

IC 1230 = UGC 10538 = MCG +09-27-073 = CGCG 276-041 = PGC 58903

16 45 01.6 +51 15 37; Her

V = 14.6;  Size 0.9'x0.9'

 

24" (7/10/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 40" diameter, fairly low even surface brightness.  A very faint mag 15.9 star is 0.8' S of center.  Brighter and larger of a pair with IC 1229 2.9' NNW.

 

24" (7/15/15): moderately bright and large, 0.8' diameter, sharply concentrated with a small bright nucleus, slightly elongated halo.  Brighter of a pair with IC 1229 2.9' NNW.

 

IC 1230 is a multiple system with 3 faint companions (V = 16-16.5); a close pair at the north edge of the halo and a second fainter nucleus (possible merged companion) less than 10" S of center.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1230 = Sw. X-41, along with IC 1229, on 18 Sep 1890 and recorded "eeeF; S; R; D * in field n; sf of 2; eee dif."

******************************

 

IC 1231 = UGC 10560 = MCG +10-24-056 = CGCG 299-029 = PGC 58973

16 46 59.0 +58 25 23; Dra

V = 12.9;  Size 2.2'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 154°

 

24" (7/19/17): at 375x; moderately bright and large, elongated 2:1 NNW-SSE, ~1.2'x0.6', broad weak concentration, mottled or uneven surface brightness.  A mag 9.6 star (HD 238609) lies 5' SW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1231 = Sw. IX-68 and reported "eeeF; L; R; evenly B; pB * sp."

******************************

 

IC 1232 = MCG +08-31-005 = Arp 312 NED1 = VV 197a = Holm 758a = CGCG 252-004 = PGC 59072

16 49 48.5 +46 43 05; Her

Size 0.5'x0.4'

 

24" (6/29/16): at 375x; the brightest member of Arp 312 (identified as a pair in NED but classified by Arp as a group) appeared fairly faint to moderately bright, small, round, 20" diameter.  MCG +08-31-006 is attached at the southeast edge (centers separated by 23") with the halos fused on the SDSS.  MCG +08-31-004 (faintest member) lies 46" SW and LEDA 3097788 (attached to a faint star and not seen) is 1.0' NE.  Located 4.5' NNW of mag 6.8 HD 152238.  Redshift-based distance ~530 million l.y.

 

18" (7/12/10): brightest in the Arp 312 trio and northwest component of an attached pair with MCG +08-31-006.  At 285x appeared faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  MCG +08-31-006 is at the SE edge [23" between centers] and very faint, round, 10" diameter.  MCG +08-31-004 (faintest member) lies 46" SW, so the entire triplet is squeezed into a 1' circle!  Located 4.6' NNW of mag 6.8 HD 152238.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1232 = Sw. IX-69 on 11 Jul 1890 and reported "eeeF; S; iR; B * with distant companion nr. sf.  Driving clock failed."  His RA is given only to the nearest minute and marked as uncertain (?), but there's nothing near his position (about 6' N of 5th magnitude 52 Herculi) that matches in declination.  Harold Corwin suggests NGC 1232 is likely a duplicate of IC 1226, situated 8 minutes of RA west of Swift's position (perhaps he added a few minutes to the RA, instead of subtracting), though the declination is still off by ~5'.  This galaxy has a bright star nearby, but it is southwest, not southeast.

 

Courtney Seligman suggests "what Swift saw was probably an internal reflection of the light from the bright star."  In 2016 Yann Pothier suggested to Harold Corwin that Arp 312 = PGC 59071/2 is Swift's IC 1232.  The RA is essentially matches, though the declination is off by +38'.  But there is a bright star near SE with a wide companion, matching Swift's description.  This is probably the best candidate, though not certain due to the error in declination.  Steinicke classifies the number as nonexistent.

******************************

 

IC 1233 = NGC 6247 = UGC 10572 = CGCG 320-044 = PGC 59023

16 48 20.2 +62 58 35; Dra

V = 13.5;  Size 1.1'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 58°

 

See observing notes for NGC 6247.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1233 = Sw. IX-70 on 24 Jul 1889 and reported "eF; vS; vE; bet. 2 stars."  There is nothing at his position, but 10' south is NGC 6247, discovered by Heinrich d'Arrest on 24 Sep 1862 with the 11-inch refractor at Copenhagen.  Dreyer questioned if IC 1233 = NGC 6247 in the IC description.

******************************

 

IC 1236 = UGC 10633 = VV 442 = MCG +03-43-010 = CGCG 110-019 = PGC 59350

16 58 29.6 +20 02 29; Her

V = 13.6;  Size 1.1'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 51°

 

24" (7/15/15): fairly faint, fairly small, round, 40" diameter, irregular surface brightness, slight hint of structure [face-on spiral].  A mag 14 star is 1.4' WNW. Located 6.4' SSE of mag 7.7 HD 153374.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1236 = Sf 44 = Sw. X-42 on 1 Aug 1866 with the 18.5" refractor at the Dearborn Observatory and noted "pF, SbM."  His discovery list was not published, though, until 1887.  E.E. Barnard independently ran across it while sweeping with the 12-inch refractor at Lick on 30 Jul 30 1888, though he recognized it was Sf 44.  Lewis Swift also found it on 17 Sep 1890 and logged "eF; pS; lE; B * nr N; vF * close p."

******************************

 

IC 1237 = UGC 10621 = MCG +09-28-010 = CGCG 277-016 = PGC 59280

16 56 16.1 +55 01 35; Dra

V = 13.8;  Size 1.9'x1.0';  Surf Br = 14.2;  PA = 21°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, elongated 5:2 SSW-NNE, 40"x15", broad concentration.  Sometimes a low surface halo increases the dimensions to at least 50"x25".  A mag 11.8 star lies 1.6' NW.  Located 10' SE of mag 8.7 HD 153237.

 

Forms a pair with MCG +09-28-011 3' SSE.  The companion appeared faint, elongated 5:2 or 3:1 ~E-W, ~27"x9", low even surface brightness.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1237 = Sw. IX-71 on 23 Jun 1890 and recorded "eF, pL, lE, * nr p[receding]."  His position is 1.5' too far north, but the identification is certain.

******************************

 

IC 1238

17 00 30.2 +23 04 35; Her

V = 14.7/15.7;  Size 7"

 

24" (9/5/18): at 375x; IC 1238 is a faint double star of mag 14.7/15.7 at 7" separation.  Located midway between UGC 10650 4' NW and NGC 6276 4' SE.

 

UGC 10650 appeared very faint, moderately large, extremely thin edge-on SSW-NNE, ~45"x5", low surface brightness, slightly brighter core.  A mag 15.2 star is at the SSW tip.

 

Albert Marth discovered IC 1238 = m 327 on 10 Jun 1864 and simply noted as "eF".  Dreyer didn't include this object in the NGC due to a confusion with other nearby galaxies.  But his position corresponds with a faint double star.  Harold Corwin has the full story under NGC 6276.

******************************

 

IC 1239 = NGC 6276 = MCG +04-40-010 = CGCG 139-028 = PGC 59419

17 00 45.0 +23 02 39; Her

V = 14.6;  Size 0.6'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.2

 

See observing notes for NGC 6276.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1239 = Big. 213 on 19 Jun 1887.  Dreyer questioned if Bigourdan's object was equivalent to NGC 6276, discovered earlier by Marth as again by Stephan.  See NGC 6276 or Corwin notes for the story on that number.

******************************

 

IC 1241 = UGC 10670 = CGCG 321-011 = KAZ 445 = PGC 59452

17 01 28.2 +63 41 28 ; Dra

V = 13.6;  Size 1.2'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 165°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint or moderately bright, irregularly round, ~0.6' diameter.  Appears lumpy with direct vision but I didn't see a distinct nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1241 = Sw. VII-87 on 19 July 1887 and recorded "eF; pS; R."  His position is at the north edge of UGC 10670 and the identification is certain.

******************************

 

IC 1242 = MCG +01-44-001 = CGCG 054-002 = PGC 59688

17 08 42.9 +04 03 00; Oph

V = 13.7;  Size 0.9'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 130°

 

17.5" (7/19/90): very faint, very small, slightly elongated NW-SE, weak concentration.  Forms a pair with NGC 6296 10' S.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1242 = J. 1-383 on 7 Aug 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1243

17 10 24.5 +10 46 06; Oph

Size 50"

 

24" (7/18/17): at 375x; IC 1243 is a fairly striking N-S chain of 5 stars (all resolved) as well as a 6th star close W.  The N-S chain extends 48" and all 4 stars are mag 14-15.  Located 32' WNW of mag 5.3 HD 155644.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1243 = Sw. IX-72 on 15 May 1890 and reported "pF; pS; vE; r."  There is nothing at his position but Howe examined the field on two nights in 1898 and found "five 12-14 mag. stars in a line, at an angle of 0 degrees [N-S], the length of the line being 45".  A star of mag. 14 immediately precedes the northern end of the row."  This asterism is 3' SW of Swift's position.  Based on my observation, I'm surprised Swift didn't at least partially resolve this chain.

 

******************************

 

IC 1244 = UGC 10739 = MCG +06-38-003 = CGCG 198-015 = PGC 59746

17 10 33.7 +36 18 12; Her

V = 13.4;  Size 1.0'x1.0'

 

24" (7/18/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, small bright core, 30" diameter.  A mag 15 star is near the south edge [24" from center] and an 11th mag star is 2' WNW.  Located 38' NE of mag 5.4 HD 155103 and 1° SE of mag 3.1 Pi Her.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1244 = Sw. VIII-92 = Sw. IX-73 on 13 May 1889 and reported "vF; pS iR; bet. a F and a pB *; 3 st in line nr."  His position is 12 seconds of RA west (2.5') of UGC 10739 and his description fits.  He found this galaxy again on 15 Sep 1889 and reported it as new in his 9th list with description "pF; pS; R; bet. 2 st."  His position was 6' too far south, but matches in RA.  UGC fails to identify its UGC 10739 as IC 1244.

******************************

 

IC 1245 = UGC 10755 = MCG +06-38-007 = CGCG 198-022 = PGC 59835

17 12 36.6 +38 01 14; Her

V = 13.7;  Size 1.7'x0.9';  PA = 126°

 

24" (7/18/17): at 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, elongated 4:3 NW-SE, ~40"x30", broad mild concentration.  A mag 10.3 star (SAO 65873) is 4' E.

 

CGCG 198-024, located 8' NE, appeared faint, very small, round, 15" diameter. A mag 13 star is 0.6' NW.  CGCG 198-025, located 15' SE, appeared faint to fairly faint, small, round, 20" diameter, quasi-stellar nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1245 = Sw. IX-75 on 15 Sep 1889 and reported "eF; S; R; BM; F * close s; 3 or 4 others nr. n."  His position is 1.5' too far NW, within his usual positional errors.

******************************

 

IC 1248 = UGC 10756 = MCG +10-24-106 = CGCG 299-059 = KAZ 455 = PGC 59740 = PGC 59791

17 11 40.2 +59 59 44; Dra

V = 14.2;  Size 1.0'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 17°

 

24" (7/20/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, irregularly round, ~35"x30", broad weak concentration but no distinct core or zones.  Overall fairly low surface brightness.

 

I picked up a close double 10' WNW, which is listed in WDS as TDT 244 = 11.9/12.4 at 2.4".  It was just resolved cleanly at 375x.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1248 = Sw. VII-88 on 19 Jul 1887 and reported "eeF; pS; R; betw 2 st p & f."  There's nothing at his position but 7.7' NNE is this galaxy and the two stars in the description match the sky.  PGC has a separate entry, PGC 59740, for KAZ 455, but this is a duplicate of IC 1248.

******************************

 

IC 1249 = CGCG 198-026 = PGC 59919

17 14 55.1 +35 31 12; Her

V = 14.6;  Size 0.4'x0.4'

 

24" (7/18/17): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, round, 20"-24" diameter, fairly low and nearly even surface brightness.  A mag 15.5 star is close north [34" from the center].  A distinctive 6' string consisting of a mag 10 star and 3 mag 11 stars extends south [nearest star in string is 4' S].

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1249 = Sw. IX-76 and reported "eeeF; pS; R; eee diff.; 4 pB st. nr. in line s."  A mag 15.5 star is close N [].

******************************

 

IC 1250 = 2MASX J17142919+5724597 = LEDA 2565010

17 14 29.2 +57 25 00; Dra

V = 15.1;  Size 0.6'x0.3';  PA = 70°

 

24" (7/21/17): at 375x; faint, extremely small, round, 8"-10" diameter.  I could easily hold this faint galaxy continuously with averted (V = 15.1) as the surface brightness is moderately high.  Located 7.3' W of NGC 6338 in a compact galaxy group.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1250 = Sw. IX-77 on 23 Jun 1890 and reported "pF; S; cE."  His position is within 30" of LEDA 2565010, though I have concerns about this identification as his description doesn't seem appropriate. LEDA 2565010 is quite faint (V ~15), so I would expect Swift to have called it “eeF” or “eeeF”, instead of “pF”. Also visually only the 12" core was seen, yet his description says “cE".  The same night he discovered IC 1237, which he called “eF”. Yet IC 1237 appeared much brighter visually (at least a magnitude) than IC 1250.  But I don’t see another good candidate for the identification of IC 1250, unless his observation refers to NGC 6338, which is roughly a minute of RA east. Harold Corwin agrees with my brightness and elongation discrepancies and is placing colons (uncertainty) on the position in his IC table.

******************************

 

IC 1251 = UGC 10757 = MCG +12-16-021 = PGC 59735

17 10 13.4 +72 24 37; Dra

V = 13.5;  Size 1.4'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 70°

 

17.5" (7/16/93): faint, fairly small, slightly elongated 4:3 ~E-W, fairly low almost even surface brightness.  Located in a string of stars that ends at the double star adjacent to NGC 6340 6' SSE.  IC 1254 lies 6' E.

 

17.5" (7/9/88): very faint, small, elongated WSW-ENE, weak concentration.  Located 6' NNW of NGC 6340 in a group.

 

Edward Swift, Lewis' 19 year-old son, discovered IC 1251 = Sw. X-43 on 18 Sep 1890 and recorded "eeeF; pS; R; 6340 nr; sp of 2 [with IC 1254]; ee dif."  The Swifts' RA is 6 sec too large and the orientation should by north-preceding and south-following.

******************************

 

IC 1252 = IC 4649 = UGC 10788 = MCG +10-24-120 = CGCG 299-068 = WBL 636-006 = PGC 59962

17 15 50.4 +57 22 01; Dra

V = 14.5;  Size 1.0'x0.2';  PA = 142°

 

24" (7/21/17): at 375x; faint, fairly small, very elongated 4:1 NW-SE, ~0.6'x0.15'.  Situated 24" W of a mag 13 star and 4.6' SE of NGC 6338 in a compact galaxy group.  A mag 14.5-15 star is off the NW tip.

 

18" (7/12/07): extremely faint, small, very low surface brightness, ~0.3' diameter.  Attached to the west side of a mag 12 star (just 24" separation between the star and the center of IC 1252) that detracts from viewing.  Located 4.5' SE of NGC 6345 in a group and 3.6' ENE of NGC 6345.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1252 = Big. 217 on 5 Sep 1888 and logged "mag 13.4-13.5; 40" diameter; situated very close to a mag 12.5 star."  Harold Corwin notes that IC 4649 is a duplicate identity from a second observation from Bigourdan.  See Corwin's identification notes.

******************************

 

IC 1253 = NGC 6347 = UGC 10807 = MCG +03-44-004 = CGCG 111-021 = PGC 60086

17 19 54.7 +16 39 39; Her

V = 13.7;  Size 1.2'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 100°

 

See observing notes for NGC 6347.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1253 = Sf. 29 on 6 Jun 1866.  His position is accurate. Édouard Stephan independently rediscovered the galaxy on 6 Jul 1880.  Stephan's X-55 became NGC 6347 as Safford's discovery was not published until 1887, too late to be incorporated into the main NGC table. Harold Corwin notes that Dreyer made an error of 2° in declination when he precessed Safford's (correct) position but NGC 6347 = IC 1253.

******************************

 

IC 1254 = UGC 10769 = MCG +12-16-024 = PGC 59783

17 11 33.7 +72 24 07; Dra

V = 13.8;  Size 1.6'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 32°

 

17.5" (7/16/93): faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 SW-NE, even surface brightness.  Slightly fainter than IC 1251 6' W.  Located 7' NE of NGC 6340.

 

17.5" (7/9/88): extremely faint, very small, slightly elongated, two mag 15 stars are 30" E and 1' SSE.  Located 7' NE of NGC 6340 in a group.  Probably only viewed the core.

 

Edward Swift, Lewis' 19 year-old son, discovered IC 1254 on 18 Sep 1890 and recorded "eeeF; pS; R; nf of 2 [with IC 1251]; ee diff."  The Swifts' position is 16 sec of RA east and 2' north of UGC 10769.

******************************

 

IC 1255 = UGC 10826 = MCG +02-44-003 = CGCG 082-023 = PGC 60180

17 23 05.4 +12 41 44; Oph

Size 1.0'x0.5';  PA = 11°

 

24" (7/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 4:3 SSW-NNE, 32"x24", contains a very small bright core that seems offset to the south side.  A mag 15.1 star is just off the northeast edge.  The galaxy forms the northeast vertex of a quadrilateral with a mag 12 star 2.4' W, a mag 11.5 star 2.3' SSE and a mag 10.5 star 3.5' SW.

 

CGCG 082-026, located 14' ESE, appeared fairly faint, very small, slightly elongated E-W, 15"x9", fairly high surface brightness.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1255 = Sw. X-45 on 5 Jun 1891 and reported "vF; pS; R; Trapezium with 3 stars."   His position is 2' too far south but the identification is certain based on his description of the 3 nearby stars.

******************************

 

IC 1256 = UGC 10829 = MCG +04-41-007 = CGCG 140-017 = PGC 60203

17 23 47.3 +26 29 11; Her

V = 13.2;  Size 1.6'x1.1';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 95°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint, moderately large; slightly elongated E-W, ~40"x30", slightly brighter core.  Irregular halo with averted suggesting a spiral.  Located 2' NE of a mag 10.3 star. Two mag 14.0/14.8 stars are just off the southeast side [50" and 1.1' SE of center].

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1256 = J. 1-384 on 29 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1257 = OCL-51 = Lund 751 = Ced 144

17 27 08.5 -07 05 35; Oph

V = 13.1;  Size 1';  Surf Br = 2.3

 

24" (7/11/18): at 200x and 226x; fairly faint, small, round, low surface brightness, very small slightly brighter core, 0.6' diameter.  Better at 282x; easily visible steadily though no additional structure. Less contrast at 375x.

 

18" (7/26/06): picked up at 225x, but viewed at 325x as a very faint, low surface brightness disc of 30" diameter with only a very weak central brightening.  This challenging globular was visible steadily, even with direct vision but there was no hints of details.  A couple of mag 16-16.5 threshold stars are close south and west.

 

18" (7/18/04): at 250x, appeared very faint, very small, round, ~0.5' diameter.  With direct vision, this globular is weakly concentrated to a faint quasi-stellar or stellar core.  Visible continuously without much effort, though very unimpressive as a globular.

 

17.5" (6/30/00): at 280x this small low surface brightness globular appeared very faint, round, ~30" diameter but visible with direct vision.  Appears to have an extremely faint knot at the south edge and a slight central brightening.

 

17.5" (7/27/95): very faint, round patch, ~1' diameter.  Appears similar to a 15th magnitude galaxy with no hints of resolution or central concentration.  Can hold steadily with averted vision.  Located 5.8' W of a mag 11.5 star.  Discovered to be a globular in 1996.

 

13.1": not found.

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1257 on 7 July 1890 while searching for Barnard's Comet C/1888 RI using the 27" refractor at Wien University Observatory in Austria.  His micrometric position is accurate.  Barnard independently discovered it the next night while searching for his comet with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  In fact, Barnard initially mistook it for the comet!

 

Harlow Shapley listed IC 1257 as an open cluster (1930) and Sven Cederblad as a nebula (1946).  Brian Skiff reports in 9/96: Barry Madore to take a handful of short exposures of it at the Palomar 200", and has run through a first-cut data reduction.  The color-magnitude diagram shows that it is unquestionably a globular cluster, which is moderately heavily reddened:  it has the telltale marks of a metal-poor halo cluster, which are (a) a blue horizontal-branch population and (b) a steep red-giant branch.  See Harris et al. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AJ....113..688H for the discovery announcement.

******************************

 

IC 1258 = Arp 311 NED1 = UGC 10867 = MCG +10-25-035 = CGCG 300-029 = PGC 60320 = VV 101

17 27 17.4 +58 29 08; Dra

V = 13.5;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 65°

 

24" (7/22/14): at 375x appeared faint to fairly faint, elongated 4:3 WSW-ENE, ~0.4'x0.3'.  A mag 15.3 star is off the north side [27" from center] and another mag 15 star is off the southwest side [44" from center].  At 500x, a mag 15.5+ star is at the east edge, just 10" from center!

 

24" (8/15/12): at 375x appeared fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated WSW-ENE, very small bright nucleus increases to center.  The view with confusing with several very close stars.  The brightest is a mag 14.9 star 45" SW.  A mag 15.2 star is 30" NNE.  A mag 15.7 star is attached at the east edge of the core, just 10" from center and fainter than the nucleus of the galaxy.  Very interesting group with the double system IC 1259 2.3' NE, IC 1260 2.0' ESE and PGC 2579433 3.6' ENE.

 

18" (6/7/08): at 260x appeared faint, small, irregularly round, 25" diameter, very small brighter core, gradually increases to the center.  Surrounded by two or three very faint stars.  With averted vision the shape is irregular and knotty.  Forms a pair with IC 1259 (double system) 2.2' NE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1258 = Sw. VII-89, along with IC 1259, on 19 Jul 1887 and logged "pB; pS; R; sp of 2 [with IC 1259]."  His position is 1' too far northwest.

******************************

 

IC 1259 = VV 101 = Arp 310 = Arp 311 NED2 = Arp 311 NED3 = UGC 10869 = CGCG 300-030 = MCG +10-25-037 = PGC 60323 = PGC 60325

17 27 25.8 +58 31 00; Dra

V = 13.1;  Size 1.1'x1.1';  Surf Br = 13.2

 

24" (7/22/14): at 375x, the merged contact pair IC 1259 (15" between centers) was a striking sight.  VV 101a, the larger and brighter eastern component, appeared fairly faint, small, round, 18" diameter.  A mag 15 star is at the southeast edge, just 10" from center.  VV 101b, the western component, appeared very faint, extremely small, 8" x 5" SW-NE.  A mag 12 star lies 0.8' NE.  IC 1258 lies 2.2' SW and IC 1260 is 2.5' SSE!

 

24" (8/15/12): fascinating tight double system and superimposed star at 375x.  The main component appeared fairly faint, small, round, 20" diameter.  VV 101b is attached at the west edge of the halo, 15" between centers.  It appeared very faint, extremely small, 10" diameter.  A mag 15 star is attached at the SE edge, just 10" from center!  A mag 12 star lies 0.8' NE.  IC 1258 lies 2.2' SW, IC 1260 is 2.5' SSE and PGC 2579433 is 2.5' SE.  The group is located ~13' SE of mag 6.5 HD 158485.

 

18" (6/7/08): at 260x this double system (Arp 310) appeared faint, very small, ~20" diameter, quasi-stellar nucleus.  VV 101b, an extremely small (~10" diameter) companion, was barely resolved off the west edge of the brighter eastern component (VV 101a).  Also, a very faint mag 15 star is often visible at the SE edge.  IC 1258 (part of Arp 311) is just 2.2' SW.  Located 45" SW of a mag 12 star.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1259 = Sw. VII-90, along with IC 1258, on 19 Jul 1887 and logged "pB; pS; R; nf of 2 [with IC 1258]."  Swift didn't resolve this double system.

******************************

 

IC 1260 = Arp 311 NED4 = MCG +10-25-040 = CGCG 300-032 = PGC 60324

17 27 31.7 +58 28 33; Dra

V = 14.9;  Size 0.35'x0.3'

 

24" (7/22/14): faint to fairly faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  Located 2' ESE of IC 1258 and 2.6' SSE of IC 1259 = Arp 310 (close double system!).  The entire group forms Arp 311.

 

24" (8/15/12): faint, very small, round, 12"-15" diameter.  Faintest of trio of IC galaxies with IC 1258 and IC 1259 (forming Arp 311) and situated just 1.9' ESE of IC 1258.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1260 = Sw. IX-80 on 15 May 1890 and logged "eeeF; S; R; forms equilateral triangle with two others; 3rd of 3."  Three years earlier he found IC 1258 and IC 1259, so he apparently revisited the group and detected this galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1261 = CGCG 339-039 = MCG +12-16-032 = PGC 60185 = PGC 60186

17 23 23.3 +71 15 49; Dra

V = 14.0

 

24" (6/28/16): IC 1261 is a close pair of small ellipticals separated by 27" E-W.  At 375x the brighter eastern component appeared fairly faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  The halo is just resolved from the western component, which appeared faint, very small, round.  A mag 15 star is 0.7' S.  NGC 6395 lies 18' SE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1261 = Sw. VIII-93 on 8 Sep 1888 and recorded "eeF; pS; R; in a dark vacancy."  His position is unusually accurate for observations near the end of his observing career, but the description could apply to either galaxy (or both).

******************************

 

IC 1262 = UGC 10900 = MCG +07-36-020 = CGCG 226-020 = WBL 643-001 = PGC 60479

17 33 02.0 +43 45 35; Her

V = 13.7;  Size 1.2'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 83°

 

24" (7/2/16): at 375x; moderately bright, elongated 4:3 or 3:2 E-W, 1.0'x0.7', slightly brighter core.  Brightest in the IC 1262 group (redshift-based distance ~450 million l.y.) with closest companion IC 1263 3.8' NNE

 

24" (6/30/16): at 322x; moderately bright and large, oval 3:2 E-W, ~1.1'x0.75', large brighter core.  Brightest in a group with IC 1263 3.8' NNE, CGCG 226-028 10' NNE and IC 1264 8' SSE.  This group resides in a fairly rich star field.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1262 = Sw. IX-82, along with IC 1263 and 1264, on 19 Jun 1890.  He recorded "eF; pS; R; 1st of 3."  His position is less than 1' too far north.

******************************

 

IC 1263 = UGC 10902 = MCG +07-36-021 = CGCG 226-026 = WBL 643-002 = PGC 60481

17 33 07.2 +43 49 19; Her

V = 13.7;  Size 1.7'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 178°

 

24" (7/2/16): at 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, moderately large, elongated 2:1 N-S, 0.9'x0.4'.  A thin spiral arm is just visible extending due north on the east side of the halo!

 

IC 1262 (brightest in the group) is 3.8' SSW and CGCG 226-028 is 6' NNE.   The latter galaxy appeared faint, small, round, 20" diameter, no core or zones.  A mag 15.5 star is just off the southwest edge [35" from center].

 

24" (6/30/16): at 322x; fairly faint or moderately bright, relatively large, elongated at least 5:2 N-S, broad concentration, brighter core, 1.2'x0.45'.  Several mag 11-13 stars are nearby including a mag 11 star 2.6' WNW and a mag 11.5 star 3' NW.

 

IC 1263 is a member of the IC 1262 group that includes CGCG 226-028 6' NNE, IC 1262 3.8' SSW and IC 1264 12' S.  CGCG 226-028 appeared faint, small, round, 20" diameter, no core or zones.  A mag 14.6 star is 1.2' NNW and a mag 15.5 star is just 35" SW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1263 = Sw. IX-83, along with IC 1262 and 1264, on 19 Jun 1890.  He recorded "eF; pS; R; 2nd of 3."  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1264 = UGC 10904 = MCG +07-36-022 = CGCG 226-027 = WBL 643-003 = PGC 60484

17 33 16.8 +43 37 45; Her

V = 14.4;  Size 1.2'x1.1';  PA = 40°

 

24" (7/2/16"): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 SW-NE, 35"x20", fairly even surface brightness, slightly brighter core.  Faintest of three IC's anchoring a group, with IC 1262 8' NNW and IC 1263 12' NNW.

 

MCG +07-36-024, just 0.9' NE, appeared fairly faint, small, round, 10", higher surface brightness than IC 1264.  A mag 14 star is 45" E and a mag 16 star is barely off the northwest edge.

 

24" (6/30/16): at 322x; fairly faint, moderately large, elongated 4:3 SW-NE, 40"x30", fairly low surface brightness.  Forms a close pair with MCG +07-36-024 0.9' NE.  The companion is fairly faint, small, round, 12", with a mag 16 star at the northwest edge.  IC 1264 is a member of the IC 1262 group and is situated 8' SSE of IC 1262.  CGCG 226-029 is 7.6' ENE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1264 = Sw. IX-84, along with IC 1263 and 1264, on 19 Jun 1890.  He recorded "eeeF; pS; R; 3rd of 3; eee difficult."  His position is less than 1' too far north.  I'm surprised Swift missed the nearby MCG as it has a higher surface brightness.

******************************

 

IC 1265 = UGC 10917 = MCG +07-36-027 = CGCG 226-032 = PGC 60568

17 36 39.6 +42 05 17; Her

V = 12.3;  Size 2.0'x0.9';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 80°

 

17.5" (7/27/95): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 E-W, 1.2'x0.5'.  Contains a bright core with faint extensions.  A wide pair of mag 14.5 stars lie 1.0' E and 1.3' ESE of center.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1265 = Sw. IX-85 on 10 Jul 1890 and recorded "eeF; S; lE."  Discovered by Swift (IX).  His position is 1' too far north.

******************************

 

IC 1266 = PK 345-8.1 = Thackery 1 = ESO 279-7 = PN G345.2-08.8

17 45 35.4 -46 05 23; Ara

V = 12.2;  Size 13"

 

13.1": not found.  Very low emission.

 

Williamina Fleming discovered IC 1266 in 1894 on a photograph of stellar spectra taken at the Peruvian Station of the Harvard College Observatory.  Pickering announced the discovery in AN 3227.  Dana Patchick discovered that Tc 1 is identical to IC 1266.

******************************

 

IC 1267 = UGC 10937 = MCG +10-25-077 = CGCG 300-056 = PGC 60635

17 38 45.9 +59 22 23; Dra

V = 13.4;  Size 1.4'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 35°

 

24" (7/19/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated SW-NE, ~40"x32", weak concentration with small brighter core, occasionally brightens to a stellar nucleus.

 

IC 1267 is the brighter of a pair with MCG +10-25-078 2' SE.  The companion appeared faint, small, round, 12", could almost hold continuously with averted despite a faint V mag of 15.5.  Located 2' SE of IC 1267 and midway between a mag 14.4 star 40" SE and a mag 15 star 44" NW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1267 = Sw. VII-91 on 19 Jul 1887 and reported "eeF; pS; R; ee diff[icult]."  His position is 1' NW of this galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1268 = MCG +03-45-036 = CGCG 112-057 = PGC 60971

17 50 39.3 +17 12 34; Her

V = 14.7;  Size 0.65'x0.5';  PA = 117°

 

24" (7/19/17): at 282x; faint to fairly faint, slightly elongated, 25" diameter.  A very faint star is involved (NW edge?).  Located 20' S of NGC 6467.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1268 = Sw. VII-92 on 16 May 1888 and recorded "eeeF; pS; R; ee diff."  His position is 15 seconds too small in RA but accurate in Dec.  Howe measured an accurate position in 1900 (repeated in the IC 2 Notes section).

******************************

 

IC 1269 = UGC 11013 = MCG +04-42-009 = CGCG 141-020 = PGC 61023

17 52 06.0 +21 34 11; Her

V = 12.8;  Size 1.7'x1.3';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 125°

 

18" (7/2/08): at 175x appeared fairly faint, moderately large, elongated 4:3 NW-SE, slightly brighter core.  Bracketed by mag 13 stars 1.4' N and 1.4' NE as well as a mag 13 star 1.2' SE.  Located 4.2' NNE of a mag 10.2 star.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1269 = Sw. VII-94 on 25 Jul 1887 and logged "eeF; pL; R; F * v nr nf; and other F * nr."  There is nothing at his position but 19 seconds of time preceding and 2' north is UGC 11013.  Herbert Howe has a long note on IC 1269 in his November 1900 list of observations in Monthly Notices.  He notes the position given in the IC differs from his by 20 seconds and 2', and he was unable to verify Swift's description of "pL, 2 F st nr."  Instead, he found an "eeF, vS" nebula with a number of faint stars near.  This is very likely the same galaxy, except Howe only noticed the nucleus.

******************************

 

IC 1270 = NGC 6488 = MCG +10-25-098 = CGCG 300-076 = PGC 60918

17 49 20.8 +62 13 22; Dra

V = 13.8;  Size 0.7'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.6

 

See observing notes for NGC 6488.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1270 = Sw. VII-93 on 11 Jun 1888.  This observation is likely a rediscovery of NGC 6488, originally found by Swift on 1 Sep 1888.  See NGC 6488 for the story.

******************************

 

IC 1271

18 05 10.1 -24 23 56; Sgr

 

17.5" (6/14/96): the brightest mag 7.5 star at the east end of M8 illuminates a bright 2' halo of nebulosity.  This star is symmetrically placed on the following side of the cluster with respect to the two mag 7.5 stars on the west side of the Lagoon.

 

17.5" (6/8/96): this is the mag 7.5 star (SAO 186247) embedded in the southeast portion of the Lagoon nebula, which is surrounded by a locally brighter halo of nebulosity at all powers.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1271 = Sw. VIII-94 on 5 Aug 1888 and recorded "eeeF, vL, N6523 nr p, ee diff; B* inv or is a neb *; discovered 2 years ago."  His position is about 5' southeast of a mag 7 star at 18 05 10.6 -24 23 55 which is embedded in the eastern wing or extension of the Lagoon nebula.  Corwin notes that John Herschel discovered and sketched this extension and considered it part of the M8 complex.

 

Dreyer states in the 1912 update of WH's catalogues that IC 1271 is identical to NGC 6526 = H V-9  (also part of M8). See Corwin's identification notes on NGC 6526.

******************************

 

IC 1274 = Sh 2-32 = LBN 33 = Ced 154d = ESO 521-41

18 09 51.0 -23 38 54; Sgr

Size 9'x8'

 

17.5" (7/17/93): located north of the NGC 6559 nebular complex.  At 100x and OIII filter appears as an irregular nebulosity surrounding a group of stars mag 8-9, roughly circular outline.  Located about 20' N of NGC 6559.

 

17.5" (6/20/87): at 88x with UHC filter appears fairly faint, large, includes several stars with three or four brighter stars, irregular shape.  Located 22' NNW of NGC 6559.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1274, along with IC 1275, on 25 Jun 1892 on a 4-hour plate using the 6-inch Willard lens.  His article "Photographic Nebulosities and Groups of Nebulous Stars" in AN 3111 includes a rough visual sketch (with the Lick 12" refractor) of the field including NGC 6559 to the south.

******************************

 

IC 1275 = Sh 2-31 = LBN 33 = Ced 154e = ESO 521-41

18 10 07.2 -23 45 40; Sgr

Size 10'x6'

 

17.5" (7/17/93): at 100x and OIII filter appears as an easy nebulosity surrounding two mag 9 stars and several fainter stars.  Located at the east end of the chain of nebulosities described in the NGC 6559 observation.

 

17.5" (6/20/87): at 88x and UHC filter; fairly faint nebulosity surrounding a pair of mag 8 stars, smaller than nearby IC 1274.  Located 16' N of NGC 6559.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1275, along with IC 1274, on 25 Jun 1892 on a 4-hour plate using the 6-inch Willard lens.  His article "Photographic Nebulosities and Groups of Nebulous Stars" in AN 3111 includes a visual sketch (with the Lick 12" refractor) of the field including NGC 6559 to the south.  IC 1274 and 1275 are clearly identified (as Nova) on the sketch.

******************************

 

IC 1276 = Palomar 7

18 10 44.3 -07 12 27; Ser

V = 10.3;  Size 7';  Surf Br = 3.3

 

24" (9/7/13): at 200x appeared as a fairly faint to moderately bright, roundish glow, ~3' diameter, with a weak concentration.  Grows in size with averted vision to at least 3.5' diameter.  At 375x, a total of 8-10 stars were resolved and a couple more occasionally popped.  The brightest is a mag 13-13.5 star on the west side and a mag 14 star 35" to its east.  A few additional stars appear to be ~15-15.5 magnitude with the remainder closer to 16th magnitude.  A mag 10.6 star is 3' NNE of center.

 

18" (6/22/09): at 225x appeared as a faint, moderately large, roundish glow with no central concentration.  A string of three stars are superimposed on the north side of the cluster.

 

17.5" (8/2/97): at 220x, this globular appears as an obvious irregular glow of ~3' diameter with a mag 13.5 star at the west edge.  A superimposed mag 14 star follows [by 36"] and a third mag 14.5 on a line is at the east end.  A mag 15 star was also glimpsed along this string close following the mag 14 star. Appears elongated ~E-W and the irregular outline increases in size with averted vision to 4'x3'.  This faint globular has an unusual mottled patchy appearance although the observed stars may be field stars.

 

17.5" (7/27/95): at 220x appears faint, moderately large, 3' irregular scraggly outline.  No resolution although has an irregular surface brightness.  There is a mag 13 star at the west end, closely followed by a mag 14.5 star.  A similar faint star is situated at the east end.  Located 3' SSW of a mag 11 star.

 

17.5" (7/4/86): at 105x appears as a faint glow with no central condensation.  Two stars mag 13-14 are on the west side.  At 286x the cluster seems to extend mostly east of the following of the two stars.  Located 3' SSW of a mag 11 star.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1276 = Sw. VIII-95 on 10 Apr 1889 and recorded "eeeF; vL; ee diff; D* close to p edge; very wide D* nr north."  George Abell found it again in 1952 on the POSS (published in the 1955 paper "Globular Clusters and Planetary Nebulae Discovered on the National Geographic Society-Palomar Observatory Sky Survey") and missed the equivalence with globular #7.  So, IC 1276 is also known as Palomar 7.

******************************

 

IC 1277 = UGC 11135 = MCG +05-43-005 = PGC 61491

18 10 27.3 +31 00 12; Her

V = 13.4;  Size 1.6'x1.4';  Surf Br = 14.1;  PA = 25°

 

17.5" (8/1/89): very faint, moderately large, very diffuse.  A double star mag 14/15 is off the southwest side [1.6' from center].  Forms a pair with NGC 6575 9' NE.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1277 = Big. 220 on 31 Aug 1888 and simply noted "faint stars" in his 1891 Comptes Rendus list. Harold Corwin states that Bigourdan has four observations of it; they do not agree very well, but his mean position is only 12 arcsec south of the nucleus. The identity is secure."

******************************

 

IC 1278

18 10 41.7 +31 09 00; Her

Size 22"

 

24" (9/5/18): at 375x; IC 1278 is a small asterism of 4-5 stars spanning only 22".  It was resolved into two easily visible mag 14.8 and 15.3 stars at the east and west end, respectively.  A third mag 16 star was occasionally visible and a fourth mag 16-16.5 star was suspected only.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1278 = Big. 220, along with IC 1277, on 31 Aug 188.  Bigourdan mentioned several stars were suspected and his position matches a small group of 4 stars.

******************************

 

IC 1279 = IC 1281 = UGC 11143 = MCG +06-40-009 = CGCG 200-009 = 2MFGC 14240 = PGC 61518

18 11 15.4 +36 00 28; Her

V = 13.5;  Size 2.6'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 159°

 

24" (9/28/19): at 260x; pretty edge-on at least 3:1 NNW-SSE, broad concentration to a brighter, elongated core region.  The galaxy precedes three mag 11-12 stars in a N-S string with the southern star an uncatalogued double stars (separation less than 5").

 

24" (6/29/16): at 200x; fairly faint, moderately large, nice edge-on 7:2 NNW-SSE, 1.2'x0.35', broad concentration to a bulging core.  Three mag 11.0-11.8 stars in a shallow arc follow by 3' and two mag 11.4/12.4 stars ~3' N are collinear with the galaxy.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1279 = Sw. VII-95 on 18 Oct 1887 and recorded "eeeF; pS; R; in a semicircle of st.; eee diff."  His position is 2.5' NW of UGC 11143 = PGC 61518 with the semicircle of stars mostly to the east.  He "discovered" this galaxy a second time on 28 May 1889 and recorded Sw. VIII-96 (later IC 1281) as "eeF S; cE; semicircle of several stars near following."  His published RA was 21 seconds too large, but again the description applies.  Dreyer catalogued the second observation as IC 1281, but queried "? = 1279".  Howe took a look at the field with the 20" refractor at Denver in 1899 and reported "I see only one nebula in the vicinity and call it 'vF, pS."

 

But Swift's second position happens to fall close to CGCG 200-010 = PGC 61527, a close pair of extremely small and faint galaxies, and Zwicky and Herzog identified this pair as IC 1279 in the CGCG (Volume III).  But Swift's description doesn't match this close pair as the "semicircle of several stars" is preceding (west), not following the pair.  PGC, as well as all online databases (NED, HyperLeda, SIMBAD) repeat the CGCG misidentification.  Harold Corwin recovered the identification IC 1279 = IC 1281 (first given by Dreyer in the IC 2 Notes).  See his notes.

******************************

 

IC 1280 = NGC 6581 = MCG +04-43-010 = CGCG 142-021 = PGC 61571

18 12 18.4 +25 39 44; Her

V = 14.5;  Size 0.7'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.5;  PA = 56°

 

17.5" (7/1/89): faint, small, round.  A mag 14.5 star is at the NE end and a mag 15 star at the south end.  Image confused by these two close faint stars.  A wide pair of stars is 12' SW.  Located in the UGC 11156 group and incorrectly identified as UGC 11155 in the RNGC.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1280 = B. 222 on 1 Jul 1886 while searching for NGC 6581, which was discovered by Stephan.  Due to an error in Stephan's position Bigourdan thought the nebula was new, but the position (and Stephan's description) clearly establishes NGC 6581 = IC 1280. MCG, CGCG and UGC label this galaxy IC 1280 and ignore the NGC designation.

******************************

 

IC 1281 = IC 1279 = UGC 11143 = MCG +06-40-009 = CGCG 200-009 = 2MFGC 14240 = PGC 61518

18 11 15.4 +36 00 28; Her

V = 13.5;  Size 2.6'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 159°

 

See observing notes for IC 1279.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1281 = Sw. VIII-96 on 28 May 1889 and recorded "eeF S; cE; semicircle of several stars near following."  His position falls close to CGCG 200-010 = PGC 61527, a close pair of extremely small and faint galaxies.  Zwicky and Herzog identified this pair as IC 1279 in the CGCG (Volume III) and other catalogues followed.  But Swift's description doesn't match this close pair as the "semicircle of several stars" is preceding (west), not following the pair.  PGC, as well as all online databases (NED, HyperLeda, SIMBAD) repeat the CGCG misidentification.

 

Harold Corwin concludes that IC 1281 is more likely a duplicate of IC 1279, discovered earlier by Swift on 18 Oct 1887.  Swift's RA for IC 1281 is 21 seconds too large, but his description applies.  Dreyer originally suggested the equivalence because Howe took a look at the field with the 20" refractor at Denver in 1899 and reported "I see only one nebula in the vicinity and call it 'vF, pS."  So, likely IC 1281 = IC 1279, and not CGCG 200-010.  See IC 1279 and Corwin's notes.

******************************

 

IC 1283 = LBN 47 = Ced 157c = Sh 2-37 = Gum 78 = RCW 153

18 17 18 -19 45; Sgr

Size 17'x15'

 

17.5" (7/26/95): at 100x unfiltered appears as a very faint, very large nebulosity, at least 10' diameter.  Encompasses a mag 9 star and extends about 10' NE to merge with IC 1284 surrounding mag 7.6 SAO 161273.  The illuminating star is 6' NE of reflection nebula NGC 6589 and 8' NNE of NGC 6590 = NGC 6595.

 

17.5" (6/20/87): at 88x and UHC filter appears as a very large, extensive nebulous region just NE of NGC 6589 and NGC 6595.  Has an elongated, irregular shape. Includes a mag 7.5 star near the north end.  IC 1284 is a connected portion.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1283 on the photographic plate taken with the 6" Willard in Jun 1892.  He commented that BD -19° 4948 is nebulous and "the nebulosity is very small and principally noticeable on the southern side of the [9.3 magnitude] star."  Megastar misidentifies IC 1283 as NGC 6595, which is identical to NGC 6590.

******************************

 

IC 1284 = Sh 2-37 = Gum 78 = RCW 153 = LBN 47 = Ced 157d = ESO 590-16

18 17 42 -19 40; Sgr

Size 17'x15'

 

17.5" (7/26/95): this is the northeastern section of the IC 1283/1284 nebulosity surrounding mag 7.6 SAO 161273.  Although brightest around the star, the nebula appears to nearly merge with IC 1283 stretching SW to a mag 9 star located 7' SW.  Located less than 15' NE of the bright reflection nebulae NGC 6589 and NGC 6595.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1284 on a photographic plate taken with the 6" Willard lends on 31 May 1892.  He noted "an unknown nebulous star [BD -19° 4953].  It is shown on the photograph to be nearly symmetrically surrounded with a faint diffused nebulosity about 15' in diameter.  Perhaps this nebulosity is a little denser and more extensive following.  Visually with the 12 inch, I cannot be certain of seeing the nebulosity on account of the brightness of the central star." He later described nearby IC 1283 in AN 3111.  Barnard's position matches the mag 7.6 star involved.

******************************

 

IC 1285

18 16 10 +25 06.1; Her

Size 0.6'

 

24" (8/12/18): at 375x; IC 1285 is an asterism of 4 stars within 30".  On the NW side are the brighter two; a 10" pair of mag 14.1 and 14.8.  Close east are two mag 15.5/15.7 stars are 18".  The faintest star (SE end) was difficult in fairly poor transparency due to wildfire smoke.  Located 6.6' NW of NGC 6602.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1285 = B. 224 on 8 Aug 1888 and logged a mag 13.3 star accompanied by a few additional fainter stars that perhaps might have some traces of nebulosity.  There is no nebulosity.  Just a small group of 4 stars.

******************************

 

IC 1286 = UGC 11191 = MCG +09-30-010 = CGCG 279-007 = PGC 61666

18 16 14.3 +55 35 28; Dra

V = 13.8;  Size 1.4'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 85°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint, moderately large, very elongated 4:1 E-W, ~50"x12", weak concentration.  Resides within a group of brighter stars, included a mag 10.3 star 2.4' N.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1286 = Sw. VII-96 on 11 Jun 1888 and recorded "eF; pS; R; nearly bet. 2 pB st[ars]."  His position is just off the east edge of UGC 11191 and the identification is certain (the mentioned stars are north and south).

******************************

 

IC 1287 = LBN 75 = Ced 163

18 31 18 -10 50; Sct

Size 44'x34'

 

18" (8/12/07): this was a difficult observation to confirm as this large, very faint reflection nebula is illuminated by mag 5.7 HD 170740 (unequal double ∑2325 = 5.9/9.2 at 12") and the bright star naturally has some surrounding scattered light.  Adding a wide bandpass Deep Sky filter the glow definitely brightened and increased in size.  The contrast improvement was easy to see by blinking with the filter.  It was difficult to estimate a size as the haze faded into the background, but appeared ~15'-20' in size.  Open cluster NGC 6649 lies 38' NE.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1287 on a plate taken with the 12" Willard lens on 29 Jun 1892.  He noted (AN 3111) "the 5.5 mag star BD -10° 4713 is shown to be nebulous.  The star is surrounded by a large diffused nebulosity, somewhat extended in a direction nf and sp.  A telescopic examination [probably with the 12" refractor] with a very low power confirms the photograph."  Base on photographs at the Helwan observatory in Egypt in 1919-20, it was described as "a very large patch of faint, diffuse nebulosity around Boss 4687 extending chiefly to the south of it.

******************************

 

IC 1288 = UGC 11256 = MCG +07-38-007 = PGC 61941

18 29 22.6 +39 42 47; Lyr

V = 13.4;  Size 1.1'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 2°

 

24" (7/19/17): at 375x; fairly faint, moderately large, very elongated 3:1 N-S.  Resides within a group of stars including a mag 15 star at the north tip [22" from center].  Also nearby is a mag 12.7 star [49" from center] and a mag 12 star 1' due W.  Located 10' SSW of NGC 6646 in a triple group (physical) with IC 1289.

 

13.1" (7/20/85): faint, thin edge-on N-S.  A number of stars are near; two mag 11/13 stars are 1.1' W and 1.4' WNW of center.  A mag 12 star is close NE, 0.8' from center, and a mag 15 star is at the north tip 22" from center.  Located 9' SSW of NGC 6646 in a trio with IC 1289.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1288 = Sw. VII-97 on 19 Oct 1887 and recorded "vF; S; lE; nearly between a double and a single star."

******************************

 

IC 1289 = MCG +07-38-009 = CGCG 228-011 = PGC 61958

18 30 02.3 +39 57 51; Lyr

V = 14.4;  Size 0.7'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 145°

 

24" (7/19/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated NW-SE, weak concentration.  A very faint mag 15.8 star is at the south edge.  A mag 8.8 star is 6' WSW.  Located 7.5' NE of NGC 6846 in a trio with IC 1288.

 

13.1" (7/20/85): extremely faint, fairly small, diffuse, very low even surface brightness, possibly elongated.  Located 7.5' NE of NGC 6646 in a trio with IC 1288.  A mag 8.5 star lies 5.8' SW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1289 = Sw. VII-98 on 19 Oct 1887 and recorded "eeeF; pS; lE; 3 stars in line point to it."  His position is 2.8' too far northwest.  The "3 stars in line point to it" likely refer to a collinear trio that starts 3' SE.

******************************

 

IC 1291 = UGC 11283 = MCG +08-34-004 = CGCG 255-006 = KAZ 486 = PGC 62049

18 33 52.7 +49 16 42; Dra

V = 13.0;  Size 1.8'x1.5';  Surf Br = 13.9;  PA = 30°

 

24" (7/19/17): at 375x; fairly faint, moderately large, irregular shape.  Two 15th magnitude stars are superimposed [separation 11" on DSS2] with a weak core just to the northwest of these stars.  The glow elongates further to the NW of the core [this is the central bar].  An extremely small HII knot, ~5" diameter, occasionally popped in the same position near the NW end of the "bar" [18" NW of center].  There was a hint of an arm curling further northward towards a mag 13.5 star [0.8' NNE of center].  A mag 13 star is 1' WNW and two mag 11.5 stars further NW are collinear with the galaxy.

 

LEDA 214690 was glimpsed 3.7' NE.  At 375x it appeared extremely faint (B ~16.7), very small, round, 12" diameter.  It only occasionally popped with averted vision but verified as the position was consistent.

 

24" (9/10/15): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 NW-SE, increases in length with averted vision to ~40"x16".  Appears to have a very faint quasi-stellar nucleus, along with a faint superimposed star very close southeast.  A mag 13.5 star is less than 1' N of center.  An HII region in the northwest spiral arm was not seen, though the transparency was fairly poor.  Two mag 11-11.5 star lie 2.4' and 3.4' NNW (collinear with the galaxy) and a mag 9.8 star is 4.2' SW.  Situated in a busy star field.

 

17.5" (7/24/95): very faint, small, irregular glow of 30" diameter.  Appears to have no core but there are one or two extremely faint mag 15.5-16 stars superimposed on the south end.  Nearly collinear with two mag 10.5-11 stars 2.3' and 3.3' NNW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1291 = Sw. X-46 on 5 Jun 1891 and recorded "eF; vS; R; F * close N."  His position is 13 seconds of RA too far west and 2.3' too far north (3.3' NW of the galaxy).  Herbert Howe, in his survey of NGC and IC objects around 1900, mentions he was unable to see a "F * close N", though noted two 12th mag star north-following and north-preceding.   But Swift was probably referring to the star less than 1' NNE, which is closer to mag 13.5.  Howe also measured an accurate position that was repeated in the IC 2 notes section.

******************************

 

IC 1293

18 41 37.2 +56 19 06; Dra

Size 0.5'

 

24" (7/19/17): at 282x; this asterism consists of four mag 15-15.5 stars in a 30" string ~N-S.  Three of the stars were easily resolved, while the 4th (2nd from north) was difficult.  Also a 14th mag star is 0.6' NW of the string.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1293 = Sw. VIII-97 on 29 Aug 1888 and reported "eeeF; S; lE; * in center;  ? D[ouble]; another nr. suspected sf."  His position matches a 30" string of 4 stars with two other stars nearby.  In his review of NGC and IC objects, Howe reported "It appears to consist of 3 stars of mag. 14 of which the following one is nebulous''.

******************************

 

IC 1295 = PK 25-4.2 = PN G025.4-04.7

18 54 36.5 -08 49 49; Sct

V = 12.5;  Size 102"x87"

 

24" (8/12/15): At 220x + UHC filter, the rim was clearly brighter, particularly along the south side.  But the west side of the planetary was weaker with a darker indentation, creating a "C" appearance, open to the west. A very faint, fairly thin outer shell was visible with careful viewing.  This envelope was roughly the thickness of the brighter rim.  Increasing to 375x and removing the filter, I counted 8 or 9 superimposed stars including several around or just off the edge. The stellar planetary K 4-8 lies just 4.7' NW in the same high power field and NGC 6712 is 24' WNW in the same low power field.

 

K4-8 was easily visible unfiltered as a mag 14.5 "star", the middle of 5 stars in a shallow 51" arc, concave to the northwest. Excellent contrast gain adding a UHC filter at 220x, so it was very easy to identify.

 

33" (9/16/07): at 200x appeared weakly annular with a slightly darker hole in the center and slightly brighter rim except on the west edge where there was an indentation or darker notch taking a small bite out of the rim.

 

18" (7/22/06): at 220x and UHC filter this fairly bright, large planetary was crisp-edged, slightly elongated ~E-W, ~1.5x1.3' in size.  The rim appeared slightly brighter, particularly along the south side giving a weak impression of annularity.  Several stars bracket the planetary and four or five mag 14-15.5 stars appear within the disc at 325x without a filter.  I viewed this object along with NGC 6712 and the stellar planetary K 4-8 in the same low power field of view!

 

17.5" (6/30/00): fairly bright at 220x using a UHC filter as a roundish disc, ~1.6'x1.4'.  The surface brightness is irregular and it appears slightly brighter along the southwest and northwest portion of the rim.  The unfiltered view at 280x also reveals a mottled appearance with a mag 13.5-14 star situated right at the west edge and a mag 14.5 star in the interior (a bit offset from center).  A couple of extremely faint stars are at the following edge. Located 24' ESE of NGC 6712.

 

17.5" (5/10/86): bright, large, round, 1.5' diameter.  Very pretty at 220x, estimate V = 12.0-12.5.  The stellar planetary K 4-8 is just 4.6' WNW.

 

13.1" (7/27/84): the rim on the south or SW side appears brighter but no definite annularity was seen.

 

13.1" (8/15/82): fairly faint, appears slightly elongated in an E-W orientation.

 

8" (6/27/81): faint, round, fairly small.  Located 25' ESE of NGC 6712 in the same low power field.  Observation mentioned in 10/81 S&T for smallest scope!

 

5": visible with a 5" stop on my 13.1" without filter and easy with UHC at 79x!

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1295 = Sf 82 on 28 Aug 1867 with the 18.5-inch Clark refractor at Dearborn Observatory in Chicago and recorded "pB, pL, gbM."  Heber Curtis first recognized it as a planetary nebula in 1919.  Burnham's Celestial Handbook and the Sky Atlas 2000.0 mislabel this planetary as IC 1298.

 

In 1919, Heber Curtis reported it was undoubtedly a planetary nebula based on a Crossley photograph and described it as "Exceedingly faint; a faint, hazy ring about 2' x 1.5' in p. a. 90°Ī. The central portions are relatively vacant, and it is fainter along and at the ends of the major axis. There are three faint stars at the center, of which one is probably the central star."

******************************

 

IC 1296 = UGC 11374 = MCG +06-41-022 = CGCG 201-040 = PGC 62532

18 53 18.8 +33 03 58; Lyr

V = 14.0;  Size 1.1'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 80°

 

48" (4/1/11): at 375x this low surface brightness galaxy near M57 was visible with direct vision as a faint, fairly small, round, glow with a very small bright core and diffuse halo.  At 488x it appeared fairly faint, fairly small, 40" diameter with a round, very small bright nucleus.  Surprisingly, two faint, spiral arms were just visible extending from the nucleus!  A brighter arm is attached at the south side and winds counterclockwise towards the southwest.  It was often visible with averted vision.  The fainter arm on the north side curving northeast required more effort and was only occasionally visible but confirmed.  A mag 13.8 star is close preceding (26" W of center).

 

17.5" (7/5/86): extremely faint, small, round, very low surface brightness.  This difficult galaxy is situated just 4' NW of M57!  Located along the north side of a small rhombus of mag 13-14 stars with sides of 1.5'.  IC 1296 is just 30" ESE of a mag 14 star.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1296 visually on 2 Oct 1893 with the Lick 36-inch refractor.  His description in AN 3200 reads "this nebula is about 1/2' diameter.  Not round.  A little brighter in the middle.  About 14th magnitude." His position matches this faint spiral, located just 4' NW of M57.

 

In a paper written by James Keeler in 1899 ("The Ring Nebula in Lyra"), he noted "Barnards small nebula.—The negative obtained with two hours’ exposure shows that the small nebula discovered by Professor Barnard with the 36-inch refractor in 1893 is a left- handed, two-branched spiral. The extreme diameter on the photograph is about 30."

******************************

 

IC 1297 = PK 358-21.1 = ESO 337-20 = RU CrA = PN G358.3-21.6

19 17 23.5 -39 36 46; CrA

V = 10.7;  Size 11"x9"

 

13.1" (8/8/86): bright, small, 10"-15" diameter, slight bluish-green color.  Very pretty sight at 166x and 214x, estimate V = 11.5-12.0.

 

Williamina Fleming discovered IC 1297 in 1894 on a photograph of stellar spectra taken at Harvard College Observatory's Arequipa station in Peru.  Pickering announced the discovery in AN 3227.  Robert Innes independently found it on 30 Oct 1909 and reported it as "a planetary nebula looking like a double star out of focus, 9.3 mag."  Diameter 8"x6", longer axis is in 270°-90°."

 

A star (HD 180206) is also plotted at this position on the Uranometria 2000 Atlas because the CoD and CPD catalogue included the central star (RU CrA) as an entry.

******************************

 

IC 1298

19 18 36 -01 35 46; Aql

Size 0.5'

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; this small group of stars that is located just 3' E of planetary nebula NGC 6778, contains two brighter mag 13/14 stars and at least 3 fainter mag 15+ stars with ~30".

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1298 = Big. 225 on 30 Jul 1889 and called it a "vS Cl, [NGC] 6778 p 3 arcmin."  His position and description corresponds with this small group of stars.

******************************

 

IC 1299

19 22 41 +20 44 30; Vul

Size 4'x2.5'

 

24" (9/16/17): at 200x; at Espin's position is a glowing Milky Way patch with 10-12 stars superimposed.  Most of these are 13th mag stars arranged in a loop or semi-ellipse, open on the north end [2.4' across].  The group appears visually to be a random, unimpressive asterism.

 

Reverend Thomas Espin discovered IC 1299 on 8 Oct 1893, while searching for double stars.  He noted it was "proably a cluster of very faint stars.

******************************

 

IC 1300 = NGC 6798 = UGC 11434 = MCG +09-32-002 = CGCG 281-001 = PGC 63171

19 24 03.2 +53 37 29; Cyg

V = 13.2;  Size 1.6'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 150°

 

See observing notes for NGC 6798.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1300 = Sw. X-47 on 2 Oct 1891 and recorded "eF; vS; R."  There is nothing near his position.  Howe searched unsuccessfully for IC 1300 on two nights at Swift's position.  He communicated afterwards with Swift, who responded that the IC position was one degree too far south.  This implies IC 1300 = NGC 6798.  In the IC 2 Notes, Dreyer comments for IC 1300, "Delenda, = 6798."

******************************

 

IC 1301 = IC 4867 = UGC 11437 = MCG +08-35-010 = CGCG 256-017 NED1 = PGC 63207

19 26 32.0 +50 07 31; Cyg

Size 1.3'x0.6';  PA = 19°

 

24" (6/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, elongated 5:2 or 3:1 SSW-NNE, ~40"x15".  A 1.2' pair (STT 182) of mag 7.4 and mag 8.6 stars is 2' to 3' NE.  The brighter star has a mag 11.5 companion at 35".

 

IC 4867 = IC 1301 forms a close pair with MCG +08-35-011 1' NE.  The companion appeared extremely faint, very small, round, 10"-12" diameter, only pops occasionally.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1301 = Sw. IX-93 on 15 Apr 1890 and recorded "eeF; vS; R; 2 B and 1 F * in line nr f, nearest * nf close D with 300."  There is nothing near his position, though it is about 30' due south of UGC 11437.  Herbert Howe commented that he "searched for these [IC 1300 and 1301] in vain" on two nights.  Howe contacted Swift, who responded with a corrected declination of IC 1301 placing it 35' further north.  This places IC 1301 7' N of UGC 11438 = CGCG 256-018, which CGCG, RC3 and Malcolm Thomson identify as IC 1301.  But this galaxy does not match Swift's description of the surrounding stars.  Harold Corwin notes that 15' N of the corrected position is IC 4867, found visually by Burnham on 21 Jun 1901 while measuring O∑ 182, and this galaxy matches Swift's description, so is a much more likely candidate.

******************************

 

IC 1302 = MCG +06-43-002 = LGG 428-002 = PGC 63307

19 30 52.9 +35 47 07; Cyg

V = 13.4;  Size 0.9'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.2

 

17.5" (7/26/95): very faint, very small, irregularly round.  Bracketed by a mag 11 star off the south edge 35" from center and a mag 14.5 star a similar distance north.  Forms an interesting pair with IC 1303 9.4' NE in a rich star field.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1302 = Sf 36 on 9 Jun 1866 with the 18.5-inch refractor at the Dearborn Observatory.  He simply note "vF, undefined" and his position is 2' too far south-southwest.

******************************

 

IC 1303 = UGC 11452 = MCG +06-43-004 = LGG 428-003 = PGC 63328

19 31 30.2 +35 52 35; Cyg

Size 1.3'x0.8';  PA = 115°

 

17.5" (7/26/95): very faint, small, slightly elongated 4:3 E-W, 40"x30", no concentration.  Collinear with two mag 14 stars to the SW with one star at the edge of the halo.  Forms an unusual pair with IC 1302 9.4' SW in a rich Milky Way field.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1303 = Sf 37 on 9 Jun 1866 with the 18.5-inch refractor at the Dearborn Observatory. He recorded "vF, 30" diam, with small cluster." His position is 2' too far southwest.

******************************

 

IC 1308 = [Hubble25] X = [Hodge77] HII 14 = [Hodge77] A13 = KD D26

19 45 05.3 -14 43 16; Sgr

Size 45"

 

48" (5/16/12): bright, fairly small, irregularly round.  At ~30", this HII knot is slightly larger than Hubble V and more uniform in surface brightness but the brighter portions of Hubble V have a higher surface brightness.  This is the easternmost of four HII knots along the northern side of Barnard's Galaxy.

 

18" (7/12/10): easily visible unfiltered at 225x and stands out fairly well at 285x as a 25" knot (irregularly round). Situated 1.7' NW of a mag 12/14 double star at ~8" separation.  This is the slightly fainter of a similar pair of HII knots at the north end of NGC 6822 with Hubble V just 3' W.

 

17.5" (9/1/02): the eastern of two HII regions at the north end of Barnard's galaxy. Easily visible with averted vision at 220x without a filter and there is mild contrast gain using an OIII filter at 140x.

 

17.5" (7/14/99): following of a pair of HII regions with Hubble V at the north end of NGC 6822 = Barnard's Galaxy. Visible with direct vision at 220x and 280x without a filter. There was a mild contrast gain using a UHC filter at these magnifications.

 

17.5" (8/21/98): easily visible at 220x without a filter as a 30" round knot along with Hubble V just 3.1' W. Because I had no problem viewing this HII region without filtration I didn't blink or use an OIII filter.

 

17.5" (5/10/91): HII region on the NE edge of NGC 6822. At 82x and OIII filter appears as a faint, very small but clearly nebulous round knot. Estimate mag 14. A mag 12 star lies 2' SE (very close double on the POSS). Not seen without a filter. Forms a pair with similar Hubble V just 3' W.

 

Francis Leavenworth discovered IC 1308 = LM(S) 791 on 18 Jun 1887 with the 26-inch refractor at the Leander McCormick observatory.  Leavenworth missed seeing the galaxy but picked up the two bright HII regions at the north end of the galaxy instead.  Apparently, NGC 6822 was assumed to be the HII region Hubble V close preceding IC 1308 (Leavenworth credited both objects to Barnard) as the IC description for 1308 reads "eF, eS, lE, gbM, 6822 p 12s" (which actually refers to Hubble V).  E.E. Barnard independently discovered the two HII regions on 7 Jul 1888 with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.

 

Although the IC position matches this HII region and Howe also reobserved it and noted the double star close SE, Paul Hodge didn't label it as IC 1308 in "The HII regions of NGC 6822", P.A.S.P. 100:917-934, Aug 1988 or in "A Catalogue of diffuse nebula and emission-line stars in NGC 6822", 94:444-452, June 1982.  But Hubble's seminal 1925 paper on NGC 6822 (http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr/full/1925ApJ....62..409H), mentions nebula X is identical to IC 1308.

******************************

 

IC 1309 = PGC 64030

20 03 01.5 -17 13 55; Sgr

V = 14.2;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  PA = 35°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, fairly small, round, 24" diameter, low nearly even surface brightness.  Located in eastern Sagittarius, 7' N of mag 7.6 HD 189926.  The listed PGC magnitude of 13.6 is too bright (HyperLeda gives B = 15.06 Ī 0.5).

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1309 = J. 1-385 on 26 Aug 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1310 = Berkeley 50 = LBN 181 = Ced 178

20 10 01 +34 58 06; Cyg

Size 4'

 

17.5" (8/2/97): picked up at 100x as a small nebulous patch in a rich Milky Way field surrounding a mag 13 star.  It didn't stand out well at this power due to the rich environment but the glow had a noticeably higher surface brightness than the unresolved Milky Way glow.  The view was improved at 220x; a faint sprinkling of stars are superimposed (8-10 with averted vision) and the 2' cluster has an irregular outline.  Appears similar to a partially resolved globular.  A nice mag 12/13 double star [9" separation] is off the NE end 1.5' from center.  The view holds up well at 410x and one or two additional faint stars were resolved.

 

Rev. Thomas Espin discovered IC 1310 on 19 Sep 1893 with his 17-inch reflector at his private observatory in England while sweeping for red stars.  He simply recorded "faint nebulosity"  Very close to his position is this faint cluster, which was independently catalogued as Berkeley 50.

 

Probably due to the IC description, Cederblad included IC 1310 in his list of bright nebulae as well as Beverly Lynds, although there is no nebulosity.

******************************

 

IC 1311 = OCL 173 = OCL 174 = Lund 925 = 928 = Cr 414 = Tr 36

20 10 47 +41 10 30; Cyg

V = 13.1;  Size 6'

 

17.5" (8/17/93): very faint cluster; consists of ~15 stars mag 13.5 to 15 in a 4'x3' oval outline over unresolved haze.  A mag 10 star is off the west side and most resolved stars are around the periphery.  Located within a semi-circle of bright stars including mag 6.9 SAO 49274 5' N and mag 8.1 SAO 49289 6' E.

 

8" (8/15/82): very small group of four mag 13 stars.  Use high power to resolve.

 

Rev. Thomas Espin discovered IC 1311 on 6 Oct 1893 with his 17-inch reflector at his private observatory in England while sweeping for red stars.  He recorded an "extremely faint nebula within a circle of bright stars."  His position (though mentioned as approximate in his discovery list) is fairly accurate.  The Lynga 5 position, though, is incorrect (repeated in Sky Catalogue 2000 and Skiff & Luginbuhl).

******************************

 

IC 1313 = MCG -03-51-008 = PGC 64463 = LEDA 891211

20 18 43.7 -16 56 46; Cap

V = 14.1;  Size 1.8'x1.4';  PA = 26°

 

24" (6/22/17): at 200x and 375x; fairly faint, moderately large, roundish, ~1' diameter, very small brighter nucleus (no core).  A 13th magnitude star is superimposed on the west side [18" from center].

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1313 = J. 1-386 on 25 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1317 = UGC 11546 = MCG +00-52-004 = CGCG 373-005 = II Zw 82 = PGC 64586

20 23 15.6 +00 39 52; Aql

V = 13.8;  Size 0.7'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 80°

 

17.5" (7/8/94): fairly faint, small, round, 0.5' diameter, weak even concentration to a brighter core and faint stellar nucleus.  A mag 12.5 star is 1.6' NNE and a mag 15 star is 40" NW.  Described as a planetary in the IC.

 

17.5": fairly faint, extremely small, round, bright core, compact.

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1317 = Sp 23 on 30 Sep 1891 with the 27-inch refractor in Vienna.  His position is accurate, though he called it a "planetary nebula = mag 12 star, size 1/4' or slightly less, easily visible."  Based on a Crossley plate taken Lick Observatory (1912), Charles Perrine also described a "faint planetary about 15" in diameter" (perhaps using Spitaler's comment).

******************************

 

IC 1318 = LBN 223 = LBN 234 = LBN 245 = LBN 251 = Ced 176 = Sh 2-108 = Gamma Cyg Nebula = Butterfly Nebula

20 22 14 +40 15 24; Cyg

 

18" (7/13/07): Both portions of the "Butterfly Nebula" were easily visible at 12.5x in my 80mm finder using an H-beta filter and were an amazing sight in my 18-inch at 73x using both H-beta and UHC filters as they stretched across the entire 67' field of field and separated by a wide dark lane (LDN 889).

 

IC 1318d (centered ~1° east of Gamma Cyg) passes through two 7th magnitude stars (HD 194789 and HD 194908) and is very prominent near these stars.  This swath of nebulosity courses mainly SW and NE from these stars.  To the west of the bright stars, the nebula is bifurcated into two forks by a dark lane.  To the north and NE of the stars, the nebulosity spreads out wider and is interspersed with darker regions.  Overall the surface brightness of this section is fairly high but varies quite a bit in intensity and is slightly brighter on the following side of the NE end where it contrasts with the wide dust lane that separates IC 1318e to the SE.

 

IC 1318e is situated roughly 35' SE of IC 1318d on the opposite side of dark nebula LDN 889.  This bright section passes through several wide double stars and gently curves as it sweeps from SW to NE.  The overall length is at least 35'x10' (not as wide as on photographs but nearly as long).  One or two darker spots or regions lie within the nebulosity although it appears as a single continuous piece without as much structure as IC 1318d.

 

IC 1318b is possibly the brightest piece of the IC 1318 complex and is located ~2° NW of Gamma Cyg (Sadr).  At 73x and either H-beta or UHC filter, it appeared very extended SW-NE or WSW-ENE, roughly 40'x8' and passes through a mag 8 star.  This section was easily visible at 12.5x in the 80mm finder using a H-beta filter.  The brightest portion is to the NE of the mag 8 star and a number of similar mag stars are involved with this portion.  Removing the filter, this section was still visible though the highest contrast was using a UHC filter.  To the SW of the star, this river of nebulosity takes a mild bend and flows more towards the south.  Another fainter section of nebulosity (not included in the size estimate) spreads out to the NNW of the mag 8 star.

 

12.5x80mm (7/13/07): viewed in 80mm finder using an H-beta filter.  The two roughly parallel brightest sections to the east of Gamma that form the "Butterfly Nebula" (IC 1318d and 1318e) were obvious as extremely large parallel strips oriented ~SW-NE and separated by a wide dark lane.

 

16x80 (8/23/84): extremely large complex of irregular emission nebulae surrounded Gamma Cygni (position given) with six sections visible at 16x using a UHC and H-beta filters.  Overfills the 4° finder field!  The most prominent section is an isolated patch NW of Gamma at the edge of the field (IC 1318b = Ced 176c = LBN 251 = DWB 82) and next are two parallel strips just east (IC 1318d = LBN 249) and SE of Gamma (IC 1318e = LBN 245) that have fairly sharp edges.  Observation from Mt Rose (above Lake Tahoe) using the finder.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1318 on a photographic plate taken with the Willard lens in 1892.  He simply mentioned "A photograph which I have made in 1892 with five hours of exposure was Chi Cygni, shows Gamma Cygni to be surrounded by numerous large patches and strips of nebulosity." (Astronomy and Astro-Physics, Vol XIII, No. 3, March 1894).

******************************

 

IC 1319 = ESO 596-37 = MCG -03-52-007 = PGC 64675

20 26 01.2 -18 30 15; Cap

V = 13.8;  Size 0.8'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 9°

 

17.5" (8/8/02): fairly faint, small, slightly elongated, 0.6'x0.5', very weak concentration.  Located 2.1' SE of mag 8.5 HD 194394, which makes the observation more difficult.  Forms a close pair with MCG +02-52-006 2.9' SW which was not noticed.

 

13.1" (8/17/85): faint, small, round, very weak concentration.  Located 2.1' SE of mag 8.5 SAO 163559 which interferes with viewing.  Forms a pair with NGC 6912 13' SE.  Also viewed the week before on 8/11/85 with similar notes.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1319 = J. 1-387 on 20 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1320 = UGC 11560 = MCG +00-52-009 = CGCG 373-008 = PGC 64685

20 26 25.7 +02 54 35; Del

V = 13.6;  Size 1.0'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 87°

 

17.5" (8/21/98): faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 ~E-W, weak concentration.  Brightest in a group with UGC 11561 at 17.5' S and UGC 11562 at 13.6' south.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1320 = J. 2-791 on 19 Aug 1893.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1321 = ESO 596-043 = MCG -03-52-011 = PGC 64751

20 28 11.1 -18 17 29; Cap

V = 14.4;  Size 1.1'x0.8';  Surf Br = 14.0;  PA = 85°

 

24" (6/22/17): faint to fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated E-W, 25" diameter, nearly even low surface brightness.  Located 13' SE of mag 5.2 Pi Cap!

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1321 = J. 1-388 on 17 Aug 1892.  His position is accurate.  This galaxy is not plotted on the Uranometria 2000 Atlas (2nd version).

******************************

 

IC 1324 = MCG -02-52-012 = PGC 64906

20 32 12.3 -09 03 22; Cap

V = 13.5;  Size 1.4'x1.4'

 

24" (6/23/17): at 375x; moderately bright, small, round, 20" diameter (core only).  Contains a very small, very bright nucleus.  A thin halo increases the size with averted to 30"-35" diameter.  A mag 14.7 star is 50" S of center and a mag 12.4 star is 1.3' SSE.  IC 1324 is situated 3.4' N of mag 9.8 HD 195514.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1324 = Sw. VII-100 on 16 Sep 1887 and recorded "eeF; S; R; 8th mag. * s[outh]".  There's nothing at his original position, but Herbert Howe corrected the RA 26 seconds further east.  This position matches MCG -02-52-012 = PGC 64906 and the bright star is 3.3' nearly due south.

******************************

 

IC 1325 = NGC 6928 = UGC 11589 = MCG +02-52-017 = CGCG 424-021 = LGG 438-003 = WBL 663-002 = PGC 64932

20 32 50.4 +09 55 37; Del

V = 12.2;  Size 2.0'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.3;  PA = 106°

 

See observing notes for NGC 6928.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1325 = Sw. VIII-98, along with IC 1326, on 23 Sep 1888 and reported "vF; S; 3 or 4 F st inv; sp of 2 [with IC 1326 = NGC 6930]."  His position is 3' south of NGC 6928 and he confused the orientation of the two galaxies, which is northwest-southeast, but IC 1325 = NGC 6928 and IC 1326 = NGC 6930.

******************************

 

IC 1326 = NGC 6930 = UGC 11590 = MCG +02-52-018 = CGCG 424-022 = LGG 438-004 = WBL 663-003 = PGC 64935

20 32 58.8 +09 52 28; Del

V = 12.8;  Size 1.3'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.1;  PA = 8°

 

See observing notes for NGC 6930.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1326 = Sw. VIII-99, along with IC 1325, on 23 Sep 1888 and recorded "eeeF; S; eE; spindle; pF * nr south; wide D * nr sf; ee diff; nf of 2 [with IC 1325]."  His position is 1' NNE of NGC 6930 and he confused the orientation, which is northwest to southeast.  Herbert Howe suggested the NGC/IC equivalences (IC 1325 = NGC 6928 and IC 1326 = NGC 6930) and measured an accurate position.

******************************

 

IC 1327 = CGCG 373-038 = PGC 65027

20 35 41.3 -00 00 21; Aql

V = 13.7;  Size 0.8'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 170°

 

24" (7/16/15): faint to fairly faint, fairly small, round, 18" diameter, weak concentration.  Located 1.5' WSW of mag 7.1 HD 196203, which detracts from viewing!

 

Sherburne Burnham discovered IC 1327 on 20 Aug 1889 with the Lick 36-inch in the field of mag 7.1 HD 196203.  He measured a P.A. of 257° and a separation of 84.5".  The discovery was announced in Publications of Lick Observatory, Vol II and AN 2957.

******************************

 

IC 1328 = ESO 597-028 = MCG -03-52-023 = PGC 65217

20 41 57.0 -19 37 59; Cap

Size 0.9'x0.35';  PA = 50°

 

24" (7/14/18): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 or 5:3 SW-NE, ~25"x15", low nearly even surface brightness.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1328 = J. 1-391 on 25 Aug 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1329

20 43 43 +15 36.1; Del

Size 1'

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; very faint, small irregular patch with 2 or 3 very faint stars superimposed (brightest ~15.5).  Bumping the magnification to 500x, 3 resolved stars were definite and a 4th glimpsed.  The DSS shows about 10 stars in a small group.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1329 = Sw. IX-95 on 23 Sep 1889 and recorded "eeeF; pL; R; in center of trap of 4 st; eee dif; in finder field with Gamma and Delta Dephini."  Very close to his position is an asterism of several mag 15-16 stars that fits his description "in center of trap[ezoid] of 4 stars".  Corwin confirms this group of stars is IC 1329.

******************************

 

IC 1330 = MCG -02-53-002 = PGC 65345

20 46 14.9 -14 01 24; Aqr

Size 1.2'x0.4';  PA = 110°

 

24" (7/14/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:1 NW-SE, small brighter core.  A mag 14.6 star lies 0.7' N of center.  Situated 6' NNE of mag 9.6 HD 197742.  IC 1330 sits within an oval ring of stars roughly 10' across.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1330 = J. 1-392 on 16 Jul 1891.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1331 = MCG -02-53-005 = PGC 65396

20 47 48.9 -09 59 45; Aqr

V = 13.7;  Size 1.8'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 85°

 

17.5" (8/8/02): faint, small, very elongated 3:1 ~E-W, 0.6'x0.2', very small brighter core. A faint star is at the west tip and off the north side of the east end.  Forms the north vertex of a triangle with mag 8.5 HD 197980 4.6' SW and mag 9 HD 198062 6.0' SE.  Forms a pair with MCG -02-53-004 3' NNW, which was not seen.  Located 30' S of mag 3.8 Epsilon Aquarii.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1331 = J. 1-393 on 13 Sep 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1332 = MCG -02-53-011 = PGC 65584

20 51 51.4 -13 42 41; Aqr

Size 0.9'x0.6';  PA = 64°

 

24" (7/14/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated SW-NE, ~24"x20", nearly even surface brightness.  Located 5' NE of mag 8.4 HD 198557 and 15' NNE of mag 7.6 HD 198528.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1332 = J. 1-394 on 16 Jul 1891.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1333 = IC 1334 = MCG -03-53-008 = PGC 65614

20 52 17.2 -16 17 09; Cap

Size 1.4'x0.7';  PA = 83°

 

24" (7/14/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 ~E-W, 30"x20", gradually increases to the center but no distinct core or nucleus.  Located 10' SW of mag 8.5 HD 198730.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1333 = J. 1-395 on 4 Aug 1891.  His position is 2.4' due north of IC 1334 = PGC 65614, which was found the following July.  There is only one galaxy here, so likely he made an error in the declination (different offset stars were used).

******************************

 

IC 1334 = IC 1333 = MCG -03-53-008 = PGC 65614

20 52 17.2 -16 17 09; Cap

Size 1.4'x0.7';  PA = 83°

 

24" (7/14/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 ~E-W, 30"x20", gradually increases to the center but no distinct core or nucleus.  Located 10' SW of mag 8.5 HD 198730.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1334 = J. 1-396 on 22 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.  Javelle likely discovered this galaxy the previous August, but his position for IC 1333 was 2' too far north, so he apparently thought it was a different galaxy.  Most likely, IC 1333 = IC 1334.  PGC labels the galaxy as IC 1334, though IC 1333 refers to the earlier observation.

******************************

 

IC 1336 = ESO 598-001 = MCG -03-53-009 = PGC 65706

20 55 04.9 -18 02 19; Cap

Size 0.8'x0.5';  PA = 44°

 

24" (9/5/18): at 225x and 375x; fairly faint, small, round, 25" diameter, low even surface brightness.  An E-W string of stars passes just to the north of the galaxy.  Located 8' SE of mag 5.8 19 Capricorni (HD 199012).

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1336 = J. 1-398 on 17 Aug 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1337 = MCG -03-53-012 = PGC 65760

20 56 52.7 -16 35 09; Cap

Size 1.2'x1.1'

 

24" (9/5/18): at 225x and 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25"-30" diameter.  Several mag 13-14 stars are nearby to the west and south and mag 9.7 HD 199296 is 7' S.  IC 1338 lies 5.7' NNE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1337 = J. 1-399 on 22 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1338 = LEDA 140938

20 56 57.8 -16 29 33; Cap

Size 0.7'x0.5';  PA = 6°

 

24" (9/5/18): at 225x and 375x; very faint, very small, round, 15"-20" diameter, low even surface brightness.  It required a careful look to initially notice this galaxy at 225x.  Located 5.7' NNE of brighter IC 1337.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1338 = J. 1-400 on 26 Aug 1892.  His position is accurate.  HyperLEDA doesn't label this galaxy as IC 1338 and it was classified as "UNVERIFIED" in Sinnott's NGC 2000.0.

******************************

 

IC 1339 = ESO 598-008 = MCG -03-53-013 = PGC 65799

20 57 55.5 -17 56 34; Cap

V = 13.3;  Size 1.4'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 52°

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, diffuse oval glow 3:2 SW-NE, 45"x30", broad weak concentration with a small slightly brighter nucleus with direct vision.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1339 = J. 1-401 on 17 Aug 1891.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1340 = Veil Nebula

20 56 12 +31 04; Cyg

Size 25'x20'

 

17.5": this is part of the intricate southern portion of the eastern arc (NGC 6992) of the Veil nebula.  This region contains the remarkable filamentary side branches that extend west at the south end of NGC 6992 and NGC 6995.  See description for NGC 6992.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1340 = Sf. 51 on 13 Sep 1866 with the 18.5-inch refractor at the Dearborn Observatory. He noted "possibly connected with h2093 [NGC 6995]."  His position is ~1.5' northeast of this knot in NGC 6995.

******************************

 

IC 1341 = MCG -02-53-016 = PGC 65876

21 00 16.7 -13 58 35; Aqr

Size 0.9'x0.5';  PA = 61°

 

24" (7/11/18): at 375x; faint, fairly small, slightly elongated WSW-ENE, 30"x20", low uniform surface brightness.  A mag 14.8 star is close off the south edge, 40" from center.  A mag 9.7 star (HD 199883) lies 2.8' N.  IC 1346 lies 20' E (similar redshift).

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1341 = J. 1-402, along with IC 1346 and IC 1350 on 7 Aug 1891.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1342 = MCG -03-53-017 = PGC 65878

21 00 25.4 -14 29 45; Aqr

V = 13.9;  Size 0.9'x0.4';  PA = 74°

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, slightly brighter nucleus, 24" diameter.  Situated just 2.8' SE of a bright mag 8.8 star.  LEDA 187816, 5' NW, appeared faint, round, 15" diameter, weak concentration with a slightly brighter nucleus.

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 30" diameter, very small bright nucleus.  Located 2.8' SE of mag 8.8 HD 199853.  LEDA 187816, picked up 5' NW, appeared faint, small, round, 18" diameter, quasi-stellar nucleus.  Can hold steadily at this magnification.  The two galaxies have a similar redshift (z = .027), so likely are physically related.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1342 = J. 1-403 on 20 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1344 = MCG -02-53-018 = PGC 65913

21 01 16.5 -13 22 49; Aqr

V = 13.7;  Size 1.0'x0.4';  PA = 50°

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; faint or fairly faint, elongated 2:1 SW-NE, low surface brightness, no core or noticeable zones.  A faint star is close to the southwest end.  A mag 13.9 star is 1.2' NE and collinear with the major axis.  First in a group of 9 IC galaxies within 16'!  Forms a pair with IC 1345 1.7' SE.  Located 9' N of 6.5-magnitude 9 Aquarii.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1344 = J. 1-405 on 5 Aug 1891 in a group of galaxies.

******************************

 

IC 1345 = LEDA 938504

21 01 22.2 -13 23 51; Aqr

Size 0.35'x0.35'

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; extremely to very faint, extremely small, round, 12" diameter.  Located 1.7' SE of IC 1344 in a group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1345 = J. 1-406 on 5 Aug 1891 in a group of galaxies.  His position is accurate.  This galaxy is not in any of the major galaxy catalogues and HyperLeda doesn't label its LEDA 938504 as IC 1345.

******************************

 

IC 1346 = MCG -02-53-019 = PGC 65927

21 01 37.0 -13 57 38; Aqr

Size 0.8'x0.6'

 

24" (7/11/18): at 375x; faint or fairly faint, fairly small, low uniform surface brightness, 30" diameter.  Slightly brighter IC 1350 lies 7.5' NE and slightly fainter IC 1341 is 20' W.

 

LEDA 93132, situated 2.0' N, appeared faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  A mag 13.2 star is 40" SE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1346 = J. 1-407, along with IC 1354, on 7 Aug 1891.  There is nothing at either of his positions but their relative positions point to IC 1346 = MCG -02-53-019 and IC 1354 = MCG -02-53-021.  Harold Corwin worked backwards and found that Javelle misidentified his offset star, which caused the poor positions.  He found the second galaxy again on 26 July 1892 and measured an accurate position.  As a result IC 1354 is better known as IC 1350.

******************************

 

IC 1347 = MCG -02-53-020 = PGC 65928

21 01 44.4 -13 18 47; Aqr

Size 0.8'x0.6';  PA = 1°

 

24" (9/23/17): at 375x; faint or fairly faint, fairly small, round, small brighter nucleus, 25" diameter.  Situated 1.3' SE of a mag 10.4 star.  Located in a group of 9 IC galaxies, including 7 in a chain.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1347 = J. 1-408 on 5 Aug 1891 in a group.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1348 = LEDA 3093671

21 01 44.1 -13 21 29; Aqr

Size 0.3'x0.2';  PA = 155°

 

24" (9/23/17): at 375x; faint, small, round, 20" diameter, small bright nucleus (similar to IC 1347).  In a group of 9 IC galaxies with brighter IC 1347 2.7' N.

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; very faint, extremely small, round, 10" diameter.  Located in the IC 1344 group of 9 IC galaxies.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1348 = J. 1-409 on 5 Aug 1891 in a group of faint galaxies.  His position is accurate. This galaxy is not in any of the major galaxy catalogues and HyperLeda doesn't label its LEDA 3093671 as IC 1345.

******************************

 

IC 1349 = LEDA 940379

21 01 50.5 -13 15 56; Aqr

Size 0.7'x0.4';  PA = 51°

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; very faint, very small, round, 15" diameter, low surface brightness.  Located in a small group of 9 IC galaxies with IC 1353 1.5' ESE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1349 = J. 1-410 on 6 Aug 1891 in a group of faint galaxies.  His position is 30" too far northwest (same offset as IC 1351). This galaxy is not in any of the major galaxy catalogues and HyperLeda doesn't label its LEDA 940379 as IC 1345.

******************************

 

IC 1350 = IC 1354 = MCG -02-53-021 = PGC 65939

21 01 52.3 -13 51 10; Aqr

Size 0.8'x0.5';  PA = 160°

 

24" (7/11/18): at 375x; fairly faint, small, round, 24" diameter, faint stellar nucleus.  IC 1346 lies 7.5' SSW.

 

MCG -02-53-022 = FGC 2301, situated 11' NE, appeared faint, very elongated 4:1 NNW-SSE, 40"x10", low even surface brightness.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1350 = J. 1-411 on 26 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.  Javelle discovered this galaxy (along with IC 1346) on 7 Aug 1891, but he misidentified the offset star used for J. 1-415 (later IC 1354), so his position for IC 1346 is not accurate.  In any case, IC 1350 = IC 1354.

******************************

 

IC 1351 = LEDA 941325

21 01 52.4 -13 12 07; Aqr

Size 0.7'x0.2';  PA = 25°

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; extremely fant, very small, slightly elongated SSW-NNE, 0.3'x0.2'.  Apparently I only picked up the core of this edge-on galaxy.  IC 1355 is situated is 2.3' NE.  Located in a group of 9 IC galaxies

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1351 = J. 1-412 on 5 Aug 1891 in a group of faint galaxies.  His position is 30" too far northwest (same offset as IC 1349 and 1355). This galaxy is not in any of the major galaxy catalogues and HyperLeda doesn't label its LEDA 941325 as IC 1345.

******************************

 

IC 1352 = LEDA 938673

21 01 54.9 -13 23 03; Aqr

Size 0.5'x0.3';  PA = 30°

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; very faint, very small slightly elongated, 15"x10" or 15"x12".  A mag 14 star is close north [33"].  The DSS and PanSTARRS image shows a mag 15.5 at the south edge.  This star was unresolved from the galaxy.  Located on the SE side of a group of 9 faint IC galaxies.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1352 = J. 1-413 on 5 Aug 1891 in a group.  His position is accurate. This galaxy is not in any of the major galaxy catalogues and HyperLeda doesn't label LEDA 940379 as IC 1345.

******************************

 

IC 1353 = LEDA 940278

21 01 56.3 -13 16 22; Aqr

Size 0.4'x0.3';  PA = 134°

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; extremely faint and small, round, only glimpsed occasionally.  Located 1.5' ESE of IC 1349 in a group of 9 IC galaxies.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1353 = J. 1-J. 414 on 6 Aug 1891 in a group of faint galaxies.  His position is just off the west side of LEDA 940278. This galaxy is not in any of the major galaxy catalogues and HyperLeda doesn't label LEDA 940278 as IC 1345.

******************************

 

IC 1354 = IC 1350 = MCG -02-53-021 = PGC 65939

21 01 52.3 -13 51 10; Aqr

Size 0.8'x0.5';  PA = 160°

 

24" (7/11/18): at 375x; fairly faint, small, round, 24" diameter, faint stellar nucleus.  IC 1346 lies 7.5' SSW.

 

MCG -02-53-022 = FGC 2301, situated 11' NE, appeared faint, very elongated 4:1 NNW-SSE, 40"x10", low even surface brightness.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1354 = J. 1-415, along with IC 1346, on 7 Aug 1891.  There is nothing at either position, but Harold Corwin found that based on their relative positions, he misidentified his offset star.  Once corrected his offsets for IC 1354 match MCG -02-53-021 = PGC 65939.  He found this galaxy again on 26 Jul 1892, assumed it was new, and it was assigned IC 1350.  So, IC 1354 = IC 1350.

******************************

 

IC 1355 = LEDA 2800921

21 01 58.4 -13 10 23; Aqr

Size 0.4'x0.4'

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; very faint or faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  Located at the northeast side of a group of 9 IC galaxies in a 16' diameter (many in a N-S string).

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1355 = J. 1-416 on 6 Aug 1891 in a group of faint galaxies.  His position is 27" too far northwest (same offset as IC 1349 and 1351). This galaxy is not in any of the major galaxy catalogues and HyperLeda doesn't label its LEDA 2800921 as IC 1355.

******************************

 

IC 1359 = UGC 11684 = MCG +02-54-001 = II Zw 103 = CGCG 426-004 = PGC 66189

21 08 43.0 +12 29 03; Del

V = 13.8;  Size 1.0'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.3;  PA = 171°

 

24" (7/21/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, very elongated 3:1 ~N-S, 50"x16".  Unusual appearance with a small, prominent, sharply defined core.  The edge-on arms appeared as thin, much fainter extensions or wings.  Located 16' SSE of mag 7.7 HD 201297.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1359 = Sw. IX-96 on 11 Sep 1889 and recorded "eeF; eS; stellar; eF * attached."  His position is 40" SW of center of UGC 11684.  Based on my visual observation, I think it's likely he assumed the nearly stellar nucleus was a star.

******************************

 

IC 1360 = CGCG 401-003 = PGC 66266

21 10 50.3 +05 04 17; Equ

V = 14.6;  Size 0.7'x0.3';  PA = 20°

 

17.5" (7/22/01): extremely faint and small, round, 10" diameter, low surface brightness.  A bit easier to view than IC 1361 at the edge of the 220x field 10' E.

 

17.5" (11/25/00): extremely faint, very small, round, 15" diameter (probably viewed core only), low even surface brightness.  A faint star is close NW [34" from center].  A group of 5 mag 12-13 stars (four in a curving string) lie just to the north.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1360 = J. 2-792, along with IC 1361, on 19 Aug 1893.

******************************

 

IC 1361 = UGC 11692 = MCG +01-54-002 = CGCG 401-005 = PGC 66297

21 11 29.1 +05 03 16; Equ

V = 14.1;  Size 0.9'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 45°

 

17.5" (7/22/01): extremely faint, small, round, 20" diameter, low even surface brightness.  Forms a near equilateral triangle with a 30" pair of mag 13 stars 3' WSW and a mag 11.5 star 3' SSE.  Located 10' E of IC 1360.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1361 = J. 2-793, along with IC 1360, on 19 Aug 1893.

******************************

 

IC 1362 = CGCG 375-007 = PGC 66316

21 11 52.6 +02 19 45; Aqr

V = 14.7;  Size 0.6'x0.45';  PA = 167°

 

24" (10/6/18): at 375x; faint, very small, round, 15"-20" diameter, occasionally slightly elongated, low surface brightness, very small brighter nucleus.  Visible continuously at 375x.  Located 9' ESE of mag 8.6 HD 201893.  Member of the IC 1365 group with a light travel time of ~665 million years.

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1362 = Spitaler 24 on 29 Sep 1891.  He described it as "Air good, but a bit hazy. Very faint, round nebula of at most 1/4' diameter; 1/2' NE of the nebula is a mag 14 star. Excentric to the middle, I notice at times a faint star."  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1363

21 10 40.4 +46 52 11; Cyg

Size 2'x1.5'

 

24" (9/5/18): at 124x; IC 1363 is an unremarkable group of stars just north of a BD 46°3214, set within an excellent Milky Way field.  The BD star is an uncatalogued double consisting of a mag 10/11 pair at ~6" separation and another mag 11 star is 1' NE.  Just north of this latter star are several mag 13.5-14.5 stars within a 2' region that apparently caught Espin's eye while sweeping.  But the general 50' field is nearly as rich in small clumps and strings of stars.

 

Rev. Thomas Espin discovered IC 1363 while sweeping for red stars on 9 Sep 1893 with his 17.3-inch reflector.  He noted "Faint, extending N. from DM +46 3214, 9.4 mag."  The magnitude applies to the star, not the "nebula."  On the north side of this brighter star are several very faint stars.  Corwin estimates the size of the asterism as ~2' x 1.5'.

******************************

 

IC 1364 = MCG +00-54-006 = CGCG 375-013 = II Zw 107 = PGC 66367

21 13 24.6 +02 46 11; Equ

V = 13.8;  Size 1.0'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 130°

 

17.5" (8/8/02): faint, small, slightly elongated, 0.5'x0.4'.  Weak even concentration to a faint stellar nucleus.  Located 2.7' NW of mag 9.4 SAO 126626.

 

17.5" (5/10/91): faint, small, round, small slightly brighter core.  Located 2.6' NW of mag 9.2 SAO 126626.  A mag 8 star lies 6.5' WNW and a mag 7 star is 12' SW.  IC 1367 lies 18' NE and IC 1365 is 15' SE.

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1364 = Sp. 25 on 30 Sep 1891 with the 27-inch refractor at Vienna.  Stephane Javelle found it just 3 nights later with the 30-inch refractor at Nice!

******************************

 

IC 1365 = MCG +00-54-007 = CGCG 375-015 = II Zw 108 = VV 508 = PGC 66381

21 13 56.0 +02 33 56; Equ

V = 13.7;  Size 1.1'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 57°

 

48" (10/27/19): this remarkable, merging galaxy contains 4 distinct nuclei in a nearly 60"x30" glow oriented WSW-ENE.  The central two nuclei are separated by only 7" N-S, but were resolved cleanly at 976x.  The fainter southern nuclei was faint, very small, round, ~10" diameter, while the northern core was nearly moderately bright and ~15" diameter.   The outer nuclei were both 20" from the center; the western one (catalogued as LEDA 3938837) was moderately bright, fairly small, round, ~15" diameter and the eastern one very faint, very small, round, 10" diameter.

 

Additional group members are nearby. LEDA 1229977, 2.2' SW, appeared moderately bright, elongated 2:1 WSW-ENE, ~15"x8", brighter core. A mag 12.5 star is 1' E.  LEDA 1230860, 2' W, was fairly faint, very small bright core, thin edge-on with very faint extensions, ~18"x5".  A mag 13 star is 1.3' SW.  LEDA 1232711, 4' NNE, was fairly bright, round, bright core, ~20" diameter.  A mag 16.3 star is 30" E.  This galaxy forms the northern vertex of an isosceles triangle with two mag 13 stars 1' SW and 1' S.  IC 1370, also a multiple system, lies 30' SE.

 

24" (10/6/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 0.5'x0.4', broad concentration, slightly brighter core.  An extremely compact companion (IC 1365 NED02) is at the edge of the halo on the west side.  It appeared very faint, round, ~6" diameter.  The main glow forms an isosceles triangle with a mag 12 star 1.7' E and a mag 12.4 star 1.7' SSW.

 

LEDA 1232711, situated  4' NE, appeared very faint (V = 15.2), round, only 12"-15" diameter.  An extremely faint star (V = 16.4) is less than 30" E.  The galaxy forms the north vertex of an equilateral triangle with two 13th mag stars 1.1' SW and 1.2' S.

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; the main component of this multiple system (IC 1365 NED01) appeared faint, small, slightly elongated ~E-W, 0.4'x0.3', small brighter nucleus.  Just at or off the west end [21" between centers] is a faint, extremely small glow (IC 1365 NED02), ~6" diameter.  A third component at the east end of the halo was difficult to confirm.  The combined glow of the 2 or 3 components extends 40" WSW-ENE.

 

17.5" (8/8/02): faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 0.8'x0.6'.  Smooth, fairly low surface brightness.

 

17.5" (5/10/91): very faint, extremely small, round, almost stellar but there is a faint extension to the west of the core.  IC 1364 lies 15' NW and NGC 7046 is 22' NE.

 

Edward Swift, Lewis' 20 year-old son, discovered IC 1365 = Sw. X-48 = Spitaler 26 on 28 Sep 1891 while searching for Comet Tempel-Swift.  Rudolph Spitaler independently found the galaxy just two days later at Vienna and noted there appeared to be a second feeble nebula preceding by a few seconds.  The SDSS reveals several very faint neighbors within the halo (Spitaler's nebula is IC 1365 NED02).

******************************

 

IC 1367 = CGCG 375-019 = PGC 66390

21 14 09.7 +02 59 37; Equ

V = 14.4;  Size 0.3'x0.2'

 

17.5" (5/10/91): very faint, very small, round, very low even surface brightness.  A mag 12 star is 1.0' WNW.  Located ~15' NW of NGC 7046 and 18' NE of IC 1364.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1367 = J. 1-421 on 30 Sep 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1368 = UGC 11703 = MCG +00-54-008 = CGCG 375-018 = PGC 66389

21 14 12.6 +02 10 41; Aqr

V = 13.4;  Size 1.1'x0.35';  Surf Br = 12.1;  PA = 47°

 

48" (10/27/19): at 542x; between  moderately bright and fairly bright, fairly large, very elongated 7:2 SW-NE, ~1.0'x0.3', brighter core, hint of structure in the outer extensions.  Located 15' WSW of IC 1370.  Observed in windy conditions.

 

24" (9/16/17): at 260x and 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, oval or spindle 5:2 SW-NE, ~40"x18", weak concentration.  IC 1370 lies 15' ENE.

 

Edward Swift discovered IC 1368 = Sw. X-49 on 28 Sep 1891 and reported "eeeF; S; R; eee diff.; Found searching for Comet Tempel-Swift."  Howe reobserved the galaxy around 1900 and commented "on each two nights I noted it as much elongated at 225° [SW-NE]."  Howe's description is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1369 = Cr 432

21 12 07 +47 46 00; Cyg

V = 8.8;  Size 5'

 

18" (7/30/03): this fairly rich open cluster was picked up while observing dark nebula B361 located 20' S.  At 215x, approximately two dozen stars were resolved in a boxy outline, roughly 4' diameter.  There is a lower density of stars in the center of the group and the cluster is set over some unresolved haze.  Appears as a partially resolved glowing spot at 73x (31 Nagler).  Sh 1-89, a faint planetary, lies 20' E.

 

13.1" (9/3/83): 15 faint stars over haze, fairly small, appears rich. 

 

8" (8/12/83): rich glowing spot with many very faint stars at visual threshold over haze with averted.  Also a small group of five stars in the field to the E.  A wide pair ß159 = 6.0/7.5 at 135" is in the field 18' WSW.

 

Carl Frederick Pechüle discovered IC 1369 on 27 Apr 1891 using the 11-inch refractor at the Copenhagen Observatory (1894AN....136..317P).  Rev. Thomas Espin independently discovered the cluster on 9 Sep 1893 with his 17.5-inch reflector in England and recorded "Faint, large, many small stars."

******************************

 

IC 1370 = CGCG 375-021 = II Zw 111 = PGC 66418

21 15 14.3 +02 11 31; Aqr

V = 14.6;  Size 0.6'x0.4';  PA = 54°

 

48" (10/29/19): IC 1370 is a multiple system with the largest and brightest galaxy at the east side.  At 610x it appeared moderately bright, fairly small, round, fairly high surface brightness, 15"-18" diameter, sharp bright stellar nucleus.  A mag 16 star is just 10" E of center and a mag 14.5 star is 0.9' NE.  Located 3.5' W of a mag 10 star.

 

An extremely faint galaxy (V = 17.6) was seen 12" W of center of IC 1370.  In addition, LEDA 1219013 is a double system only 23" W of IC 1370.  Both components (V = 17.0/17.6) were barely resolved at 610x.  LEDA 1219124 is a brighter galaxy (V = 16.8) 0.9' WNW of IC 1370.  Finally, LEDA 1217822 (V = 15.8) is a thin low surface brightness edge-on 2.2' SSE of IC 1370.  IC 1365, a quadruple merging system, lies 30' NW.

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  At first I thought it had a faint stellar nucleus, but this a 16th mag star at the east edge. IC 1368 lies 15' W.

 

24" (8/12/15): at 375x; faint, very small, round, ~10"-12" in diameter.  Forms an extremely close "pair" with a mag 16 star [10" east of center], close to the edge of the small halo!

 

An extremely faint, stellar or nearly stellar object was occasionally glimpsed close to the west [by 24"].  This was probably LEDA 1219013, itself a double system, with a B magnitude close to 17.  IC 1370 is located 3.5' S of a mag 9.5 star and the same distance west of a mag 10.1 star, so it forms the southwest vertex of an isosceles right triangle with the two stars.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1370 = J. 1-422 on 5 Oct 1891 and recorded "vF, 2 F st inv".  At least one of these "stars" (as in my observation) is likely one of the components of this multiple system.  On the SDSS, there are a total of 5 galaxies, with at least 4 apparently interacting.

******************************

 

IC 1371 = MCG -01-54-013 = PGC 66578

21 20 15.6 -04 52 36; Aqr

V = 13.6;  Size 1.1'x0.7';  PA = 13°

 

24" (9/5/18): at 225x and 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated N-S, ~35"x25", very small slightly brighter nucleus.  A trio of stars is 4' W, including two mag 11 stars.  IC 1371 is located 22' SW of mag 5.9 16 Aquarii.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1371 = J. 1-423 on 15 Sep 1892. His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1373 = MCG +00-54-013 = CGCG 375-029 = PGC 66589

21 20 37.2 +01 05 33; Aqr

V = 14.2;  Size 0.8'x0.7'

 

24" (9/5/18): at 375x: fairly faint, small, round, 18" diameter.  Located 9' S of mag 8.0 HD 203173.  Also a mag 9.3 star is 6' N and several other brighter stars are scattered around.

 

UGC 11724, located 2.7' S, was an extremely faint, ghostly streak oriented NW-SE.  It only occasionally popped into visibility.

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1373 = Spitaler 28 on 25 Sep 1891.  He described "Faint, round nebula of 1/4' diameter and similar to a mag 13 star.  Large, fuzzy core = mag 14. There is a whole nest of very faint nebula in this area; the observed one is the northernmost and most easily visible of 3.  Since UGC 11724 is just south of IC 1371, he likely saw the UGC.

******************************

 

IC 1375 = CGCG 401-015 = PGC 66603

21 20 59.8 +03 59 08; Equ

V = 14.2;  Size 0.4'x0.4'

 

17.5" (10/13/01): faint, very small, round, 15" diameter, weak concentration.  A mag 14 star lies 2.0' NE.  A mag 15 star at the north edge was not seen in mediocre seeing.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1375 = J. 1-426 on 5 Oct 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1377 = MCG +01-54-009 = CGCG 401-021 = PGC 66722

21 25 26.6 +04 18 52; Equ

V = 14.1;  Size 0.6'x0.4'

 

17.5" (11/25/00): faint, small, round, 25" diameter, very weak concentration.  Forms an obtuse angle with a mag 11 star 4' due south and a mag 10.5 star 5' NE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1377 = J. 1-427 on 9 Oct 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1379 = CGCG 375-034 = PGC 66741

21 26 01.1 +03 05 48; Equ

V = 14.7;  Size 0.7'x0.4'

 

17.5" (7/22/01): extremely faint, very small, elongated 2:1 ~N-S, 20"x10".  Located 1' E of a mag 13.5 star and 1.6' SE a mag 11.5 star.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1379 = J. 1-428 on 29 Jul 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1381 = MCG +00-54-016 = CGCG 375-036 = PGC 66789

21 27 33.7 -01 11 19; Aqr

V = 14.6;  Size 0.8'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 60°

 

18" (8/14/07): extremely faint, very small, slightly elongated SW-NE, 20"x15".  IC 1383 lies 5.4' NNE.  Located 10' SE of a mag 10 star and 28' NNW of NGC 7069.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1381 = J. 1-430, along with IC 1383 and 1385, on 6 Nov 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1382 = NGC 7056 = UGC 11734 = MCG +03-54-008 = CGCG 449-019 = PGC 66641

21 22 07.5 +18 39 56; Peg

V = 12.9;  Size 1.0'x0.9';  Surf Br = 12.7

 

See observing notes for NGC 7056.

 

Truman Safford found IC 1382 = Sf. 55 on 29 Sep 1866 and recorded "pF, pS, iF."  There is nothing at his position, but Harold Corwin found his RA is nearly five minutes larger than NGC 7056 and a good match in declination.  Although not certain, Corwin concludes "NGC 7056 is probably equal to IC 1382.".

******************************

 

IC 1383 = CGCG 375-037 = PGC 66792

21 27 39.6 -01 06 08; Aqr

V = 15.4;  Size 0.6'x0.2';  PA = 126°

 

18" (8/14/07): extremely faint and small, 10"x5" NW-SE.  Situated between two mag 10.5-11 stars oriented NW-SE with a separation of 4'.  Located 5.4' NNE of IC 1381.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1383 = J. 1-431, along with IC 1381 and 1385, on 6 Nov 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1384 = MCG +00-54-017 = CGCG 375-039 = PGC 66796

21 27 53.1 -01 22 07; Aqr

V = 14.7;  Size 0.6'x0.5'

 

18" (8/14/07): extremely faint, very small, round, 0.3' diameter, very low even surface brightness.  Two mag 15.5 stars are less than 1' W and a third is a 1' NW.  Located 17' N of NGC 7069.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1384 = J. 1-432 on 6 Nov 1891. His position is ~1' too far north.

******************************

 

IC 1385 = MCG +00-54-022 = CGCG 375-042 = PGC 66832

21 28 51.2 -01 04 12; Aqr

V = 15.0;  Size 0.5'x0.5'

 

18" (8/14/07): extremely faint, very small, round, 21" diameter.  Farthest north in a group of 5 IC galaxies to the north of NGC 7069.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1385 = J. 1-433, along with IC 1381 and 1385, on 6 Nov 1891 Discovered by Javelle.

******************************

 

IC 1386 = ESO 599-016 = MCG -04-50-030 = PGC 66852

21 29 37.4 -21 11 44; Cap

V = 13.2;  Size 1.1'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 131°

 

24" (9/8/18): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, broad concetration but no distinct core. A nice pair of star (~11" separation) lies 3.8' SSW and a wider fainter pair (15" separation) is 3.0' ENE.  Located 3.2° NW of M30.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1386 = J. 1-434 on 22 Aug 1892. His position is accurate.  It's curious, though, that he described this galaxy as "bi-nuclear or a nebulous double star", as it is only a single E/S0 type.

******************************

 

IC 1387 = MCG +00-54-026 = CGCG 375-045 = PGC 66851

21 29 34.5 -01 21 03; Aqr

V = 14.5;  Size 0.4'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.0

 

18" (8/14/07): faint, small, elongated 3:2 SSW-NNE, 24"x16", low even surface brightness.  A mag 14 star lies 27" N.  Located 28' NE of NGC 7069 and furthest east in a group of 5 IC galaxies discovered by Javelle about 1.5 degrees SW of M2.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1387 = J. 1-435 on 6 Nov 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1388 = MCG +00-54-027 = CGCG 375-046 = Ark 548 = PGC 66857

21 29 52.2 -00 37 53; Aqr

V = 14.1;  Size 0.7'x0.35';  PA = 137°

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated NNW-SSE, 25"x20", well concentrated with a very small bright core surrounded by a faint, thin halo.  Located 54' WNW of the gorgeous globular cluster M2.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1388 = Sw. X-50 on 8 Sep 1891 and reported "eF; vS; v wide D * nr nf."  His position is 2' SSE of CGCG 375-046 = PGC 66857 and the description matches.

******************************

 

IC 1391 = MCG +00-55-007 = CGCG 376-010 = PGC 67002

21 35 00.4 -00 30 41; Aqr

V = 15.0;  Size 0.6'x0.45';  PA = 84°

 

24" (9/8/18): at 260x; very faint, very small, round, 20" diameter, low surface brightness.  A mag 15 star is 1' SW. Located only 30' NE of the center of showpiece globular cluster M2.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1391 = J. 1-438 on 3 Aug 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1392 = UGC 11772 = MCG +06-47-003 = KTG 73A = PGC 67017

21 35 32.8 +35 23 53; Cyg

V = 11.5;  Size 1.6'x1.3';  Surf Br = 12.2;  PA = 75°

 

24" (10/18/12): fairly bright, moderately large, oval 4:3 WSW-ENE, 0.7'x0.45'.  Sharply concentrated with a high surface brightness 25" core and quasi-stellar nucleus.  The outer halo is much fainter and extends ~45".  A mag 12.8 star is 50" NE and a similar mag 12.5 star is 40" SW.  Several additional stars including a close double are off the SW side.  UGC 11775 lies 4.2' SE (attached to a star).

 

17.5" (8/11/96): fairly faint, small, elongated 5:3 SW-NE, 0.8'x0.5', moderately high surface brightness with a brighter core.  Situated within a short string of three stars with a mag 12.5 star 0.9' NNE and two mag 12 stars 0.8' and 1.2' SSW.  The further southern star has a mag 15 companion close following [9" separation] and there are also two mag 14.5-15.5 stars following the nearer mag 12 star off the south side.  Forms a pair with faint UGC 11775 4.2' SE.

 

17.5" (7/16/93): fairly faint, small, elongated 3:2 WSW-ENE, 0.6'x 0.4'.  A mag 13 star is 0.9' NNE of center.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1392 = Sf 50 on 12 Sep 1866 with the 18.5-inch refractor at the Dearborn Observatory and recorded "pB, vmbM, nebulous *."  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1393 = ESO 531-20 = MCG -04-51-009 = PGC 67147 = PGC 67148

21 40 14.2 -22 24 40; Cap

V = 14.6;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 172°

 

18" (8/9/10): very faint, very small, elongated 3:2 N-S, 24"x16", very weak concentration.  This member of ACO S963 is located 2.7' ENE of NGC 7104 between a mag 13 star 2.3' NW and a mag 10.3 star 3.3' SE.

 

18" (8/12/07): very faint, very small, elongated 2:1 N-S, 20"x10", very faint stellar nucleus with direct vision.  Located 2.7' ENE of NGC 7104 within cluster ACO S963.

 

17.5" (10/13/90): very faint, very small, round, small bright core.  Third brightest in the NGC 7103 group (ACO S963) with NGC 7104 2.7' WSW, NGC 7103 6.4' SW and IC 5122 6.5' W.

 

Ormond Stone discovered IC 1393 = LM-Southern 823 on 16 Oct 1886.  His micrometric position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1394 = MCG +02-55-006 = CGCG 427-011 = KAZ 688 = PGC 67145

21 40 13.0 +14 37 59; Peg

V = 13.7;  Size 0.9'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 0°

 

24" (9/16/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 30" diameter, contains a well defined small bright nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1394 = Sw. VIII-100 on 14 Sep 1887 and reported "eF; S; R."  His RA is 7 seconds too small, within his usual errors.

******************************

 

IC 1396 = LBN 451 = LBN 452 = Sh 2-131 = Ced 195 = Cr 439 = Tr 37 = Lund 995

21 39 06 +57 30; Cep

Size 170'x140'

 

17.5" (8/22/98): the "Elephant's Trunk" is an unusual cometary globule (associated with star formation) on the west side of IC 1396, a huge but faint HII complex. The highest contrast was using a UHC filter at 100x.  A 15'x5' lane was evident oriented WSW-ENE, particularly by gently rocking the scope back and forth. The "tail" of the globule or elephant's "trunk" heads west and is weakly illuminated on the edges, particularly on the south side.  Near the "head" is a mag 9 star (HD 239710) and a pretty double star (∑2813 = 9.2/9.6 at 10") to the west is embedded in the lane.  With careful viewing the "trunk" shows variations in width and opacity.  The head is located ~18' W of the triple star ∑2816 (5.8/7.7/7.8 at 12"/20").

 

17.5" (8/12/96): This HII region is most prominent with a UHC filter at 100x surrounding the triple star (HD 206267 = ∑2816 = 5.8/7.7/7.8 at 12" and 20") at the center of a scattered cluster although nebulosity is not apparent throughout the field.  About 25' away is also a pretty double star whose components are aligned with the triple star.  The surrounding 1° field contains a scattered cluster of brighter stars which are fairly uniformly distributed.

 

In the 16x80 finder unfiltered, the entire cluster is clearly encased in a faint glow at least two degrees in diameter though the nebulosity seems to be more prominent along the curving lanes of the cluster.  The Daystar 300 filter gives a mild enhancement but dims the stars so the overall view is not as pleasing.  Mu Cephei (Herschel's Garnet Star) is at the northeast edge of the nebulosity, ~1.5° from the center.

 

18" (7/11/10): Barnard 161 is an easy 6' circular dark patch within IC 1396 (north of center) just 13' N of ∑2819 = 7.4/8.7 at 13" and 25' NE of the triple star ∑2816 = 5.8/7.7/7.8 at 12" and 20".  Stands out fairly well at 73x.  There are extensions to the north of this cometary dark nebula that I didn't see.

 

16x80 (9/29/84 and 8/26/89): using a UHC filter appears as a very large, irregular nebulous glow (about 2° diameter).  Very faint but definite when compared without filter.  Surrounds ∑2816 = 5.8/7.7 at 12" and a large, faint, scattered star group.  Visible without a filter as an extremely large, hazy region surrounding ∑2816 and fainter stars.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1396 on a photographic plate taken with the Willard lens in 1893.  He commented in "Photographic Nebulosities and Star Clusters connected with the Milky Way" (Astr. & Astro-Phys. 13, 177-182 (1894)) that "A magnificent specimen of these [nebulous masses] I have found on one of my plates in Cepheus which was given an exposure of seven hours.  This a mixture of bright stars and nebulosity.  The diffused portion of this nebulosity conforms in its peculiarities with the general structure of the Milky Way, showing it be actually mixed up with the ground work of star.  The brightest star of this group is DM +56° 2617."

******************************

 

IC 1398 = MCG +01-55-009 = CGCG 402-017 = PGC 67306

21 45 51.4 +09 28 31; Peg

V = 14.6;  Size 0.9'x0.4';  PA = 70°

 

24" (8/12/18): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated E-W, 0.5'x0.4', diffuse with only a weak concentration.  A mag 9.5 star is 2.3' ENE.  Located 34' SE of mag 2.4 Enif (Epsilon Peg).

 

CGCG 402-020, situated 7.3' NE, appeared extremely faint, small, elongated N-S, perhaps 0.4'x0.2 diameter.

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1398 = Spitaler 29 on 6 Nov 1891.  He reported "Very faint nebula of 1/4' diameter, central condensation = star 15. Slightly fainter than nebula NGC 7132."  His micrometric position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1401 = UGC 11810 = MCG +00-55-015 = CGCG 376-031 = PGC 67339

21 46 59.5 +01 42 45; Aqr

V = 13.8;  Size 1.8'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.9;  PA = 175°

 

17.5" (8/8/02): fairly faint, moderately large, very elongated 7:2 N-S, 1.1'x0.3', brighter core.  A faint star is superimposed on the SE end.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1401 = J. 1-442 on 5 Nov 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1405 = UGC 11826 = MCG +00-55-020 = CGCG 376-037 = PGC 67470

21 50 49.8 +02 01 15; Aqr

V = 13.8;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 115°

 

24" (9/5/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, weak concentration.  A mag 13.5/14.5 double star (~8" separation) lies 45" NW.  Forms a pair with IC 1406 4.2' SE.

 

17.5" (8/8/02): very faint, very small, round.  A very faint close double star is just off the NW edge [40" from the center].  Forms a pair with IC 1406 4.2' ESE, which was not seen.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1405 = J. 1-445 on 5 Nov 1891 .  MCG misidentifies MCG +00-55-20 as IC 1406, but the MCG designation applies to IC 1405.

******************************

 

IC 1406 = CGCG 376-038 = PGC 67478

21 51 04.9 +01 59 13; Aqr

V = 14.6;  Size 0.6'x0.45';  PA = 65°

 

24" (9/5/18): at 375x; faint, small, round, 20" diameter.  Forms a pair with slightly brighter and larger IC 1405, which is situated 4.2' NW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1406 = J. 1-446 on 5 Nov 1891.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1407 = CGCG 376-048 = II Zw 152 = PGC 67538

21 52 23.4 +03 25 38; Peg

Size 0.6'x0.5'

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; faint or fairly faint, small, round, 24" diameter, very faint stellar nucleus.  This is a double system (II Zw 152), but the nearly stellar companion (PGC 67535) at the WNW edge was not resolved.  Located 8' NNE of NGC 7149 and 10' SW of mag 8.7 SAO 127130.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1407 = J. 1-447 on 4 Aug 1892.  His position is 45" too far south (probably due to an error in the position of his offset star).  RNGC, PGC and HyperLEDA misidentify IC 1407 as NGC 7148.  The CGCG doesn't CGCG 376-048 as IC 1407.

******************************

 

IC 1411 = UGC 11850 = MCG +00-56-001 = CGCG 377-001 = PGC 67660

21 56 00.6 -01 31 01; Aqr

V = 14.2;  Size 0.8'x0.5';  PA = 38°

 

24" (8/12/18): at 375x; moderately bright, fairly small, compact, slightly elongated, 20" diameter, sharply concentrated with a very bright small core.  The core is surrounded by a very low surface brightness but it was too faint to estimate a size or orientation.  A mag 14.8 star is 50" NE of center.

 

CGCG 377-022, situated 7.8' SSE of IC 1411, appeared extremely faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  Situated just west of a N-S string of stars with a mag 10.6 star 1.6' ENE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1411 = J. 1-451 on 6 Nov 1891.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1414 = CGCG 403-008 = II Zw 157 = WBL 675-002 = PGC 67762

21 58 18.0 +08 25 26; Peg

V = 14.3;  Size 0.7'x0.6'

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, small, round, very small bright core, high surface brightness, 25" diameter.  Brightest in a trio (WBL 675) with CGCG 403-007 3.3' SSW and CGCG 403-010 5.6' ENE.

 

CGCG 403-007: very faint, very small, round, low surface brightness, 20" diameter.

CGCG 403-010: faint, small, round, low surface brightness, 25" diameter.

 

Rudlolph Spitaler discovered IC 1414 = Spitatler 30 on 25 Oct 1891 and reported "sky conditions excellent. Very faint, round nebula of 1/4' diameter. About 20" south of it, a little ahead, is a mag 15 star and further south a mag 13.5 star."  There is nothing at his position, though preceding are 3 CGCG galaxies, with MCG (and apparently PGC) selecting 403-010 as IC 1414.  But Harold Corwin recomputed the position using accurate coordinates for the offset star, and found it fell close to CGCG 403-008.  Visually this was the brightest of the trio, which makes this identification pretty secure.

******************************

 

IC 1415

21 58 42.4 +01 21 26; Aqr

 

17.5" (11/28/97): a mag 15-15.5 star was observed at Bigourdan's position.

 

By coincidence there is an 18th magnitude galaxy close southeast of this star which I could not see and this galaxy is certainly too faint to have been detected by Bigourdan.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1415 = Big. 229, along with IC 1416, on 27 Oct 1888.  He found these searching for NGC 7164.  Harold Corwin concludes both of these numbers either refer to faint stars or are nonexistent.  See both Corwin's and Malcolm Thomson's IC notes for the full story.

******************************

 

IC 1417 = MCG -02-56-003 = PGC 67811

22 00 21.6 -13 08 50; Aqr

V = 13.7;  Size 1.4'x0.4';  PA = 109°

 

24" (9/22/17): at 260x and 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, very elongated, 3:1 or 7:2 WNW-ESE, 0.9'x0.3', contains a small brighter elongated core with faint extensions, a mag 15 star is at or just off the ESE end.  Located 12' NW of NGC 7171.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1417 = J. 1-454 on 4 Nov 1891.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1420 = UGC 11880 = MCG +03-56-005 = PGC 67900

22 02 31.7 +19 45 02; Peg

V = 13.1;  Size 1.4'x1.3';  Surf Br = 13.6

 

24" (9/27/14): at 375x I found the view of this object confusing.  It appeared fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, generally oval E-W, ~30"x20" but sometimes it appeared elongated 2:1 at 40"x20".  Sometimes a very compact nucleus (or companion) appeared as a brighter knot, just east of center.  A mag 13.5 star is 0.6' N.

 

17.5" (7/27/95): faint, small, elongated 3:2 E-W, 30"x20", broad very weak concentration with no distinct core.  A mag 13.5 star lies 30" N of center.  There appears to a brighter spot at the east end. This is a compact companion listed in NED as IC 1420 NED02 and in LEDA as PGC 93140.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1420 = Sw. IX-97 on 18 Sep 1889 and recorded "eeF; pS; R; bet 2 nr F stars in meridian."  His position is 19 sec of RA due west of UGC 11880 and his description is appropriate.  Herbert Howe measured an accurate position around 1900 with the Clark refractor at Denver, though Dreyer didn't include the correction in the IC 2 Notes section.

******************************

 

IC 1422 = CGCG 377-016 = PGC 67922

22 03 00.1 +02 35 56; Peg

V = 15.2;  Size 0.5'x0.3'

 

24" (9/5/18): at 375x; very faint, very small, round, only 12" diameter.  A mag 14 star is 1.4' SE and a mag 15.3 star is 1.0' NW.  Brighter IC 1425 lies 6' E.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1422 = J. 2-794, along with IC 1425 and 1428, on 19 Aug 1893.  His position is less than 30" too far north, although neither CGCG, PGC or HyperLEDA linked IC 1422 with their equivalent catalog entries.

******************************

 

IC 1425 = CGCG 377-018 = PGC 67939

22 03 24.5 +02 35 42; Peg

V = 14.0;  Size 0.7'x0.6'

 

24" (9/5/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, gradually increases to a very small bright nucleus.  IC 1422 lies 6' W and IC 1428 is 16' ENE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1425 = J. 3-795, along with IC 1422 and 1428, on 19 Aug 1893.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1427 = UGC 11889 = MCG +02-56-010 = CGCG 428-025 = PGC 67948

22 03 35.2 +15 06 24; Peg

V = 13.7;  Size 1.0'x0.8';  PA = 103°

 

24" (9/5/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, small bright core, occasional stellar nucleus.  Surrounded by several mag 15 stars.  A mag 10.7 star is 3.3' W and a nice asterism with 9 stars in a 2' group lies ~10' W.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1427 = Sf. 52 on 14 Sep 1866 and reported "vF, vS, Neb M[iddle]."  His position is 15 seconds of RA too far west.  There are no other nearby galaxies so this identification is secure.

******************************

 

IC 1428 = CGCG 377-021 = PGC 67979

22 04 27.7 +02 37 51; Peg

V = 15.2;  Size 0.7'x0.35';  PA = 61°

 

24" (9/5/18): at 375x; very faint, very small, elongated 3:2 SW-NE, 25"x15", low surface brightness.  A mag 14.5 star is 45" S and a mag 9.5 star is 3' SW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1428 = J. 2-79, along with IC 1422 and 1425, on 19 Aug 1893. His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1430 = LEDA 936014

22 07 29.8 -13 34 52; Aqr

Size 0.5'x0.4';  PA = 55°

 

24" (9/7/18): very faint, small, round, 20" diameter, low surface brightness.  Located 5.5' W of mag 8.8 HD 2110032.  Forms a pair (same redshift) with IC 1431 4.8' NNE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1430 = J. 1-460, along with IC 1431, on 26 Aug 1892.  There is nothing at either of his positions, but apparently he made a 1.0 minute error in RA (too large).  I found he misidentified his offset star, which was  HD 210032.  Once corrected, his offsets match two small galaxies.   This galaxy isn't included in the original PGC and HyperLEDA doesn't label LEDA 936014 as IC 1413.

******************************

 

IC 1431 = MCG -02-56-015 = PGC 68087

22 07 39.6 -13 30 48; Aqr

Size 0.7'x0.6'

 

24" (9/7/18): very faint, small, round, 30", diffuse, low surface brightness.  A faint mag 15 star is 1' W. Forms a similar pair with IC 1431 4.8' SSW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1431 = J. 1-461, along with IC 1430, on 26 Aug 1892.  See IC 1430.

******************************

 

IC 1434 = Cr 445

22 10 30 +52 50; Lac

Size 8'

 

17.5" (7/29/92): about 100 stars in a 15' diameter.  Three mag 9 stars form a triangle on the south side.  The extensions almost fill the 20' field.  Long sprays of stars intersect near the center at a mag 10.5 star.  A long ray extends ENE for 11' and contains 30 stars.  A ray to the WSW of 11' length has 16 stars including a close triple star.  There are two more sprays to the NW of 6' length.  The cluster has no distinct borders.  The surrounding Lacerta Milky Way region is breathtaking with a 20 mm Nagler.  Located 2.1° WNW of mag 4.4 Beta Lacertae.

 

8" (8/12/83): ~50 stars at 200x, over haze, includes two strings on the east side, brighter stars at the south edge.

 

Rev. Thomas Espin discovered IC 1434 around 1893 with his 17.3-inch reflector at his private observatory in England while sweeping for red stars.  He recorded "A remarkable cluster with six distinct radiating branches.  Stars from 12 to 15."  His rough position is fairly accurate.  IC 1434 was confirmed as an open cluster in 2011A&A...530A..32B ("Star clusters or asterisms? 2MASS CMD and structural analyses of 15 challenging targets.") at a distance of roughly 8500 +/- 2000 light years.

******************************

 

IC 1435 = ESO 601-030 = MCG -04-52-025 = AM 2210-222 = PGC 68320

22 13 26.3 -22 05 48; Aqr

Size 1.1'x0.7';  PA = 9°

 

24" (9/6/18): at 282x; moderately bright, fairly small, elongated 3:2 N-S, 30"x20", contains a round brighter core.

 

ESO 532-034, situated 21' S, appeared fairly faint (surprisingly easy), slightly elongated SW-NE, 30"x25", impression of a bar through the center.  An elongated N-S group of at least 8 stars is immediately to the west.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1435 = J. 1-463 on 25 Jul 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1437 = UGC 11965 = MCG +00-56-016 = CGCG 377-042 = PGC 68438

22 15 45.1 +02 03 57; Lac

V = 13.5;  Size 1.0'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.2

 

17.5" (8/8/02): fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 0.8'x0.7', weak concentration.  Located 7.6' NE of mag 8.2 HD 211212.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1437 = J. 1-465 on 5 Nov 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1438 = ESO 602-001 = MCG -04-52-029 = KTS 68A = PGC 68469

22 16 29.1 -21 25 50; Aqr

V = 11.7;  Size 2.4'x2.0';  Surf Br = 13.3

 

24" (8/16/12): fairly bright, fairly large, sharply concentrated with a small very bright 20" core.  The core is surrounded by a large, roundish halo with a fairly even surface brightness, ~1.5' diameter.  IC 1439 lies 4.2' SE and UGCA 427 is 12' NE.

 

17.5" (7/25/95): moderately bright, moderately large, round, 1.5' diameter, even concentration to a bright core and faint, stellar nucleus.  A nearly perfect rectangle of mag 13 stars with sides of 2'x1.5' precedes by 4'.  Forms a pair with IC 1439 4.2' SE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1438 = J. 1-466, along with IC 1439, on 20 Jul 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1439 = ESO 602-002 = KTS 68B = PGC 68476

22 16 40.1 -21 29 09; Aqr

V = 13.7;  Size 1.3'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 27°

 

24" (8/16/12): fairly faint, fairly small, oval 3:2 SSW-NNE, ~30"x20".  Fainter of a pair with IC 1438 4.2' NW.

 

17.5" (7/25/95): very faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 SSW-NNE, 1.0'x0.5', slightly brighter core.  Forms a pair with brighter IC 1438 4.2' NW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1439 = J. 1-467, along with IC 1438, on 20 Jul 1892.

******************************

 

IC 1441 = MCG +06-48-023 = CGCG 513-021 = CGCG 514-001 = WBL 679-002 = PGC 68413

22 15 19.2 +37 18 06; Lac

V = 14.7;  Size 1.0'x0.5;  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 35°

 

17.5" (7/15/93): third of 7 in the NGC 7242 group.  Extremely faint, very small, slightly elongated, very low even surface brightness.  In a close trio with NGC 7240 1.4' SE and IC 5192 1.5' SSW.  A mag 11 star is 1.9' WNW.

 

17.5" (7/28/92): extremely faint, very small, elongated 2:1 SSW-NNE.  A mag 11 star is 2' W.  Forms a close pair with brighter NGC 7240 1.2' SE.  Faintest in the NGC 7242 group with NGC 7242 4' E and IC 5191 3.5' WNW.  Appears about 0.5 mag fainter than the 15.3p magnitude in the CGCG.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1441 = Big. 233 on 5 Dec 1888 with the 12" refractor at Lick Observatory.  It is shown on his discovery sketch of IC 5192, 5192, 5193, and labeled as nebula "e".  Bigourdan independently discovered this galaxy on 25 Sep 1889 and measured an accurate position.  As Barnard's sketch wasn't published until 1906, Bigourdan was unaware of his observation and Bigourdan was credited with the discovery in the IC 1.

******************************

 

IC 1442

22 15 59 +53 59 06; Lac

V = 9.1;  Size 3.5'

 

17.5" (8/5/94): about three dozen stars in a distinctive curving row oriented SW-NE about 4' diameter with fainter loops at both ends.  A mag 9 star SAO 34248 is off the SE and a mag 10 star SAO 34250 is off the NE end.  Unconcentrated but stands out well at low power (100x).  Located 20' SE of NGC 7245.

 

Rev. Thomas Espin discovered IC 1442 in 1893 with his 17-inch reflector at his private observatory in England (no specific day given in his discovery paper).  He recorded "haze round some dozen faint stars."  His position is about 5' too far northeast and this error was repeated in modern sources.

 

Cederblad catalogued this object as Ced 202 based on the IC description of "Cl of neb stars", but there is no nebulosity.

******************************

 

IC 1443 = ESO 602-005 = MCG -04-52-033 = PGC 68558

22 19 03.7 -20 56 24; Aqr

V = 12.5;  Size 1.5'x1.2';  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 42°

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, small, round, 24" diameter, moderate concentration to a small bright core and stellar nucleus.  Located 9' NE of mag 8.6 HD 211580 and 14' SSE of mag 7.2 HD 211600.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1443 = J. 1-469 on 22 Aug 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1445 = ESO 602-019 = MCG -03-57-007 = PGC 68826

22 25 30.3 -17 14 36; Aqr

V = 12.7;  Size 1.5'x1.1';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 80°

 

18" (10/16/09): fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter.  Contains a bright stellar nucleus or a faint star is superimposed.

 

Ormond Stone discovered IC 1445 = LM(S) 833 on 13 Oct 1887. The position was measured several times and the offsets point directly to ESO 602-019 = PGC 68826.

******************************

 

IC 1447 = MCG -01-57-014 = PGC 68996

22 29 59.8 -05 07 12; Aqr

V = 12.8;  Size 1.4'x0.8';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 100°

 

24" (9/27/14): moderately bright, oval 5:3 ~E-W, 50"x30", fades out at east and west ends, broad concentration.  Contains a large, bulging brighter core but no obvious nucleus.  Located 1.4' S of mag 9.3 HD 213214. This is a relatively bright galaxy to be missed in the NGC.

 

Edward Swift discovered IC 1447 = Sw. X-51 on 29 Sep 1891 and recorded "eeeF; pS; R; Munich 12516 3' n; Found searching for Comet Tempel-Swift."  The position is 3.6' too far east-southeast.  Herbert Howe measured an accurate RA (13 sec further east than Swift).

******************************

 

IC 1448 = NGC 7308 = MCG -02-57-017 = PGC 69194

22 34 32.1 -12 56 02; Aqr

V = 13.7;  Size 1.3'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 145°

 

24" (9/29/16): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, 25"-30" diameter, slightly elongated, reasonably high surface brightness.  Gradually increases to a very small brighter nucleus.  Resides in a barren star field.

 

NGC 7308 forms a pair with MCG -02-57-018 4' ENE.  The companion is faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 NW-SE, 25"x10", low even surface brightness.  MCG -02-57-019 was also picked up 14' NE (again in star-poor field). It was logged as very faint, very small, elongated 3:2 NW-SE, 18"x12".  A mag 13.5 star is 1.7' WSW.

 

17.5" (9/15/90): faint, small, round, bright core.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1448 = J. 472 on 2 Nov 1891.  His position matches PGC 69194.  This galaxy was first discovered by Leavenworth in 1885 and catalogued as LM 1-253 (= NGC 7308), but his rough position led Javelle to think his object was new.  Herbert Howe was able to recover NGC 7308 in 1899-1900 at the University of Denver and measured an accurate position.  So, IC 1448 = NGC 7308.

******************************

 

IC 1452 = NGC 7374B = MCG +02-58-006 = CGCG 430-005 = Holm 798b = PGC 69675

22 45 59.2 +10 52 03; Peg

V = 14.7;  Size 0.3'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.0

 

24" (10/1/16): at 260x; with direct vision a sharp mag 14.5-14.8 "star" is easily visible.  But averted vision revealed the sharp stellar nucleus of this galaxy is surrounded by a very small halo, ~6"-8" diameter.  The halo was not difficult to pick out with averted once noticed.  IC 1452 forms a close pair (less than 1' NNW) with NGC 7374.

 

24" (7/29/16): at 260x; faint, virtually stellar (uncertain if a star).  IC 1452 forms a double system with NGC 7374 [centers separated by 56"].  Apparently I only viewed the stellar nucleus of this galaxy.

 

17.5" (8/20/88): very faint, extremely small, round.  Forms a double system with NGC 7374 57" SSE.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1452 = B. 235 on 10 Oct 1890.  Both Malcolm Thomson and Harold Corwin noticed a six-degree error in the IC polar distance compared to Bigourdan's original position (1860 coordinations) in his 5th Comptes Rendus list.  Once corrected, his position matches CGCG 430-005 = PGC 69675. The CGCG, MCG, PGC, SIMBAD and HyperLeda (and secondary sources) don't label this galaxy as IC 1452.  The RNGC identifies this galaxy as NGC 7374B.

******************************

 

IC 1454 = Abell 81 = PK 117+18.1 = PN G117.5+18.9

22 42 25.0 +80 26 32; Cep

V = 14.4;  Size 34"x31"

 

24" (10/3/13): at 225x using an NPB filter, IC 1454 (Abell 81) appeared fairly bright, round, 30" diameter, crisp-edged.  The planetary displayed a relatively large, brighter rim that was unevenly lit, and a small (~12"), slightly darker center.  Unfiltered the annularity was more difficult to confirm, though the rim appeared slightly brighter on the south side.  A pair of 14th magnitude stars are just off the NE side and a mag 13.4 star is 1' SE.  Situated 4.3' W of mag 7 HD 215867.

 

18" (10/13/07): easily swept up at 175x, located 4' W of mag 7.0 HD 215867.  Compared views unfiltered and with UHC, OIII and NPB filters.  Best seen using OIII, though NPB gave the most natural view with brighter stars. Two faint mag 14/15 stars are very near the NE edge (brighter star barely off edge) with a brighter mag 13 star 1' SE.  At 225x using the NPB filter, IC 1454 appeared round, ~25-30" in diameter with an impression of an irregular surface brightness.  The rim sometimes appeared slightly brighter with a weaker center giving a very subtle annularity.

 

18" (10/9/04): easily picked up at 73x just 4' WNW of a 7th magnitude star as a small, well-defined disc.  Visible unfiltered at 160x; a couple of mag 14/15 stars are barely off the NE edge of the planetary and a 13th magnitude star lies 1' SE.  Good contrast gain with OIII filter.  The disc was perfectly round, ~25" diameter with a very crisp edge.  The surface brightness appeared a bit irregular but could not verify annularity at this power.

 

17.5" (10/13/01): picked up at 100x without filter as a faint, small disc situated 4' WNW of a mag 7 star.  Excellent contrast gain with an OIII filter and appears as a round, 25" crisp-edged disc.  At 220x without filter a faint mag 14/15 pair is at the NE edge.  Very nice view using a UHC filter at 140x-220x; the PN was slightly elongated ~E-W but no other details are visible.

 

17.5" (8/8/91): moderately bright, fairly small, almost round, slightly elongated E-W, 30" diameter.  A faint double star mag 14/15 is at the NE edge.  Located 3.8' WNW of mag 7 SAO 3785.  No central star visible.  Pretty planetary at 220x without filter.

 

13.1" (8/11/85): at 88x and OIII filter, fairly faint, fairly small, round.  Located 4' W of a mag 7 star that detracts from viewing.  At 166x with a UHC filter; easy to view, moderately large.  Two very faint stars are involved near the NE edge.

 

William Denning discovered IC 1454 on 9 Aug 1891 with his 10-inch reflector (announced in Observatory, 15, 104).  He noted it was "rather a difficult object, except on a good night, though I picked it up with a power of only 40.  It is noteworthy as being situated in the midst of a region containing very few nebulae."  IC 1454 was found by Abell in 1955 on the POSS and listed as #67 of 73 new planetary nebulae.  Abell recognized the earlier IC designation but included it in his list as it wasn't previously recognized as a planetary.  In his second list (1966) IC 1454 was renumbered as Abell 81.

******************************

 

IC 1455 = UGC 12232 = MCG +00-58-011 = CGCG 379-014 = PGC 69943

22 53 46.1 +01 22 19; Psc

V = 13.5;  Size 1.0'x0.6';  PA = 35°

 

24" (9/6/18): at 375x; moderately bright, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, moderate surface brightness, contains a small brighter nucleus.  A mag 14 star 1.2' SW and a mag 12 star 1.9' SW are collinear with the galaxy.  Located 27' NE of NGC 7396, which is the brightest in a group of galaxies including NGCs 7397, 7398, 7401 and 7402.  Also situated 26' NW of mag 6.1 HD 216701 (1 Piscium).

 

Sherburne Burnham discovered IC 1455 on 23 Sep 1891 with the 36-inch Lick refractor.  While searching for NGC 7403 he commented there was nothing at Coolidge's place but he found "a moderately bright nebula, which is probably the object in question."

 

Spitaler found it again just two weeks later on 6 Oct with the 27-inch refractor at Vienna University Observatory.  Spitaler reported, "Faint, round nebula of 1/4' - 1/2' diameter, brighter middle, forming a right-angled triangle with two stars mag 11 with the nebula at the right angle. Between the nebula and the preceding star 11 there is a star 12 closer to the star than to the nebula. I do not see the nebula NGC 7403. It's curious that Coolidge did not notice my nova; or is NGC 7403 identical to the Nova?"  But Coolidge's object is probably a single star, like all his other reported discoveries.

******************************

 

IC 1458 = MCG -01-58-007 = PGC 70080

22 56 41.4 -07 22 45; Aqr

V = 13.6;  Size 1.3'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 144°

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; faint or fairly faint, low surface brightness patch, irregularly round, ~0.6' diameter, slightly irregular surface brightness but no distinct core. Appears to be a face-on late-type spiral.  Located 10' E of mag 9.5 HD 216787.

 

18" (10/25/03): very faint, small, elongated 3:2 NNW-SSE, 1.0'x0.7', low even surface brightness.  A 15' string of stars oriented SW-NE with mag 9.5 SAO 146395 at the southwest end passes north of the galaxy.  A mag 9.5 star is 10' due west.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1458 = J. 1-477 on 17 Sep 1892.  His position is accurate.  See notes for NGC 7441, which Harold Corwin suggests may be an earlier discovery of this galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1459 = IC 5265 = ESO 406-030 = MCG -06-50-016 = PGC 70090

22 57 10.5 -36 27 45; Gru

V = 10.0;  Size 5.2'x3.8';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 40°

 

24" (8/1/19): extremely bright, large, slightly elongated, very sharp concentration with an intensely bright core and a very diffuse outer halo that fades out slowly, ~3.5'x3.0'.  Bracketed by two mag 11/12 stars ~3' W and ~3' E. Brightest in the Grus Chain and forms an excellent pair with IC 5264 6.6' SSW.

 

18" (10/25/08): very bright, fairly large, elongated 4:3 SW-NE, sharply concentrated with a very bright core.  The brightest portion of the halo extends 1.5'x1.1' and this is surrounded by a much dimmer outer envelope.  Bracketed by a mag 11 star 3' WNW of center and a mag 12 star 2.7' E.  This member of the Grus Chain of 9 galaxies is possibly the brightest southern galaxy missed by John Herschel.

 

17.5" (8/6/97): bright, fairly large, elongated ~5:4 SW-NE.  Well concentrated and dominated by a large, bright core.  The halo is quite extensive with averted vision and the dimensions are ~3.5'x3.0'.  Situated between a mag 11 star 3' WNW and a mag 12 star a similar distance following.  Brightest in a group including IC 5264 just 6' SSW.

 

17.5" (7/22/87): bright, fairly small, very bright core, slightly elongated halo SW-NE.  Located midway between a mag 11 star 3.0' WNW and mag 12 star 2.7' E.  Brightest in a large group of galaxies situated in a string N-S with IC 5264 6' SSW.

 

13" (10/20/84): bright, small, round, small bright nucleus, two stars at equal distance WNW and E.  Much easier than nearby IC 5269, IC 5270, IC 5273, NGC 7418 and NGC 7421!

 

8" (8/1/19): bright, moderately large, round, at least 1.5' diameter, sharp concentration with a very bright round core.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1459 on 13 Dec 1889 with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  While searching for Brorsen's Comet (5D/Brorsen), he ran across IC 1459 and several other NGC galaxies.  A position computed the next night is just 40" south of center.  Barnard published the discovery in a short note titled "An unsuccessful search for Brorsen's Comet 1889-90" in Astronomische Nachrichten 125, 43 (1890).  He mentions on the night of December 13th, "several unrecorded nebulae found.  One of these, in wide field with [NGC] 7418 and 7421 but not in NGC, deserves special notice.  It was small, about 1/2' in diameter, cometary and rather brighter, with a 12m nucleus."  He added "Careful filar-micrometer observations were made of it and will be printed in a list of nebulae measured here", but apparently this never occurred.  Two nights later he discovered IC 5264 when he reobserved the field. 

 

Lewis Swift independently discovered the galaxy on 10 Jun 1896 (other dates given in different publications) and described Sw. XI-220 (later IC 5265) as "B, cL, R, betw 2 stars p and f; nf of 2 [with IC 5264].  His position was 25 seconds of RA too large and 4' too far south, but the identification is certain.  He questioned if his object was identical to IC 1459 (in the first Lowe Observatory list in Astr. Journal).  It is.  Corwin notes that Dreyer questioned if IC 5265 might be identical to NGC 7418, but it's not.  Knox-Shaw included this galaxy in a list of new nebulae found at the Helwan Observatory and published in 1912.  He questioned if it was identical to IC 5295, but didn't make the connection with IC 1459.

******************************

 

IC 1461 = Mrk 311 = CGCG 430-036 = KUG 2256+149 = PGC 70153 = LEDA 3440653

22 58 34.3 +15 10 22; Peg

V = 14.4;  Size 0.55'x0.5'

 

24" (9/23/17): at 200x-375x; fairly faint, small, round, 24" diameter, very small brighter nucleus.

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, small, irregular round, 20" diameter, slightly brighter nucleus, irregular halo?  Located 8' SE of mag 8.6 HD 217104.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1461 = Sw. IX-98 on 20 Oct 1889 and reported "eeeF; vS; R."  There is nothing at his position, but 10' north is CGCG 430-036 and this is probably Swift's object.  Howe found this galaxy again 10 years later while searching for IC 1461 and measured an accurate position (repeated in the IC 2 Notes).

******************************

 

IC 1464 = MCG -02-58-020 = MCG -02-58-021 = PGC 70344 = PGC 70345

23 03 11.6 -08 59 27; Aqr

V = 13.8/14.4;  Size 0.8'

 

24" (9/7/18): IC 1464 is a a very close pair of elongated spirals (20" between centers) and the two components were often resolved at 375x.  IC 1464B, the brighter northwestern galaxy, was fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 ~SSW-NNE, ~30"x20", slightly brighter core.

 

IC 1464A, the southeastern galaxy, was less obvious, though it was seen as a distinct, very faint glow at the SE edge of the halo of 1464B, perhaps 25"x15" SW-NE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1464 = J. 1-479 on 2 Nov 1891.  His position is accurate.  This is a contact pair of elongated spirals and Javelle noted it appeared to be double.

******************************

 

IC 1466 = LEDA 135879

23 03 39.1 -02 46 32; Psc

V = 13.8;  Size 0.7'x0.6'

 

24" (9/6/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 30"x25", weak concentration.  IC 1467 and IC 1468 lie 33' SE.  These galaxies have nearly identical redshifts, so are part of the same group at z = .032.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1466 = J. 1-480 on 7 Nov 1891.  His position is accurate.  This galaxy is not included in the original PGC and HyperLEDA doesn't identify LEDA 135879 as IC 1466.

******************************

 

IC 1467 = MCG -01-58-017 = PGC 70413

23 04 49.7 -03 13 47; Psc

V = 14.4;  Size 0.8'x0.35';  PA = 3°

 

24" (9/6/18): faint or fairly faint, elongated 5:3 N-S, ~35"x20", even surface brightness.  Forms a pair (similar redshift) with IC 1468 4.7' ENE.  IC 1466 lies 33' NW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1467 = J. 1-481, along with nearby IC 1468, on 19 Sep 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1468 = MCG -01-58-019 = PGC 70429

23 05 07.6 -03 12 16; Psc

V = 14.1;  Size 1.2'x0.7';  PA = 151°

 

24" (9/6/18): faint or fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated NNW-SSE, 35"x25", weak concentration.  Forms a pair with IC 1467 4.7' WSW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1468 = J. 1-482, along with nearby IC 1467, on 19 Sep 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1470 = Sh 2-156 = Ced 208 = Hb 10 = PP 104 = GM 1-79

23 05 10.3 +60 14 37; Cep

Size 1.2'x0.75'

 

18" (9/24/05): small, high surface brightness elongated glow extending from an 11th magnitude star.  At 115x, the nebulosity was not noticeably enhanced with an OIII filter but the UHC filter improved the contrast.  Easily takes 225x and the oval nebula appears to hang to the south-southeast of the bright star. A faint, close, equal mag double (STI 1138 = 12.7/12.7 at 4.6") lies 2' west.  A fairly striking, uncatalogued 5'x4' ring of stars follows by 9'.  The NW star in the ring (QT Cep) is encased in a faint glow (BFS 17).

 

18" (8/17/04): at 220x, this is a fairly bright, moderately large, 1' tear-shaped glow extending from a 12th magnitude star.  Nebulosity extends most south and SE of the star. A close, faint double star lies 1.9' W.  Several extremely faint stars are nearby, including one just off the SE edge and one close NE.

 

17.5" (10/30/99): picked up at 100x using an OIII filter as a small, bright glow surrounding a mag 12 star.  Best view at 280x unfiltered.  The involved star is attached at the north edge and the 1' oval nebula appears to hang off the south side of the star.  Close west is a very close, evenly matched faint double star!

 

13.1" (9/22/84): appears as a mag 12 star with a faint but easily visible oval nebula surrounding the star.  Extends mainly SE with the 12th magnitude star at the tip.  Visible without a filter.  Similar to Hubble's Variable Nebula.

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1470 = Sp 62 on 20 Mar 1892 while observing Comet 1892 II (Denning).  Both C.F. Pechüle, as well as Barnard (AN 3110 and AJ 11), also found this emission nebula just a day later while observing the comet!

******************************

 

IC 1472 = CGCG 454-002 = MCG +03-59-004 = PGC 70573

23 09 06.7 +17 15 33; Peg

V = 14.1;  Size 0.9'x0.4'

 

18" (10/19/06): very faint, very small, slightly elongated ~E-W, 0.3'x0.2', weak concentration, occasional very faint stellar nucleus with direct vision.  Located 4.5' ENE of mag 10.3 DY Peg (well studied short period Delta Scuti variable (105 min period).

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1472 = Sp 32 on 25 Oct 1891 with the 27-inch refractor at the Vienna Observatory.  He reported finding a "Round nebula of 1/4' diameter, bright core. A mag 13 star is 1.5' northeast, a mag 15 is southeast of the nebula, so that the two stars form a equilateral triangle with the nebula.

******************************

 

IC 1473 = UGC 12404 = MCG +05-54-043 = CGCG 496-052 = PGC 70633

23 11 05.4 +29 38 36; Peg

V = 13.5;  Size 2.0'x1.0';  PA = 176°

 

24" (9/7/18): at 375x; either fairly faint or moderately bright, elongated 5:3 N-S, 50"x30".  Contains a brighter, roundish nucleus with an irregular surface brightness [SDSS shows it as knotty].  Surrounded by three mag 14-15 stars about 1' N, SW and SSE.  Located 20' E of mag 6.6 HD 218660.

 

CGCG 496-050 = IV Zw 134, a merged double system, is 20' NW.  It appeared fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, low nearly even surface brightness.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1473 = Sf. 58 on 1 Oct 1866 and remarked, "F, pS, F gbm."  His position is just off the southeast end of the galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1476 = MCG +05-54-051 = CGCG 496-060 = PGC 70764

23 14 16.3 +30 33 05; Peg

V = 14.1;  Size 0.8'x0.7'

 

24" (9/7/18): at 375x; faint, small, round, 25", low even surface brightness.  The view is somewhat confused by nearby faint stars; a mag 15/16 pair is at the NW edge of the halo and a mag 16 star is at the SW edge.  Located 42' SE of NGC 7512.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1476 = Sf. 59 on 1 Oct 1866 with a Clark 18.5-inch refractor and questioned if it was "a small cluster?" There is nothing at his position, but exactly 1 minute of RA preceding is CGCG 496-060 = PGC 70764.  Since he made similar digit errors in RA (e.g. IC 1026), this identification is nearly certain.

******************************

 

IC 1477 = NGC 7596 = MCG -01-59-011 = PGC 70932

23 17 12.0 -06 54 43; Aqr

V = 14.2;  Size 1.0'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 34°

 

17.5" (7/25/95): faint, small, round, 30" diameter, very weak concentration.  Located nearly at the midpoint of two mag 13.5 stars 1.1' W and 1.4' E.  Two similar star are also 1.3' S and 2.3' SE.  The PGC magnitude (B = 12.9) appears to be too bright.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1477 = J. 485 on 16 Sep 1892.  His position corresponds with PGC 70932.  This galaxy was discovered by Francis Leavenworth on 28 Sep 1886, though his rough RA is 1.5 minutes too small.  Harold Corwin checked Leavenworth's sketched and confirmed it matches PGC 70932.  So, IC 1477 = NGC 7596.  MCG uses the IC designation.

******************************

 

IC 1478 = NGC 7594 = UGC 12485 = MCG +02-59-023 = CGCG 431-037 = WBL 706-003 = PGC 70991

23 18 13.9 +10 17 54; Peg

V = 13.7;  Size 1.4'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.9;  PA = 30°

 

17.5" (11/18/95): faint, small, elongated 2:1 ~N-S, 0.8'x0.4', broad weak concentration.  The outer halo increases in size with averted vision.  Brightest in a quartet (WBL 706) with IC's 5305, 5306, 5307.  NGC 7594 is identified as IC 1478 in UGC, MCG, CGCG and RC3.

 

IC 5305 is faint, very small, round, 15" diameter, weak concentration.  Located 3.8' NNE of a mag 11.5 star and 1.9' W of NGC 7594.  Collinear with two mag 14 stars 45" SSW and 1.4' SSW.

IC 5306 is extremely faint and small, round, 15" diameter, low surface brightness.  Collinear with IC 5305 3.4' NNW and two mag 14 stars 2.0' NNW and 2.7' NNW.

IC 5307 is extremely faint and small, round, 15" diameter.  Faintest of four in NGC 7594 group and required averted to glimpse.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1478 = Big. 239 on 22 Aug 1889.  His position matches UGC 12485 = PGC 70991.  This galaxy was originally discovered by Common in August 1880, but his position (estimated using setting circles) is 6' too far southeast.  All modern galaxy catalogues (as well as HyperLeda) identify this galaxy as IC 1478.

******************************

 

IC 1479 = MCG -02-59-010 = PGC 71021

23 18 46.4 -10 23 57; Aqr

V = 13.6;  Size 1.0'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 18°

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, slightly brighter nucleus, 30" diameter halo increases with averted vision.  A mag 15 star is 1.2' E.  IC 5304 lies 8.5' NNE and difficult MCG -02-59-009 is 2' WSW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1479 = J. 1-486 on 13 Sep 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1481 = UGC 12505 = CGCG 406-064 = PGC 71070

23 19 25.1 +05 54 22; Psc

Size 0.8'x0.7'

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, fairly high surface brightness, 25" diameter, well concentrated with a very small bright core.  Situated 1.5' NW of mag 8.4 HD 219905, which detracts a bit from the view.  Also a mag 11.2 star is 2.4' ESE, with the galaxy forming the NW vertex of an isosceles right triangle with the stars.

 

Rudolph Spitaler discovered IC 1481 = Spitaler 34 on 9 Oct 1891 and reported "Very faint, round nebula of 1/4' diameter. Found on 9 October 1891.

******************************

 

IC 1483 = NGC 7638 = MCG +02-59-030 = CGCG 431-046 = PGC 71246

23 22 33.1 +11 19 44; Peg

V = 14.4;  Size 0.6'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.1

 

17.5" (9/7/96): very faint, small, round, 30" diameter, low even surface brightness.  Located 8' N of mag 8.3 SAO 108572.  A wide pair of mag 11/13 stars is 1.5' S.  First in faint group with IC 1484 and IC 1485 = NGC 7639 (uncertain ID).  IC 1484 is extremely faint and small, round.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1483 = J. 798 on 2 Dec 1893.  His position matches CGCG 431-046 = PGC 71246.  This galaxy was discovered by Andrew Ainslie Common in 1880 while viewing comet Faye and later catalgoued as NGC 7638.  Common didn't provide coordinates for this galaxy or NGC 7639, but it's like he picked up the two brightest in the area.  So IC 1483 = NGC 7638.  MCG and CGCG label these galaxies using the IC designation only.  See Harold Corwin's NGC/IC notes.

******************************

 

IC 1484 = LEDA 1392792

23 22 39.9 +11 23 04; Peg

V = 15.1;  Size 0.6'x0.3';  PA = 49°

 

17.5" (9/7/96): extremely faint and small, round.  Faintest in trio with IC 1483 and IC 1485 and requires averted vision and GSC finder chart to glimpse occasionally.  Located 2.1' WNW of brighter IC 1485.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1484 = J. 1-799, along with IC 1483 and 1485, on 2 Dec 1893.  The latter two galaxies are probably identical to Andrew Ainslie Common's NGC 7638 and NGC 7639, discovered earlier in 1880.  Common mentions two galaxies within 30' SE of NGC 7630 (#32 on his list).  MCG incorrectly identifies MCG +02-59-032 as IC 1484, although MCG +02-59-032 = IC 1485.

******************************

 

IC 1485 = NGC 7639 = MCG +02-59-032 = CGCG 431-050 = PGC 71256

23 22 48.2 +11 22 22; Peg

V = 14.6;  Size 0.6'x0.5';  PA = 123°

 

17.5" (9/7/96): very faint, small, round, 30" diameter.  Similar size as IC 1483 = NGC 7638 but contains a very small brighter core that makes it a little easier to view.  Just preceding a small triangle of mag 12-14.5 stars.  Also collinear with a wide pair 5' SW near IC 1483.  Brightest in a trio with IC 1484 2.1' WNW and IC 1483 4.5' SW.

 

The identification of IC 1483 is certain but NGC 7639 is uncertain.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1485 = J. 2-800, along with IC 1483 and 1484, on 2 Dec 1893.  His position is accurate.  This galaxy, along with IC 1484, were earlier discovered by Andrew Ainslie Common, while viewing comet Faye.  His position (for NGC 7639) was very roughly given, so Javelle assumed his observation was new. This gx is identified in CGCG (431-50) as IC 1485 and in MCG (+02-59-032) as IC 1484 (this is incorrect as IC 1484 is a fainter companion WNW).

******************************

 

IC 1486 = NGC 7648 = UGC 12575 = MCG +01-59-072 = CGCG 406-096 = Mrk 531 = LGG 473-015 = PGC 71321

23 23 54.0 +09 40 03; Peg

V = 13.0;  Size 1.6'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 85°

 

See observing notes for NGC 7648.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1486 = Big. 241 on 1 Oct 1885 and reported "mag 13.2-13.3, 25" diameter, without nucleus."  His position is 1' S of NGC 7648 and Corwin notes that he later equated B. 241 = NGC 7648.

******************************

 

IC 1487 = NGC 7649 = UGC 12579 = MCG +02-59-035 = CGCG 431-054 = PGC 71343

23 24 20.1 +14 38 49; Peg

V = 14.0;  Size 1.3'x0.9';  Surf Br = 14.1;  PA = 80°

 

See observing notes for NGC 7649.  Alternatively, it's possible that IC 1487 = CGCG 431-056.

 

IC 1487 = CGCG 431-056 = GIN 695 = PGC 95574

23 24 41.0 +14 37 56

V = 14.3;  Size 1.1'x0.7';  PA = 30°

 

18" (8/26/06): very faint, very small, round.  Nearly spans between a pair of 14th-magnitude stars 20" SSW and 30" E.  Second brightest galaxy of 8 viewed in AGC 2593.

 

17.5" (8/22/98): this member of AGC 2593 was not noticed initially as it is squeezed between two mag 13-14 stars within 30" to the south and to the E.  Appears as a very faint, unconcentrated glow just 15" in diameter.  Located 5' ESE of NGC 7649.

 

17.5" (7/19/90): very faint, extremely small, round.  A mag 14 star is just off the south edge 20" SSW of center and a second mag 14 star is 30" E of center.  Forms a pair with NGC 7649 5.1' WNW.  Second brightest of five in AGC 2593.  This galaxy is possibly IC 1487 (identified by Howe).

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1487 = Sw. IX-99 on 15 Oct 1887 and reported "eeeF; pS; R; 8m * f; F * nr. nf; not [GC] 4659."  His position is 1' NE of CGCG 431-056, the second brightest cluster in the core of Abell 2593.  But there is no "faint star near north-following", though there is one northwest.  Herbert Howe assumed CGCG 431-056 was IC 1487 in his survey of NGC/IC nebulae, though Corwin suggests that Swift more likely picked up NGC 7649, the brightest member, which he discovered the previous year, as NGC 7649 is a better fit with the description.

******************************

 

IC 1488 = LEDA 2800840

23 25 38.5 +15 21 16; Peg

V = 14.9;  Size 1.0'x0.2';  PA = 172°

 

24" (9/29/16): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, fairly small, very elongated 3:1 or 7:2 ~N-S, ~30"x9", contains a very small or stellar nucleus.  Located 12.8' ENE of NGC 7653.  Outlying member on the northern side of AGC 2593.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1488 = J. 2-801 on 2 Dec 1893 and recorded "extremely faint, very small, elongated in the meridian [north-south].  Very difficult."  In a note he added "distinct from NGC 7653 which was measured."  There is nothing at his computed position 3' N of NGC 7653.  Because NGC 7653 is the closest reasonably bright galaxy, MCG and PGC equated IC 1488 with NGC 7653 and UGC states IC 1488 = NGC 7653?  But Harold Corwin uncovered that Javelle misidentified his offset star, which was  BD +14 4986.  Once corrected his offset points to IC 1488 = LEDA 2800840.

******************************

 

IC 1490 = IC 1524 = MCG -01-01-011 = PGC 73151

23 59 10.7 -04 07 37; Psc

Size 1.7'x0.7';  PA = 84°

 

See observing notes for IC 1524.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1490 = Sw. X-52 on 5 Nov 1891 and recorded "eF; pS; R; vF * close N; 6 pB = Mag stars p[receding]."  There is nothing at his position, but Harold Corwin that Swift made an error of 30 minutes of RA (too small).  Once corrected, his RA is just 9 seconds west of IC 1524 = MCG -01-01-011 and the dec matches perfectly, as well as his description of the nearby stars.  This galaxy was discovered first by Truman Safford on 23 Sep 1867, though the discovery wasn't published until 1887.  See IC 1524 for more.

******************************

 

IC 1492 = MCG -01-59-028 = PGC 71629

23 30 36.1 -03 02 24; Psc

V = 13.1;  Size 1.3'x1.1';  PA = 32°

 

24" (11/24/14): moderately bright, fairly small, slightly elongated SSW-NNE, sharply concentrated with a bright 20" core and a thin very low surface brightness halo.  A mag 12 star lies 1' SSW.  Located 5.6' SE of mag 9.6 SAO 146743.  IC 1496 lies 7.7' NNE.

 

Edward Swift discovered IC 1492 = Sw. X-53 on 17 Oct 1891 and recorded "eF; S; R; sp of 2 [with NGC 1496]."  His position is accurate.  This was Edward's last deep-sky discovery age 20, though he discovered a comet (first observed in 1844) at Lowe Observatory in southern California in November 1894.  Parrish discovered IC 1496 the previous year.

******************************

 

IC 1496 = MCG -01-59-029 = PGC 71634

23 30 53.5 -02 56 03; Psc

V = 13.2;  Size 1.7'x1.3';  PA = 65°

 

24" (11/24/14): moderately bright, moderately large, slightly elongated ~E-W, fairly well concentrated with a bright 20" core.  The halo increases the size to 0.6'x0.5'.  Forms a pair with IC 1492 7.8' SSW.

 

N. M. Parrish discovered IC 1496 = LM(S) 863 = Sw. X-54 on 9 Oct 1890 with the 26-inch refractor at the Leander McCormick Observatory.  His micrometric position is accurate.  Edward Swift independently rediscovered this galaxy on 17 Oct 1891, along with IC 1492, and recorded "eeF, pS, R, nf of 2 [with IC 1492].  Swift is credited with the discovery in the IC.

******************************

 

IC 1498 = MCG -01-60-002 = PGC 71677.

23 31 53.6 -05 00 25; Aqr

V = 13.0;  Size 1.8'x0.6';  PA = 11°

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; moderately bright, moderately large, very elongated 3:1 ~N-S, 60"x20", slight brighter core, surface brightness somewhat irregular.  Located 14' ENE of mag 8 HD 221296.

 

24" (9/29/16): at 200x; fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, very elongated 5:2 N-S, 45"x18", brighter core.  Located 9.5' NE of mag 9.4 SAO 146750.  IC 5334 lies 50' NE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1498 = Sw. X-55 on 5 Nov 1891.  He reported "eeF; pS; R; 9 1/2 * p 36 sec, s 3' 15"; D[ouble] * s points to 11m * f[ollowing] neb 7 sec; another 11m * f neb 14 sec; not 7962 [NGC 7692]; seeing poor; could not find 7962."  His unusually detailed description describes the surrounding field very accurately and his position is also just off the northwest side of the galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1501 = MCG -01-60-009 = LGG 476-004 = PGC 71786

23 34 40.1 -03 09 10; Psc

V = 13.8;  Size 1.5'x0.65';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 134°

 

24" (9/22/17): at 260x; fairly faint, moderately large, elongated ~2:1 or 5:2 NW-SE, 1.0'x0.4', broad and weak concentration to a slightly brighter elongated core.  In a group with NGC 7700 12' N, NGC 7699 15' N and NGC 7701 18' N.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1501 = J. 1-494 on 19 Oct 1892.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1502 = UGC 12105 = UGC 12706 = MCG +12-01-001 = MCG +13-01-002 = CGCG 344-003 = CGCG 359-005 = PGC 71864

23 36 20.5 +75 38 53; Cep

V = 13.6;  Size 1.1'x0.4';  PA = 51°

 

24" (11/24/14): at 375x; moderately bright, fairly small, elongated 2:1 SW-NE, 30"x15".  Contains a sharp, bright stellar nucleus.  Bracketed by two mag 14.5 sars [30" E and 42" NW].

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1502 = Sw. X-56 on 15 Oct 1891 and recorded "vF; S; vF * close."  His position is accurate.

 

The UGC has two entries: The RA for UGC 12105 has a typo of 1 hour of RA too small, with the correct RA is listed under UGC 12706.  The dimensions and PA are slightly different, so it was measured twice on the POSS.  Also, this galaxiy lies in two different declination zones of the MCG (+12 and +13) and also in two different CGCG fields (344 and 359), so it has 6 entries in these 3 catalogues!

******************************

 

IC 1503 = UGC 12715 = KUG 2335+045 = MCG +01-60-016 = CGCG 407-031 = PGC 71982

23 38 27.0 +04 48 05; Psc

V = 14.4;  Size 0.9'x0.4';  PA = 68°

 

24" (9/7/18): at 260x; between fairly faint and moderately bright, elongated 2:1 WSW-ENE, slightly brighter along the major axis, ~45"x20".  An equal mag 12.5-13 pair of stars [~7" separation] is 3.5' S.

 

IC 1503 is near the east end of large group (USGC U850), which includes NGC 7696, 7704, 7705 and 7706.  CGCG 407-021, located 23' WNW, is faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 25"x20", low surface brightness, weak concentration.

MCG +01-60-011, located 18' WNW, faint, small, slightly elongated, 25"x20", low surface brightness. A mag 13.6 star is less than 1' SW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1503 = J. 1-495 on 9 Oct 1891. His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1504 = UGC 12734 = MCG +01-60-020 = CGCG 407-041 = PGC 72117

23 41 19.5 +04 01 03; Psc

V = 13.5;  Size 1.7'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 91°

 

24" (11/24/14): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 E-W, very weak concentration, 36"x15".  A mag 15 star is just off the south side [39" from center].  Picked up 17' NNW of NGC 7731.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1504 = J. 496 on 19 Aug 1892.  His published position is 2' too far north (error with offset star?).

******************************

 

IC 1505 = MCG -01-60-020 = PGC 72133

23 41 37.1 -03 33 54; Aqr

V = 13.5;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  PA = 156°

 

48" (11/2/13): at 488x appeared bright, moderately large, slightly elongated NNW-SSE, ~45"x35", sharply concentrated with a very bright core and bright stellar nucleus.  Forms the vertex of an isosceles triangle with the interacting pair (connected by a long tidal plume) Arp 295 = VV 34, consisting of MCG -01-60-021 6.7' SSE and MCG -01-60-022 6.7' SE.

 

17.5" (11/1/97): faint, small, round, 0.6' diameter.  Brightest of trio with the interacting pair Arp 295 = MCG -01-60-021 6.6' SSE and MCG -01-60-022 6.7' ESE.  Weak but even concentration to a small brighter core and a faint stellar nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1505 = Sw. X-57 on 12 Nov 1891 and recorded "eeeF, pS, R, 3 pB stars following and 4 or 5 stars preceding, ee dif."  His position is 13 seconds of time preceding MCG -01-60-020 = PGC 72133, but a good match in declination.  Herbert Howe provided an accurate position in 1888-89 (repeated in the IC 2 Notes).

******************************

 

IC 1507 = UGC 12770 = MCG +00-60-044 = CGCG 381-041 = PGC 72330

23 45 33.2 +01 41 19; Psc

V = 13.7;  Size 1.3'x0.45';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 130°

 

24" (9/7/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated nearly 3:1 NW-SE, ~40"x15", very small bright core, stellar nucleus.  Situated in a group of stars with mag 8.3 HD 223003 3.7' ESE.  An 8' string of stars extends to the NNE.  Located 53' E of mag 4.5 Lambda Piscium.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1507 = J. 1-498, along with IC 1510, on 5 Nov 1891. His position matches UGC 12770.

******************************

 

IC 1508 = UGC 12773 = MCG +02-60-016 = CGCG 432-028 = PGC 72345

23 45 55.1 +12 03 42; Peg

V = 13.3;  Size 2.0'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 168°

 

24" (12/1/16): moderately bright, moderately large, very elongated 3:1 NNW-SSE, broad concentration but no distinct core or nucleus.  The extensions have an irregular or uneven surface brightness.  A wide pair of mag 12.1/12.7 stars are off the north side.  This pair is nearly collinear with two additional mag 12/13 stars to the NE and SW, forming a 4' string.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1508 = J. 2-803 on 6 Dec 1893.  He called it "faint, elongated in the meridian [N-S], 1' in length, no condensation".

******************************

 

IC 1510 = MCG +00-60-053 = CGCG 381-053 = VV 641 = KUG 2347+017 = PGC 72589 = LEDA 1215207

23 50 32.8 +02 04 24; Psc

Size 0.7'x0.5'

 

24" (9/7/18): at 375x; very faint, very small, round, 20" diameter, very low even surface brightness.  IC 1510 is a double system, but I only noticed a single glow.  Located 13' SW of mag 7.0 HD 223617 and 27' ESE of mag 6.5 HD 223346.  A striking 30' linear string of stars begins 10' S of IC 1510 and extends NW to HD 223346.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1510 = J. 1-500, along with IC 1507, on 5 Nov 1891.  He called it "faint, almost round, appears to have two centers of condensation.  His description applies to this contact pair of galaxies though only a single IC designation was assigned.  The mean position (from NED) is given.

******************************

 

IC 1513 = UGC 12832 = MCG +02-60-024 = CGCG 432-039 = PGC 72773

23 53 29.4 +11 19 03; Peg

V = 14.0;  Size 1.0'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 106°

 

24" (1/1/16): at 375x; faint, fairly small, very elongated 3:1 WNW-ESE, 30"x10", low surface brightness.  Located 21' SE of NGC 7774 (double system).

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1513 = J. 2-804 on 28 Nov 1893 and recorded "F, vS, E in the diurnal movement [E-W], gradually condensed."  His position is accurate.  MCG failed to equate its entry +02-60-024 with IC 1513.

******************************

 

IC 1514 = NGC 7776 = MCG -02-60-022 = PGC 72812

23 54 16.6 -13 35 11; Aqr

V = 13.9;  Size 1.0'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.3;  PA = 153°

 

17.5" (10/21/95): faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 NNW-SSE, 1.0'x0.4'.  Weak concentration with a slightly brighter core.  Located 2.3' NE of a mag 10.6 star.  A mag 12.5 star is 1.3' SW between the galaxy and the brighter star.  Incorrectly listed as nonexistent in RNGC and identified as IC 1514 in MCG.

 

Johann Palisa found IC 1514 on 19 Sep 1893 with the 27" refractor at Vienna and noted "vF, 1/3' diameter, slightly eccentric nucleus."  His position matches MCG -02-60-022 = PGC 72812.  This galaxy was discovered by Ormond Stone on 31 Oct 1885 at Leander McCormick Observatory and reported in list I-270 (later NGC 7776).  Although there is nothing at his rough position (nearest min of RA), but Harold Corwin examined his field sketch and found it matches MCG -02-60-022.  So, IC 1514 = NGC 7776.

******************************

 

IC 1515 = UGC 12848 = MCG +00-01-004 = CGCG 382-002 = PGC 72922

23 56 03.9 -00 59 19; Psc

V = 13.5;  Size 1.0'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.2

 

24" (1/1/16): at 375x; faint, fairly small, oval 2:1 N-S, weak concentration, 30"x15".  A mag 12 star is just off the west side.  Forms a pair with IC 1516 4.4' NNE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1515 = Sw. X-58 on 12 Nov 1891 and recorded "eeeF, pS, 9.5m * inv, B * nf and pF * sp; sp of 2 [with IC 1516]; eee diff."  His position is just off the west side of the galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1516 = UGC 12852 = MCG +00-01-006 = CGCG 382-004 = PGC 72927

23 56 07.1 -00 54 59; Psc

V = 13.1;  Size 1.7'x1.6';  Surf Br = 14.1

 

24" (1/1/16): fairly faint or moderately bright, round, 0.6' diameter, broad concentration to a slightly brighter core.  Northern of a pair with IC 1515 4.4' SSW.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1516 = Sw. X-59 on 14 Nov 1889 while searching for Brooks' Comet with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  He noted "S, R, gbM, slightly cometary" and measured offsets of -0m 20.55s (mean of 5 measures) and +0' 53" from his comparison star, which is apparently mag 9 HD 224265.  IC 1516 is within a few arcseconds of these offsets.  He didn't publish the discovery, though, or notify Dreyer.

 

Lewis Swift independently discovered this galaxy on 12 Nov 1891 and described it as "vF, pS, R, B * sf, nf of 2 [with IC 1515]."  Swift was credited with the discovery in the IC.

******************************

 

IC 1517 = MCG +00-01-008 = CGCG 382-006 = PGC 72942

23 56 18.8 -00 18 20; Psc

V = 13.6;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  PA = 172°

 

24" (9/22/17): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 30" diameter, very small bright core, stellar nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1517 = Sw. X-60 on 12 Nov 1891 and reported "eeeF; very small; R; 3 st in a curve p[receding]."  His position is just off the west edge of CGCG 382-006 = PGC 72942 and the description matches.

******************************

 

IC 1518 = CGCG 433-006 = PGC 73011

23 57 06.1 +12 27 54; Peg

V = 14.9;  Size 0.5'x0.35';  PA = 65°

 

24" (12/21/16): at 282x; faint, very small, round, 12"-15" diameter, faint stellar nucleus.  Forms a close pair with IC 1519 0.7' SE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1518 = J. 2-805, along with IC 1519, on 6 Dec 1893.

******************************

 

IC 1519 = CGCG 433-005 = PGC 73010

23 57 08.4 +12 27 27; Peg

V = 14.8;  Size 0.55'x0.4';  PA = 135°

 

24" (12/21/16): at 282x; faint, very small, round, 12"-15" diameter, stellar nucleus.  IC 1519 is very slightly brighter and larger than IC 1518 0.7' NW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1519 = J. 2-806, along with IC 1518, on 6 Dec 1893.

******************************

 

IC 1520 = Arp 50 = VV 25 = MCG -02-01-007 = PGC 73057

23 57 54.8 -14 02 27; Cet

V = 13.8;  Size 0.7'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 165°

 

18" (10/29/11): at 283x, Arp 50 was easily visible as a faint to fairly faint, small, round glow, ~24" diameter.  The surface brightness is nearly even, though occasionally a slightly brighter stellar nucleus popped out.  Located 11' NW of mag 7.2 HD 224512.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1520 = J. 1-501 on 4 Nov 1891.  His micrometric position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1523 = IC 5368 = LEDA 3091908

23 59 06.6 +06 52 23; Psc

Size 0.3'x0.2';  PA = 5°

 

24" (9/8/18): at 375x; faint, very small, round, 15"-18" diameter.  Situated just 3' WNW of mag 4.0 Omega Piscium.  Once the overpowering star was placed outside the field, this faint galaxy was immediately  noticed, and although faint and small, it was not as difficult a target as expected.

 

Sherburne Burnham discovered IC 1523 on 19 Aug 1889, while checking if mag 4.0 Omega Psc was double using the 36-inch Lick refractor.  His offset of 164" west is a good match with this faint galaxy.  E.E. Barnard found the galaxy again (or perhaps he also observed it with Burnham) at Lick, probably with the 36-inch, and reported it directly to Dreyer.  His position matches the bright star.  As a result IC 1523 = IC 5368.  HyperLeda lists this galaxy as LEDA 3091908, but does not label it with either IC designation.

******************************

 

IC 1524 = IC 1490 = MCG -01-01-011 = PGC 73151

23 59 10.7 -04 07 37; Psc

Size 1.7'x0.7';  PA = 84°

 

24" (1/1/16): moderately bright and large, oval 5:3 WSW-ENE, 50"x30", faint elongated halo.  Contains a fairly bright, rounder core with either a stellar nucleus or a star superimposed near the center.  A mag 14 star is 40" N of center. [Note: The DSS shows a faint star close following the core].

 

Forms a pair with MCG -01-01-012 = PGC 73143 3.9' S.  The companion appeared faint, fairly small, very elongated 3:1 WSW-ENE.  A mag 14 star is 0.4' N of center and somewhat hides the galaxy.  Many sources misidentify this galaxy as IC 1524.

 

Truman Safford discovered IC 1524 = Sf 87 on 23 Sep 1867.  His published discovery list in 1887 is missing his description and there is nothing at his position.  But 20 seconds of RA west and 1.6' north is MCG -01-01-011 = PGC 73151, the brighter of a north-south pair of galaxies.  Lewis Swift independently found IC 1524 on 5 Nov 1891 and recorded Sw. X-52 (later IC 1490) as "eF; pS; R; vF * close N; 6 pB = Mag stars p[receding]."  There is nothing near Swift's position, but Harold Corwin found that Swift made an error of 30 minutes of time (too small) in recording his RA.  Once corrected, his RA is just 9 seconds too small and the dec matches perfectly, as well as his description of the nearby stars.  So, IC 1524 = IC 1490.  MCG, PGC, HyperLeda, WikiSky, etc. misidentify MCG -01-01-012, the fainter southern galaxy,, as IC 1524.  Jermain Porter measured an accurate micrometric position in 1908 using the 16-inch Clark refractor at the Cincinnati Observatory, correctly fingering the northern galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1525 = UGC 12883 = MCG +08-01-016 = PGC 73150

23 59 15.9 +46 53 20; And

V = 12.2;  Size 1.9'x1.4';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 20°

 

17.5" (7/17/93): fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated SW-NE, 1.0' diameter, broad mild concentration, very small brighter core.  Surprisingly bright for an IC galaxy.  Located 8' WSW of mag 7.3 SAO 53560.  Brightest of three with PGC 18 10' ENE and UGC 12888 6.5' E.  UGC 12889 lies 24' NNE.  PGC 18, just 1.7' NNE of the mag 7.3 star, appeared extremely faint, very small, round.  UGC 12888 was a challenging object and just glimpsed 4.2' SW of the bright star.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1525 = Sw. IX-100 on 19 Aug 1887 and logged "eF; pS; R; D * points to it."  His RA is 45 seconds too large and happens to fall closer to UGC 12888 = MCG +08-01-017 = PGC 73195, a much fainter galaxy. Swift very likely picked up the brightest of the 3 galaxies in the field.  MCG misidentifies MCG +08-01-017 as IC 1525, instead of +08-01-016.

******************************

 

IC 1528 = MCG -01-01-028 = PGC 312

00 05 05.4 -07 05 36; Cet

V = 12.8;  Size 2.2'x1.0';  PA = 73°

 

24" (9/29/16): at 200x; fairly faint to moderately bright, moderately large, oval ~5.:3 WSW-ENE, ~1.4'x.0.8', appears to have a brighter bar along the major axis.  The surface brightness is uneven awith subtle structure nd the periphery of the halo is not well defined.  Located 12' SE of mag 8.4 HD 225211.

 

Aaron Skinner, assistant to Truman Safford at the Dearborn Observatory, discovered IC 1528 = Sf 88 on 23 Sep 1867 with the 18.5-inch refractor. The position published in the Dearborn discovery list (published in 1887) is 1.5' S of MCG -01-01-028 = PGC 312 (accurate in RA) and the identification is certain.  Dreyer copied the position into the NGC appendix list, but he made an error of 4° in North Polar Distance in the IC position.  As a result MCG -01-01-028 is not identified as IC 1528 in PGC or HyperLeda.  The correct identification is given in NED and SIMBAD.

******************************

 

IC 1530 = NGC 7831 = UGC 60 = MCG +05-01-032 = CGCG 498-078 = CGCG 499-050 = LGG 001-005 = PGC 569

00 07 19.5 +32 36 34; And

V = 12.8;  Size 1.7'x0.4';  Surf Br = 12.3;  PA = 38°

 

17.5" (10/12/87): fairly faint, fairly small, very elongated SW-NE, weak concentration.  A mag 14 star is at the SW end 45" from center.  Located 2.2' NNW of mag 8.9 SAO 53654.  Identified in the UGC and CGCG as IC 1530.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1530 = Big. 357 on 7 Sep 1888 while searching for NGC 7831.  He couldn't locate NGC 7831 = UGC 60 at Swift's poor position so he assumed it was a new nebula.  CGCG, UGC, MCG label this galaxy as IC 1530 because of the unambiguous IC position, though Swift's number should apply by prior discovery.  For more, see Harold Corwin's identification notes and Malcolm Thomson's unpublished "Catalogue Corrections".

******************************

 

IC 1531 = ESO 349-035 = MCG -05-01-038 = PGC 684

00 09 35.6 -32 16 37; Scl

V = 12.5;  Size 1.8'x1.4';  PA = 138°

 

24" (9/7/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated 5:4 NW-SE, ~36"x28", increases to a small brighter core.  Two mag 10.5 stars are roughly 11' NE and mag 9.3 HD 521 (a very wide unequal pair) is 12' due N.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1531 = Sw. XII-1 on 24 May 1898, probably the last night he discovered new objects at Lowe Observatory. His position is 20 seconds of RA too far west, but accurate in RA and his description reads "vF, vS, R, unequal D * n."  This pair is 12' due north.

******************************

 

IC 1533

00 10 36 -07 24.9; Cet

 

= Not found, Corwin.  = MCG -01-01-44?? (description below).

24" (11/7/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, small bright core, sharp faint stellar nucleus.  A mag 9.8 star is 3.6' N.  This galaxy is located 20' N and 12 sec of RA west of Swift's position.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1533 = Sw. XII-2 on 24 May 1898 and recorded "eeeF, vS, R, bet 7.5m * n and 9m * s, eee dif."  There is nothing near his position, though MCG -01-01-044 is 20' N and 12 sec of RA west.  Although this galaxy is bright enough to be picked up by Swift, Corwin doesn't feel his description of the nearby stars is a good match and concludes the number is lost.

******************************

 

IC 1534 = UGC 125 = MCG +08-01-028 = CGCG 549-025 = V Zw 6 = WBL 005-001 = PGC 910

00 13 45.5 +48 09 04; And

V = 13.8;  Size 1.0'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 72°

 

17.5" (8/31/86): faint, very small, elongated WSW-ENE, even surface brightness.  A mag 11 star is off the NE edge 39" from the center.  First of three IC galaxies in the NGC 51 group of six galaxies with IC 1535 2.0' ENE and IC 1536 5.6' E.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1534, along with IC 1535 and 1536, on 6 Jul 1888 while sweeping with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  His notebook sketch (including NGC 48, 49 and 51) was reproduced in AN 4136.  He added a note that this discovery (and others in AN 4136) was put in an envelope and addressed to A.N. nine years ago, but for some unknown reason were never put in the mails.

 

Based on a 60-inch Mt. Wilson photograph, described by Pease (1920) as 20"x10", p.a. 65°, almost stellar nucleus.

 

******************************

 

IC 1535 = MCG +08-01-030 = CGCG 549-026 = WBL 005-002 = PGC 922

00 13 57.3 +48 09 29; And

V = 13.6;  Size 1.1'x0.2';  Surf Br = 11.7;  PA = 170°

 

17.5" (8/31/86): faint, small, elongated ~N-S, even surface brightness, very diffuse.  A mag 11 star is 1.5' W.  Second of three IC galaxies in the NGC 51 group with IC 1534 2.0' WSW.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1535, along with IC 1534 and 1536 on 6 Jul 1888 while sweeping with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  See IC 1534 for more.

 

Based on a 60-inch Mt. Wilson photograph, described by Pease (1920) as "Spiral, 45"x15", p.a. 168°, gbM, very small almost stellar nucleus."

******************************

 

IC 1536 = MCG +08-01-032 = CGCG 549-028 = Mrk 939 = WBL 005-004 = PGC 949

00 14 19.0 +48 08 36; And

V = 14.3;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 171°

 

17.5" (8/31/86): fourth of six in the NGC 51 group and the third of three IC galaxies with IC 1535 3.7' WNW and IC 1534 5.6' W.  Very faint, very small, slightly elongated, faint stellar nucleus.  A group of four mag 12 -13 stars is just north with the closest star 47" NW of center.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1536, along with IC 1534 and 1535 on 6 Jul 1888 while sweeping with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  See IC 1534 for more.

 

Based on a 60-inch Mt. Wilson photograph, described by Pease (1920) as "9" diameter with amost stellar nucleus."

******************************

 

IC 1537 = NGC 55E = ESO 293-050 = MCG -07-01-013 = PGC 1014

00 15 49 -39 15 36; Scl

V = 7.9;  Size 32.4'x5.6';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 108°

 

30" (11/4/10 - Coonabarabran): IC 1537 is the low surface brightness eastern portion of NGC 55.  The following notes only refer to this portion of the galaxy: Continuing further ESE (from the central section), the surface brightness drops significantly very quickly and a large, elongated dark wedge appears to take a bite out of the galaxy.  Just as the galaxy begins to brighten again towards the ESE end, there is another bright round knot and a second very small piece just detached to the ENE.  At the ESE tip the galaxy brightens a bit more and has an irregular, patchy appearance with a couple of brighter stars superimposed.

 

17.5" (11/1/86): the eastern portion appears tilted at a slight angle to the main western portion. 

 

13.1" (11/5/83): the very faint eastern portion is near detached from the bright WNW section.

 

8" (9/25/81): very large, very elongated, brighter to the west, very faint eastern section.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1537 = Sw. XI-2 on 23 Sep 1897 and reported "eeeF; vL; eE; close f NGC 55; f of 2 [with NGC 55]."  He included a long note at the end of his discovery list: "This with its associated companion is a remarkable nebula.  I am undecided as to whether it is all one, or consisting of two, the preceding half very very bright, very larg, exceedingly elongated as Sir John Herschel describes it, and the following half exceedingly exceedingly faint, very large, exceedingly elongated, partly overlapping the other.  If single it is curved, if double are inclined to each other.  I am included to think they are two distinct nebulae, one reason being that the brighter ends sharply, which would be improbably if the brighter merged into the fainter.  The brighter was discovered by Dunlop, but he could not have seen the fainter.  As Sir John Herschel does not mention with a sign as being a remarkable object, lends plausibility to the idea that it was not seen even by him."

 

But Dunlop's size estimate of 25' includes the faint eastern portion and John Herschel's sketch of NGC 55 clearly shows the fainter eastern section!  Corwin's position is centered on the brightest portion of the eastern half.

******************************

 

IC 1539 = NGC 70 = Arp 113 = VV 166a = Holm 6c = UGC 174 = MCG +05-01-067 = CGCG 499-108 = WBL 007-010 = PGC 1194

00 18 22.6 +30 04 47; And

V = 13.5;  Size 1.4'x1.2';  Surf Br = 13.9;  PA = 0°

 

See observing notes for NGC 70.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1539 = Big IX-359 on 19 Dec 1897 while searching for NGC 70.  He misidentified a star as NGC 70 and reported Big. 359 (later IC 1539) as new.  His positon in CR for 6 May 1901 is at the northeast edge of NGC 70.

******************************

 

IC 1542 = MCG +04-02-001 = CGCG 479-001 = WBL 009-001 = PGC 1328

00 20 41.2 +22 35 33; And

V = 14.1;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 78°

 

18" (11/22/08): faint, small, irregularly round, low surface brightness.  Located on the NW edge of the NGC 80 cluster.  Forms a pair with 2MASX J00203547+2234376 located 1.7' SW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1542 = J. 3-810 on 20 Nov 1897.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1546 = NGC 85B = MCG +04-02-008 = CGCG 479-010 = WBL 009-006 = PGC 1382

00 21 29.0 +22 30 21; And

V = 14.6;  Size 0.9'x0.2';  Surf Br = 12.6

 

18" (11/22/08): very faint, small, elongated 3:1 NW-SE, 0.45'x0.15'.  Forms the fainter member of a close double system with NGC 85 just 0.9' NW of center and the major axis of the galaxy points to NGC 85.

 

17.5" (9/19/87): extremely faint, very small, elongated NW-SE, visible with averted vision only.  Forms a double system just 1' E of NGC 85 in the NGC 80 group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1546 = J. 3-814 on 20 Nov 1897 and measured an accurate position.  Harold Corwin suggests dropping the use of designation NGC 85B for this galaxy since the IC 1546 identification is certain.

******************************

 

IC 1549 = UGC 218 = MCG +01-02-005 = CGCG 409-008 = PGC 1464

00 22 49.8 +06 57 51; Psc

V = 13.7;  Size 1.0'x1.0'

 

24" (9/8/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 45" diameter, gradually increased to a  very small brighter nucleus.  A mag 14.7 star is 1.2' ESE and a mag 8.5 star is 13' WNW.

 

CGCG 409-007, located 9' S, appeared faint, fairly small, very elongated 3:1 SW-NE, 45"x15".  Three mag 15 stars cradle the galaxy, all within 50" separation (S, N and W).

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1549 = Sw. XI-3 on 8 Dec 1895 and recorded "eeF, unequal D * f[ollows] 46 sec [on] same parallel."  His RA is 22 seconds too large, but once corrected a wide, unequal pair (or trio) matches his description.

******************************

 

IC 1553 = ESO 473-026 = MCG -04-02-017 = PGC 1977

00 32 40.1 -25 36 27; Scl

Size 1.2'x0.3';  PA = 15°

 

24" (10/6/18): at 260x; faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 SSW-NNE, ~0.7'x0.3'.  Fairly even, low surface brightness though the view was compromised by poor seeing and haze at its low elevation.  Two mag 13.5-14 stars 3.5' S and 8' S are collinear with the galaxy.

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1553 = D.S. 109 from a plate taken on 3 Nov 1898 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.  He reported "vF, vmE 10°", which matches this galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1554 = ESO 350-033 = AM 0030-323 = MCG -05-02-015 = PGC 2000

00 33 07.4 -32 15 30; Scl

V = 12.6;  Size 1.4'x0.8';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 25°

 

24" (10/6/18): at 260x; fairly faint, elongated ~5:3 SSW-NNE, contains a small bright core (round) with a halo of of ~35"x20".  The view was degraded due to thin clouds and its low elevation.  A mag 10.9 star lies 5.6' NW and a mag 8.1 star lies 12' ESE.

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1554 = D.S. 110 from a plate taken in 1899 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.  He reported "vF, vS, eE 170°, sbM", but there is nothing at his position.

 

Many sources including MCG, ESO, PGC, NGC 2000.0, HyperLEDA and SIMBAD identify ESO 350-033 as IC 1554, in fact as far back as the 1921 Helwan list of observations.  ESO 350-033 is situated 14' SSE of Stewart's position, which would be an exceptionally large error by Stewart.  Furthermore, although ESO 350-033 is elongated, the position angle is 25° (SSW-NNE), whereas Stewart reported an orientation of NNW-SSE (about 30° off from ESO 350-033). 

 

Wolfgang Steinicke lists the number as "not found" and Malcolm Thomson came to the same conclusion.

******************************

 

IC 1555 = ESO 410-021 = AM 0032-301 = MCG -05-02-019 = LGG 007-007 = PGC 2071

00 34 32.6 -30 01 04; Scl

V = 13.8;  Size 1.3'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 136°

 

24" (9/7/18): at 260x; very faint, small, round, 30" diameter, very low surface brightness (perhaps it was viewed through smoke haze at the low elevation).  A mag 14.8 star is at the SE edge [0.5' from center] and a mag 11.6 star is 1.8' W.  Member of the NGC 134 group (LGG 007)

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1555 = Sw. XII-3 on 22 May 1898 at Echo Mountain, during his last observing year.  He described it as "eeeF, S, R, wide D * close p point to it.  Not [NGC] 174."  Herbert Howe followed up on Swift's observation and noted "..the discoverer says that a "wide D * close p point to it." The magnitudes of the components of the double are 9.5 and 12, and by a rough sketch I judge their distance apart to be 1' or 2'.  The star of mag 9.5 precedes the nebula 8 seconds, 0.1' north.  A star of mag 13 is close to the nebula, south following."

******************************

 

IC 1556 = MCG -02-02-059 = PGC 2100

00 34 58.0 -09 20 32; Cet

V = 13.9;  Size 0.9'x0.75';  PA = 135°

 

24" (8/30/16): at 200x; faint to fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated NW-SE, 30"x25", contains a bright core than increases to the center.

 

MCG -02-02-059 forms a pair with fainter MCG -02-02-057 just 2' SE, which is identified as IC 1556 in NED.  MCG -02-02-057 appeared very faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 SW-NE, ~30"x15", slightly brighter core, low surface brightness.  A mag 15.5 star is 0.9' S of center. Although the IC identification is not certain due to a poor discovery position by Swift, MCG -02-02-059 is much more likely to be Swift's object.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1556 = Sw. XI-4 on 10 Sep 1895 and reported "eeeF; pS; R; ee diff[icult]".  There is nothing near his position and it was reported "Not shown" on plates taken at the Helwan Observatory in 1919-20.  HyperLeda doesn't assign IC 1556 to a galaxy and both Steinicke and Seligman lists the number as not found or lost.   But 12' due north is a pair of galaxies.  Assuming he picked up the much brighter galaxy, then IC 1556 = MCG -02-02-059 = PGC 2100.  NED identifies IC 1556 with fainter MCG -02-02-057.  See Corwin's notes for more on this number.

******************************

 

IC 1557 = MCG -01-02-037 = PGC 2130

00 35 34.5 -02 52 35; Cet

V = 14.4;  Size 0.7'x0.4';  PA = 135°

 

24" (10/6/18): at 260x; faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  Forms a pair with brighter and larger NGC 161 1.7' N.  A mag 12.5 star lies 1.2' W.  A mag 15.6 star is 40" S, in line with the two galaxies and a mag 12 star 1' N of NGC 161.

 

24" (11/24/14): faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  Situated 1.2' E of a mag 12.5 star and 1.7' S of brighter NGC 161.

 

Herbert Howe discovered IC 1557 = Ho III-1 on 6 Nov 1899 with the 20-inch refractor at the Chamberlin Observatory in Denver.  While observing and measuring  NGC 161 (discovered by Swift), he mentions "I noticed another nebula 2' south of 161."  In his list of new nebula (MNRAS 60, 611, 1900), Howe adds "eF, vS" and "attended by a star of mag 14, a trifle south, and by another, which follows the nebula closely."  Although his position is accurate, the MCG, PGC, RNGC, HyperLeda and Roger Sinnott's NGC 2000.0 incorrectly equate NGC 161 with IC 1557. The original error was likely made in the MCG.

******************************

 

IC 1558 = ESO 474-002 = MCG -04-02-024 = UGCA 8 = PGC 2142

00 35 47.1 -25 22 28; Scl

V = 12.2;  Size 3.4'x2.5';  Surf Br = 14.4;  PA = 150°

 

17.5" (9/7/96): extremely faint, fairly large, diffuse, very low surface brightness.  At times appeared elongated NNW-SSE, but it was very difficult to trace the outer halo due to its low surface brightness.  Required averted and was unable to hold the galaxy steadily.  Located 3.5' NE of mag 8 SAO 166387.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1558 = DS 111 on an Arequipa plate from 3 Nov 1898. He recorded "star north, possible spiral, E at 160°."

******************************

 

IC 1559 = NGC 169A = Arp 282 NED2 = MCG +04-02-034 = Mrk 341 = PGC 2201

00 36 52.3 +23 59 06; And

V = 14.0;  Size 0.8'x0.4';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 94°

 

24" (9/30/16): at 200x; fairly faint, small, slightly elongated, ~15"x12", faint stellar nucleus.  Forms the southern component of a disrupted, contact pair (Arp 282) with NGC 169 [21" between centers].  Located 3.8' SW of distracting mag 6.2 HD 3411!  NGC 160 lies 11' WSW.

 

13.1" (10/20/84): appears as a "faint star" possibly nebulous at the south edge of NGC 169, forming a close contact system (Arp 282).

 

R.J. Mitchell discovered IC 1559 = Big. 245 = J. 3-819 on 18 Sep 1857 using LdR's 72" and described NGC 169 as "S; d. neb; the n one is E, sp/nf; bM."  IC 1559 is the fainter southern component.  It was confirmed a month later on 22 Oct 1857 and reobserved by Lawrence Parsons in 1866.  Mitchell assumed his observation of a double nebula referred to NGC 160, though, with the second object catalogued later as GC 80.  But comparing the description to the field, it's clear that Mitchell was referring to NGC 169 and its close companion to the south.

 

Herman Schultz observed the field on 5 Sep 1867 (9.6" refractor) and also suspected NGC 169 to be double ("is probably S globular, and seems sometimes to be divided into two separate objects.").  In the 1880 publication Dreyer notes that Mitchell mistook his object for h32 = NGC 160, but the "double nebula" should apply to h82 = NGC 169.

 

Because of all the confusion Dreyer dropped GC 80 from the GC Supplement and added GC 5107 [= NGC 162] to a faint star east-northeast of NGC 160 that Schultz and Lawrence Parsons noted as nebulous.  As a result IC 1559 did not receive a NGC number despite being observed twice by Mitchell, later by Lawrence Parsons and even suspected by Schultz.  It was discovered again independently by Bigourdan on 7 Oct 1885 and by Javelle on 20 Nov 1897 and included in the IC as 1559.  Dreyer credited "LdR", along with Bigourdan and Javelle, with the discovery.

******************************

 

IC 1561 = ESO 474-008 = MCG -04-02-029 = AM 0036-243 NED01 = KTS 5A = PGC 2305

00 38 32.5 -24 20 24; Cet

V = 14.1;  Size 1.2'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 103°

 

24" (10/3/13): fairly faint, elongated 5:2 WNW-ESE, 45"x20", slightly brighter core region.  Forms a pair with IC 1562 4' N.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1561 = DS 112 on an Arequipa plate taken on 3 Nov 1898.  He recorded "star north, E at 105°."

******************************

 

IC 1562 = ESO 474-009 = MCG -04-02-030 = AM 0036-243 NED02 = KTS 5B = PGC 2308

00 38 34.0 -24 16 27; Cet

V = 12.8;  Size 1.6'x1.5';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 170°

 

24" (10/3/13): moderately bright and large, slightly elongated, ~1.2' diameter, broad concentration but no distinct core or nucleus.  A mag 13 star is 0.9' N of center, just off the north side.  Brightest in a triplet (KTS 5) with IC 1561 4.0' S and MCG -04-02-031 4.6' NE.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1562 = DS 113 on an Arequipa plate taken on 3 Nov 1898.  He recorded "S, R, psbM."

******************************

 

IC 1563 = NGC 191A = Arp 127 NED2 = Holm 13b = MCG -02-02-076 = PGC 2332

00 39 00.2 -09 00 52; Cet

V = 12.8;  Size 0.8'x0.6';  Surf Br = 11.9;  PA = 143°

 

17.5" (9/17/88): faint, very small, round.  A mag 14 star is 30" N.  Forms a double system with NGC 191 just 45" NNW of center.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1563 = Big. 362 on 16 Dec 1897.  He noted it was 0.6' in PA 160° (SSE) from NGC 191.  This galaxy is often referred to as NGC 191A, although that designation is unnecessary as the IC designation is certain.  In "Die Herschel-Nebel" (1926), Reinmuth noted, "pF vS neb ssf 1.0' [of NGC 191]"

******************************

 

IC 1565 = UGC 410 = MCG +01-02-047 = CGCG 409-057 = IC 1567: = PGC 2372

00 39 26.3 +06 44 03; Psc

V = 13.3;  Size 1.5'x1.5';  Surf Br = 14.1

 

18" (8/26/06): the brightest member of AGC 76 appeared fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 0.8'x0.7', very small bright core. The next two brightest cluster members are IC 1566 which lies 5' NE and IC 1568 10' NE. Several mag 10-11 stars are in the field, including a mag 10 star 3.4' SE.

 

17.5" (9/5/99): first of three in core of AGC 76.  Appears faint, small, round, 30" diameter.  Located 2.4' S of a mag 11.5 star and 3.4' NW of a mag 10.5 star.  IC 1566 lies 5.2' NE and IC 1568 is 10' NE.  NGC 190 (HCG 5) lies 20' NNW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1565 = J. 3-820, along with IC 1566, 1568, 1569 and 1570, on 24 Nov 1897.   Discovered by Javelle.  His micrometric position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1566 = MCG +01-02-048 = CGCG 409-058 = PGC 2373

00 39 33.3 +06 48 55; Psc

Size 0.6'x0.5'

 

18" (8/26/06): faint, small, round, 0.6' diameter.  Slightly smaller and fainter than IC 1565.  Located 5' NE of IC 1565 in AGC 76.

 

17.5" (9/5/99): second of three in AGC 76.  Very faint, small, round, 30" diameter.  Appears similar to IC 1565 but slightly lower surface brightness.  Located 3.0' NE of a mag 11.5 star and 5.2' NE of IC 1565.  IC 1568 lies 6.0' NE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1566 = J. 3-821 on 24 Nov 1897.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1568 = MCG +01-02-052 = CGCG 409-061 = PGC 2404

00 39 55.9 +06 50 55; Psc

Size 0.9'x0.9'

 

18" (8/26/06): faint, small, ~25"x15".  Third and faintest of three on a line with IC 1565 and IC 1566 in AGC 76.

 

17.5" (9/5/99): third of three in AGC 76 with IC 1565 and IC 1566.  Appears very faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 WNW-ESE, ~50"x35".  IC 1566 lies 6.0' SW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1568 = J. 3-822 on 24 Nov 1897.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1569 = MCG +01-02-053 = PGC 2430

00 40 28.0 +06 43 11; Psc

Size 0.7'x0.6'

 

18" (8/26/06): very faint, small, slightly elongated, 20"x16".  Located 2.7' SW of a mag 10.7 star and 15' dues east of IC 1565 in AGC 76.

 

17.5" (12/11/99): very faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  A mag 15-15.5 star lies 1.1' S of center.  Located 15' due east of IC 1565 in AGC 76.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1569 = J. 3-823, along with IC 1568, on 24 Nov 1897.  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1574 = UGCA 9 = ESO 474-018 = MCG -04-02-043 = DDO 226 = PGC 2578

00 43 03.8 -22 14 49; Cet

V = 13.7;  Size 2.0'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.9;  PA = 175°

 

18" (12/17/11): at 175x, an extremely or nearly very faint, low surface brightness glow was visible with averted vision.  Appeared fairly small, elongated N-S, ~25"x15".  Located 27' SW of mag 5.2 HD 4247.  This dwarf is a member of the Sculptor Group.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1562 = DS 115 on an Arequipa plate taken on 3 Nov 1898.  He recorded "vF, vmE at 0° [N-S], gbM."

******************************

 

IC 1575 = Arp 231 = VV 642 = MCG -01-03-002 = MCG -01-03-003 = PGC 2601 = PGC 2602

00 43 33.4 -04 07 04; Cet

V = 13.3;  Size 0.8'x0.7';  PA = 140°

 

24" (9/1/16): at 322x; fairly faint, fairly small, irregularly round, ~25" diameter.  A mag 13.3 star is 0.6' S.  At the northwest side is a brighter quasi-stellar knot or nucleus of IC 1575A.

 

On the DSS and SDSS, IC 1575 appears to be a post-merger system with a prominent curving dust slicing the galaxy from SW to NE and low surface brightness outer arcs or shells.  The NW portion of the system contains the bright nucleus and is listed in NED as IC 1575A = MCG -01-03-002 and the larger SE portion is IC 1575B = MCG -01-03-003.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1575 = Sw. XI-5 on 5 Sep 1896 and reported "eeF; S; R; 10m * close s[outh]; not [NGC] 239." His position is 1.8' too far south.

******************************

 

IC 1576 = ESO 474-020 = MCG -04-02-045 = PGC 2630

00 44 14.2 -25 06 33; Scl

Size 0.75'x0.45';  PA = 144°

 

24" (10/6/18): at 260x; IC 1576 is the southwestern of a 3.3' pair of faint galaxies with IC 1578.  It appeared extremely faint, very small, round, 20" diameter, low even surface brightness.  The galaxy is squeezed between two 14th magnitude stars oriented SW-NE, with both stars within 30" of the center of the galaxy.   The pair is situated just 45' WNW of the center of NGC 253!   The redshift is of IC 1576 is over twice that of IC 1578, so this is not a physical pair.

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1576 = D.S. 116 from a plate taken on 3 Nov 1898 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.

******************************

 

IC 1577 = IC 48 = MCG -01-03-001 = MCG -02-03-001 = PGC 2603

00 43 34.5 -08 11 11; Cet

V = 13.1;  Size 1.0'x0.8';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 171°

 

See observing notes for IC 48.

 

See IC 48.

******************************

 

IC 1578 = ESO 474-021 = MCG -04-03-001 = PGC 2637

00 44 25.9 -25 04 37; Scl

Size 0.8'x0.3';  PA = 18°

 

24" (10/6/18): at 260x; IC 1578 and IC 1576 are a similar pair of extremely faint galaxies oriented SW to NE and separated by 3.3'.  Both are very small, ~20" diameter, with a low surface brightness.  The pair is located just 45' WNW of the center of NGC 253!

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1578 = D.S. 117 from a plate taken on 3 Nov 1898 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.

******************************

 

IC 1579 = ESO 474-022 = MCG -05-03-002 = PGC 2667

00 45 32.5 -26 33 56; Scl

V = 14.2;  Size 0.9'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 6°

 

24" (10/6/18): at 260x; faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 N-S, ~30"x20", broad concentration with a slightly brighter core.  The galaxy is located 15' ESE of mag 7.8 HD 4208 and is in line with two mag 13 stars to the south [by 1.6' and 4.0'].  Even the elongation of the galaxy matches this line.

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1579 = D.S. 118 from a plate taken on 3 Nov 1898 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.

******************************

 

IC 1582 = ESO 474-024 = MCG -04-03-003 = PGC 2701

00 46 16.8 -24 16 46; Cet

Size 1.2'x0.3';  PA = 47°

 

24" (12/28/16): at 282x; very faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 SW-NE, 30"x12", low even surface brighness.  I couldn't hold the glow continuously but it was often visible with averted vision.  Located 10' SW of mag 7.5 HD 4507 and 4.7' E of a mag 11.0 star.  The galaxy forms the west vertex of a triangle with two mag 12.5-13 stars 2.5' E and 3' SE.

 

ESO 474-026, an unusual double-ringed galaxy, lies 13' SE.  It appeared fairly faint, fairly small, irregularly round, 25" diameter, very small bright nucleus with a stellar peak.  Located 9.5' SSE of mag 7.5 HD 4507.  This galaxy has two perpendicular rings -- both an equatorial ring and a polar ring surrounding a central nearly spherical galaxy (only the third component seen).  It is thought to have resulted from the major merger of two haloes with a 1:1 mass ratio.

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1582 = DS 120 on a plate taken 3 Nov 1898 at the Harvard station in Arequipa.  He described it as "eF, eS, pmE at 45°, * in M[iddle]."

******************************

 

IC 1583 = MCG +04-03-001 = CGCG 480-004 = PGC 2760

00 47 10.3 +23 04 26; And

V = 14.9;  Size 0.7'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 25°

 

24" (12/1/13): faint to fairly faint, very small, slightly elongated, 18"x15", contains a very small bright nucleus, high surface brightness.  First in a trio with slightly bright IC 1585 1.5' SE and MCG +04-03-003 2.6' SE.  Located 1.2° S of mag 4.1 Zeta And.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1583 = J. 3-826, along with IC 1585, on 23 Nov 1897.  His micrometric position is accurate.  MCG +04-03-001 is not identified as IC 1583 in the MCG..

******************************

 

IC 1585 = MCG +04-03-002 = CGCG 480-005 = PGC 2764

00 47 14.3 +23 03 13; And

V = 14.6;  Size 0.8'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 109°

 

24" (12/1/13): fairly faint, very small, round, 18" diameter, contains a very small very bright nucleus.  This compact galaxy has a very high surface brightness.  Second in a small triplet with IC 1583 1.5' NW and MCG +04-03-003 1.2' ESE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1585 = J. 3-827, along with IC 1583, on 23 Nov 1897.  His micrometric position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1590 = Cr 8

00 52 49 +56 37 54; Cas

Size 4'

 

18" (2/16/07): at 220x about three dozen stars are visible in the region of the nebula, including a number of faint stars.  At the center is the multiple star HD 5005 = Burnham 1, a striking triple with a difficult 4th component.  A close pair of mag 11.5 stars lie 0.9' SW of Burnham 1.

 

17.5" (9/28/02): IC 1590 is a young star cluster embedded in the core of NGC 281.  The bright central quadruple (ADS 719 = Burnham 1) contains a bright mag 8.6/9.2/9.8 trio at 4" and 9".  At 140x, a fourth fainter companion (mag ~10.1) at 1.54" separation is just visible close following the brightest member and is cleanly resolved at 324x.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1590 = Big 366 on 31 Oct 1899 and recorded "a large number of stars forming a very large cluster without concentration.  Seen in the region of NGC 281."  His position is 3' southeast of this group of stars centered on Burnham 1.

******************************

 

IC 1591 = NGC 276 = ESO 474-034 = MCG -04-03-021 = PGC 3054

00 52 06.5 -22 40 49; Cet

V = 14.9;  Size 1.0'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 90°

 

See observing notes for NGC 276.

 

Delisle Stewart found IC 1591 = D.S. 123 (= NGC 276) on a plate taken 3 Nov 1898 and reported "vF, vS, pmE at 95°, pmbM." This galaxy was discovered by Frank Muller in 1886 at the Leander McCormick Observatory but his typical rough position was 1.2 min too far west and Stewart assumed it was new.  Herbert Howe measured an accurate position for NGC 276 in 1899-00 using the 20" refractor at Chamberlin Observatory (repeated in the IC 2 notes), though Dreyer didn't realize the equivalence with IC 1591.

******************************

 

IC 1599 = ESO 474-042 = MCG -04-03-030 = PGC 3210

00 54 32.8 -23 29 42; Cet

Size 1.1'x0.25';  PA = 107°

 

48" (11/2/13): moderately bright and large, thin edge-on 5:1 WNW-ESE, 1.0'x0.2', slightly brighter core.  Picked up while viewing the HCG 9 quartet which lies ~5' SW.  PGC 133684 lies 2.9' SE.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1599 = DS 127 on an Arequipa plate taken on 3 Nov 1898.  He recorded "vF, vS, pmE at 100° [ESE]."

******************************

 

IC 1602 = MCG -02-03-047 = PGC 3306

00 55 51.9 -09 59 08; Cet

V = 13.7;  Size 0.8'x0.7';  PA = 174°

 

24" (12/21/16): at 282x; fairly faint, small, round, 20" diameter, slightly brighter nucleus.  IC 1602 is the brightest member of AGC 117 (light travel time of 738 million years).  No others members were observed. Located 13' SW of NGC 309.

 

Herbert Howe discovered IC 1602 = Ho II- on 16 Dec 1898 while observing NGC 309.  He simply noted "vF, S, near NGC 309." and measured an accurate position.

******************************

 

IC 1608 = ESO 351-027 = MCG -06-03-013 = PGC 3549

00 59 24.4 -34 19 44; Scl

V = 12.7;  Size 2.0'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 171°

 

24" (10/6/18): at 260x; no worse than fairly faint and nearly moderately bright, elongated 3:2 or 5:3 N-S, ~50"x30", strong concentration with a brighter, round core.  Located 18' N of mag 7.7 HD 5825.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1608 = Sw. XI-8 on 3 Oct 1897 and reported "pB; pS; R; 2 st nf and 2 np."  His position is off by 2' (too far west). The identification is certain, though it's not clear what stars he was referring to.

******************************

 

IC 1610 = MCG -03-03-020 = PGC 3681

01 01 42.6 -15 34 04; Cet

V = 12.9;  Size 1.2'x1.2';  Surf Br = 13.2

 

24" (10/1/16): at 375x; fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, small bright nucleus, high surface brightness.  A mag 12.5 star is just off the north edge, only 30" from center.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1610 = Sw. XI-10 on 13 Dec 1895 and recorded "pF; pS; R; 9m * nearly in contact np [north-preceding]".  His position is 3' SSW of PGC 3681and his description clinches the identification.

******************************

 

IC 1611 = ESO 029-27 = DEM S 106 = Lindsay 61

00 59 48.7 -72 20 01; Tuc

V = 12.0;  Size 1.0'

 

30" (11/5/10 - Coonabarabran, 264x): IC 1611, IC 1612 and Kron 22 are a trio of clusters just 10' SE of NGC 346, the best emission nebula in the SMC and the general field is striking (Hodge Association 44).  IC 1611 is fairly bright, irregular shape, elongated SW to NE, ~1 diameter.  A couple of very faint stars were resolved at the edges, though this object appears to be primarily an emission nebula (DEM S 106).  A mag 12.5 star lies 1' NNE (blue supergiant RMC 16) and a mag 13 star is 1' ENE.  IC 1612 lies 2.4' SSE and Kron 22 4' SE.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1611 = DS 132 = D 26?, along with IC 1612, from a plate taken on 27 Nov 1900 at Harvard's Arequipa Station. James Dunlop probably discovered the pair of clusters on 2 Sep 1826 and described "a small double nebula; the following is very faint."  His position is just 5' S of the clusters.  John Herschel never verified Dunlop's D 26 and Stewart is credited with the discovery in the IC.

******************************

 

IC 1612 = ESO 029-028 = Lindsay 62 = Kron 41

01 00 00.3 -72 22 18; Tuc

V = 12.3;  Size 0.8'

 

30" (11/5/10 - Coonabarabran, 264x): Second of three clusters with IC 1611 2.4' NNW and Kron 42 2.5' E.  Fairly bright, irregular shape elongated SW-NE, ~1.2' diameter.  A half-dozen stars were resolved around the edges including two very close pairs!  Kron 42 appeared bright, very small knot, ~30" diameter.  Contains a very bright core and a small fainter halo.  A single mag 12.8 star stood out at the SW edge.

 

The background glow of the SMC is relatively bright in this region so the cluster is set over a background glow that seems to extend more noticeably to the W and SW.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1612 = DS 133 = D 26?, along with IC 1611, from a plate taken on 27 Nov 1900 at Harvard's Arequipa Station. James Dunlop probably discovered the pair of cluster visually on 2 Sep 1826 and described "a small double nebula; the following is very faint."  His position is just 5' S of the clusters.  John Herschel never verified Dunlop's D 26 and Stewart is credited with the discovery in the IC.

******************************

 

IC 1613 = UGC 668 = MCG +00-03-070 = Cetus system = PGC 3844

01 04 46.2 +02 07 04; Cet

V = 9.2;  Size 16.2'x14.5';  Surf Br = 15.0;  PA = 50°

 

48" (10/26/16): I spent a few minutes identifying OB associations in the patchy northeast section section of IC 1613. At 375x I was able to pinpoint a half-dozen faint or fairly faint "knots", generally 12"-15" in diameter within a 1.5' region.  The identifications below are from Paul Hodge's 1978 study "The structure and content of IC 1613" and the Borissova et al. 2004 paper "The catalogue of OB associations in IC 1613".

 

[H78] 10 = [BKG04] G7, the brightest patch, is on the west edge and seen as moderately bright, small, 12" diameter.  A star or stellar object is involved.  Close northeast and southeast are [H78] 13 = [BKG2004] G11 and [H78] 14 = [BKG2004] G14, both easily seen as fairly faint glows, ~15" diameter.  [H78] 17 = [BKG2004] G25 is very faint knot 1' E of [H78] 13 and [H78] 15 = [BKG2004] G15 was visible 30" S of [H78] 14.  [H78] 11 = [BKG2004] G10 was also easily seen as a 12" knot 1.5' N of [H78] 10.

 

18" (9/15/07): faint, very large, irregular glow, roughly elongated 4:3 SW-NE, ~8'x6'.  A mag 10.5 star is just at the west edge of the glow. A very small knot (HII region?) or core is faintly visible just 2' E or ENE of the mag 10.5 star.  There appears to be a very faint detached piece to the northeast about 7' from the mag 10.5 star.  Located ~12' S of  mag 7.2 HD 6375.

 

13.1" (12/22/84): faint, large, extremely diffuse.  This Local Group member appears as an irregular hazy region with a large brighter section to the NE and a fainter section to the SW.  No visible core.  Several brighter stars are in the field includes a star at the SW edge.  Located 46' N of 26 Ceti.

 

Max Wolf discovered IC 1613 on a plate taken with the Bruce 16-inch telescope in September 1906.  Wolf's position (given in 1885 coordinates) is ~10' south and 1.5 minutes of time preceding the galaxy.  As he used BD stars to measure positions, it's very possible the coordinates for the "densest part" are for 1855.  If so, his position is near the center of IC 1613!

 

William Baade first showed it was extragalactic in 1935 and a year later Hubble included it as a Local Group member.  The distance is ~2.4 million light years.

******************************

 

IC 1616 = ESO 412-004 = AM 0102-274 = MCG -05-03-022 = PGC 3846

01 04 56.2 -27 25 46; Scl

V = 12.6;  Size 1.6'x1.4';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 4°

 

24" (10/6/18): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, perhaps 45"x35" though outer portion of halo increases with averted.  Broad concentration with a slightly brighter core region.  This galaxy is just north of a 3' string of three mag 12 stars and it forms the northern vertex of an equilateral triangle with the two western stars in the sting.  Three fainter stars lie NW and NE with the galaxy nestled inside this group of stars.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1616 = Sw. XII-5 on 24 May 1897 (or 1898) and recorded "extremely faint, pS, close to 3 st like belt of Orion."  His position is 2.5' NW of ESO 412-004 and the three stars are off the south side.  Harold Corwin notes that although Swift listed 1897 as the year of the discovery in his 12th list, he includes 2 others found on 24 May 1898.  So assuming they were all found on the same night it is more likely this object was found in 1898.  If that's the case, this one of his last few discoveries.

******************************

 

IC 1619 = MCG +05-03-054 = CGCG 501-083 = PGC 3975

01 07 22.4 +33 04 02; Psc

V = 14.3;  Size 0.7'x0.55';  PA = 101°

 

24" (10/5/13): fairly faint, fairly small, round, 20" diameter, very slightly brighter nucleus.  Sandwiched between two mag 12.5/13 stars with a 1.4' separation and oriented SSW-NNE.  Picked up 13' WSW of the NGC 392/394/397 triplet.  UGC 692 lies 8' SSE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1619 = J. 3-832 on 28 Nov 1899 with the 30-inch refractor at the Nice Observatory.

******************************

 

IC 1622 = ESO 541-022 = MCG -03-04-001 = PGC 3997

01 07 36.7 -17 32 19; Cet

V = 13.7;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.4

 

24" (10/5/13): fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter.  Picked up 3.1' SW of IC 1623, a very close double system, also known as Arp 236 and VV 114.  365x revealed a broad concentration with a brighter nucleus.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1622 = Sw. XI-11, along with IC 1623, on 19 Nov 1897 and logged "vF; S; R; np of 2 [with IC 1623]."  His position is ~2' too far north-northwest, a similar error as IC 1623.  The IC description was corrected to read "sp of 2".

******************************

 

IC 1623 = Arp 236 = VV 11 = ESO 541-23 = PGC 4007 = PGC 4008

01 07 47.2 -17 30 25; Cet

Size 1.2'x0.9'

 

24" (10/5/13): Arp 236 = VV 114 is in Arp's category of "appearance of fission", though this contact pair is apparently undergoing a merger and the two nuclei are separated by only 15"!  IC 1623A, the brighter western component, appeared fairly bright, fairly small, round, 25" diameter, high surface brightness.  IC 1634B, attached on the east end, appeared as a fairly faint, small glow that not separately resolved, just a bulge or knot on the east end.  365x revealed a broad concentration with a brighter nucleus.  Research reveals the IC 1634B is optically obscured but very bright in the infrared indicating intense star formation.  IC 1622 lies 3.1' SW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1623 = Sw. XI-12, along with IC 1622, on 19 Nov 1897 and logged "B; cS; lE; sf of 2 [with IC 1622]."  His position is ~2.5' too far northwest, a similar error as IC 1622.  The IC description was corrected to read "nf of 2".

******************************

 

IC 1624 = ESO 051-017 = Kron 52 = Lindsay 76

01 05 20.9 -72 02 35; Tuc

V = 12.4;  Size 0.7'

 

18" (7/6/02 - Magellan Observatory, Australia): at 171x and UHC, this is the smaller of a pair of nebulous clusters with NGC 395.  It appeared about half the size of NGC 395, roughly 1' in diameter with a mottled appearance and no central condensation or resolution.  A mag 13 star is close west with a mag 11 star 2' W (supergiant SK 118).  A very small nebulous knot (SMC-N78C) was also noted ~2' SE. A large, scattered group of stars (OB-association) is superimposed on the field.  Located 9' E of NGC 371 and 3.5' SSE of NGC 395.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1624 = DS 137 from a plate taken on 27 Nov 1900 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.  He noted "vF, S, R."  Some catalogues give IC 1624 as the designation to the nebulosity only and the cluster associated with it is called Kron 52.  Here I have referred to IC 1624 as the name to the cluster, with Kron 52 being an alternate name.

******************************

 

IC 1625 = ESO 243-033 = AM 0105-471 = PGC 4001

01 07 42.6 -46 54 27; Phe

V = 12.0;  Size 1.7'x1.2';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 8°

 

30" (10/18/17 - OzSky): IC 1625 is the brightest galaxy at the center of AGC 2870 and is located just 20' SE of mag 3.3 Beta Phoenicis (4.1/4.2 pair currently at 0.6").  At 264x, IC 1625 appeared very bright, moderately large, slightly elongated N-S, ~1.25'x1.0'.  The galaxy has a high surface brightness with a very bright relatively large core!  Several of the nearby cluster members are described below.  AGC 2870 is part of the Phoenix Supercluster, along with AGC 2877, which is centered just 1.1° NNE.

 

LEDA 73621 (2.7' N): fairly faint (B = 15.2), round, 20" diameter, very easy.

ESO 243-032 (6' NW): fairly faint (B = 15.3), elongated 2:1 NNW-SSE, 30"x15".

IC 1630 (11' NE): fairly faint, elongated 5:2 WSW-ENE, 40" x15", even surface brightness. A mag 7 star is 6' NNE.

ESO 243-037 (12' SE): fairly faint, elongated 4:3 WNW-ESE, ~36"x27".

ESO 243-038 (13' SE): faint, elongated 3:2 WNW-ESE, 30"x20".

ESO 243-035 (15' SSE): fairly faint, elongated 3:2 NW-SE, 30"x20", bright nucleus. In small quartet.

ESO 243-031 (18' NNW): fairly faint, very elongated 7:2 NW-SE, ~40"x12", small bright core.

ESO 243-029 (20' NW): fairly faint, slightly elongated, small bright core.  A mag 13.5 star is at the SW side [25" from center].

ESO 243-027 (28' NW): faint, slightly elongated, 30"x25".  A mag 14.4 star is off the SW end [43" from center].

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1625 = D.S. 138 on a plate taken in 1899 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.  He noted "cF, vS, R, susp."

******************************

 

IC 1626 = ESO 029-030 = Lindsay 77

01 06 14.6 -73 17 51; Tuc

V = 13.8

 

30" (11/6/10 - Coonabarabran, 264x): fairly faint, fairly small, irregularly round, 45"x35", fairly even glow.  A couple of faint stars were resolved at the NW and SW edge.  Two mag 11.5 stars lie 4' SW and mag 10.6 HD 6932 lies 8' NE.  Hodge-Wright (HW) 52, a faint cluster, lies 5' NE.  In addition, IC 1644 lies 14' NE and Lindsay 86 is located 9' ENE.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1626 = DS 139 from a plate taken on 14 Dec 1903 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.  He noted "vF, cS, R."

******************************

 

IC 1627 = ESO 243-034 = 2MFGC 827 = PGC 4027

01 08 10.8 -46 05 39; Phe

V = 12.9;  Size 2.5'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 137°

 

25" (10/15/17 - OzSky): at 397x; excellent edge-on, fairly large, elongated 7:1 NW-SE, ~2.1'x0.3'.  Contains a brighter, very elongated core that is angled slightly differently than the extensions or perhaps the extensions are slightly warped [verified on the DSS!].  A mag 13 star is just east of the southeast flank.  The major axis is collinear with a mag 10.8 star 2.9' NW.  IC 1627 is the second or third brightest member of AGC 2877 (brightest is IC 1633, located 20' NE).

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1627 = D.S. 140 in 1899 on a plate taken at Harvard's Arequipa Station.  He reported it as "cF, S, veE at 135°, vcbM"

******************************

 

IC 1628 = ESO 412-007 = AM 0106-285 NED01 = MCG -05-03-027 = PGC 4075

01 08 47.5 -28 34 56; Scl

V = 12.5;  Size 1.3'x1.2';  Surf Br = 12.7

 

24" (10/6/18): at 260x; moderately bright, fairly small, round, 45" diameter, fairly high surface brightness, increases to very small brighter nucleus.

 

IC 1628 is the brighter of a close 1.25' pair with MCG -05-03-028, just beyond the halo to the southeast.  The companion appeared faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  It is too small for any internal details.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1628 = Sw. XII-6 on 12 Oct 1897 and wrote, "cB, pS, round, 3 8m st[ars] near."  His position matches ESO 412-007, though he apparently missed the companion.

******************************

 

IC 1630 = ESO 243-036 = AM 0106-470 = PGC 4036

01 08 16.8 -46 45 14; Phe

V = 14.3;  Size 1.3'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 65°

 

30" (10/18/17 - OzSky): at 264x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 WSW-ENE, 40" x15", even surface brightness.  This member of AGC 2870 is situated 11' NE of IC 1625 (brightest cluster member) and 6' SSW of mag 7.0 HD 6869.  It's also located 23' E of mag 3.3 Beta Phoenicis!

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1630 = D.S. 141 on a plate taken in 1899 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.  He noted "eeF, eS, E at 60°, susp."

******************************

 

IC 1631 = ESO 243-040 = AM 0106-464 = PGC 4068

01 08 44.9 -46 28 33; Phe

V = 13.3;  Size 0.9'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 82°

 

30" (10/18/17 - OzSky): at 264x; moderately bright, slightly elongated 5:4 E-W, ~40"x32", fairly even surface brightness.  Located 12' N of mag 7.0 HD 6869 and 31' NE of mag 3.3 Beta Phoenicis, between AGC 2870 and AGC 2877 (both members of the Phoenix Supercluster).

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1631 = D.S. 142 on a plate taken in 1899 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.  He noted "eF, S, R, susp."

******************************

 

IC 1633 = ESO 243-046 = PGC 4149

01 09 55.6 -45 55 52; Phe

V = 11.6;  Size 2.9'x2.4';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 120°

 

25" (10/15/17 - OzSky): at 244x and 397x; very bright, very large, slightly elongated ~E-W, at least 2'.0'x1.7', sharply concentrated with a faintish halo and a very bright core that gradually increased to a stellar nucleus.

 

IC 1633 is the brightest cD galaxy at the core of AGC 2877, a member of the Phoenix Supercluster.  Several nearby companions were easily seen in the field; a total of 17 galaxies were logged within 16' of IC 1633 using a 25" on 10/15/17 and the 30" on 10/18/17.  Still, I certainly could have viewed more if I had spent additional time.

 

James Dunlop discovered IC 1633 = D 437 = Sw. XI-13 on 5 Aug 1826 and recorded "an extremely faint small nebula; round, with a very minute bright point in the center."  Dunlop's position is 6.6' SW of ESO 243-046, but this is a typical error and there no other brighter nearby candidates.  Lewis Swift independently discovered this galaxy on 29 Sep 1897, assumed it was new, and logged Sw. XI-13 as "vF; S; R; no B* near; vF one following."  His declination was 2° too far north in his 4th Lowe list, but corrected in the large AN table.  Dreyer credited Swift and DeLisle Stewart (who measured the position on an Arequipa plate taken in 1899) with the discovery, but not Dunlop.

******************************

 

IC 1634 = UGC 740 = MCG +03-04-008 = CGCG 459-014 = PGC 4232

01 11 02.9 +17 39 45; Psc

Size 0.4'x0.4'

 

17.5" (11/26/94): very faint, very small, round, 15" diameter, very weak concentration.  Forms the north member of a similar double system with IC 1635 separation 40" between centers.  The halos are almost in contact.  A mag 14 star lies 50" W.  These are the brightest galaxies in the core of rich cluster AGC 154 which lies at a redshift of z = 0.067 (billion light years!)

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1634 = J. 3-836, along with IC 1635, on 23 Dec 1897 and recorded "F, R, 20" to 25", gbMN, granular."

******************************

 

IC 1635 = UGC 739 = MCG +03-04-009 = CGCG 459-013 = PGC 4231

01 11 03.5 +17 39 07; Psc

V = 14.8;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  PA = 148°

 

17.5" (11/26/94): very faint, very small, round, 15" diameter, very weak concentration.  Forms the south member of a similar double system with IC 1634 separation 40" between centers.  The halos are almost in contact.  A mag 14 star lies 1.1' NW.  These are the brightest galaxies in the core of rich cluster AGC 154.  The redshift-based distance (z = .061) is 900,000 - 1,000,000 light years!

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1635 = J. 3-837, along with IC 1634, on 23 Dec 1897 and recorded "F, R, 20" to 25", gbMN, granular."

******************************

 

IC 1636 = CGCG 501-125 = CGCG 502-001 = PGC 4280

01 11 37.5 +33 21 15; Psc

V = 14.4;  Size 0.5'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.3;  PA = 103°

 

24" (8/29/19): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25"-30" diameter, very small brighter core.  Forms a pair with IC 1638 9' E.  Located 15' NE of NGC 410.

 

18" (10/16/09): faint, small, round, 20" diameter, high surface brightness.  Located 15' NE of NGC 410 in a cluster.  IC 1638 lies 9' E.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1636 = J. 3-838, along with IC 1638, on 17 Oct 1903 and recorded "F, S, 15" to 20", gbMN."  CGCG incorrectly describes it as a double galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1637 = ESO 412-010 = AM 0108-304 = MCG -05-04-003 = PGC 4227

01 11 01.1 -30 26 19; Scl

V = 12.8;  Size 1.7'x1.3';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 90°

 

24" (11/7/18): at 200x; faint, moderately large, slightly elongated, 1' diameter, low surface brightness.  Very weak central brightening.  Located 14' SSE of NGC 418.  The contrast was poor during the observation due to low elevation of the galaxy and the nearby skyglow on the horizon.

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1637 = D.S. 144 on a plate taken in Arequipa in 1899.  His published position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1638 = MCG +05-03-082 = CGCG 501-129 = CGCG 502-005 = Ark 34 = PGC 4338

01 12 21.8 +33 21 52; Psc

V = 14.1;  Size 0.7'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.4

 

24" (8/29/19): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, ~30"x25", small brighter core, occasional faint stellar nucleus.  A mag 8.5 star (SAO 54517) is 8' E.  IC 1636 lies 9' W, with IC 1638 nearly at the midpoint.  Located 22' NE of NGC 410 in a group.

 

18" (10/16/09): fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter.  Appears as a high surface brightness knot.  IC 1636 lies 9' W. Located 8' W of a mag 8.5 star. Member of the NGC 410 group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1638 = J. 3-839, along with IC 1636, on 17 Oct 1903 and recorded "F, R, 15" to 20", gbMN, stellar ncl 13m, granular."

******************************

 

IC 1641 = ESO 051-22 = Kron 65 = Lindsay 87

01 09 25.1 -71 46 01; Tuc

V = 13.4;  Size 1.0'

 

18" (7/11/05 - Magellan Observatory, Australia): very faint, small, 30" diameter, low surface brightness and no hint of resolution.  Follows NGC 411 by 7' and forms the eastern vertex of an equilateral triangle with NGC 411 and a mag 8 star 6' SW.  Observation made through thin haze.

 

18" (7/6/02 - Magellan Observatory, Australia): this faint SMC cluster is located 7' following NGC 411.  At 228x it appeared as just a very faint knot, less than 1' diameter with a low surface brightness and no resolution.  Located 5.5' NE of mag 8.6 HD 7031.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1641 = D.S. 143 photographically on 27 Nov 1900 at Harvard's station in Arequipa, Peru.  He simply noted "eF, eS, R." IC 1641 has been misidentified as a very faint cluster (Hodge-Wright 62) just following NGC 422.  But in 2014 Harold Corwin found that NGC 422 is a duplicate observation of NGC 411 (see notes on NGC 422), so IC 1641 should apply to the cluster formerly known as NGC 422.  See Corwin's notes for more.

******************************

 

IC 1644 = SMC-N81 = ESO 029-035 = Lindsay 481 = HD 7113

01 09 13.1 -73 11 37; Tuc

Size 0.8'

 

30" (11/6/10 - Coonabarabran, 264x): very bright, small, compact high surface brightness HII region, 20" diameter, good response to a NPB filter.  Located 14' NE of IC 1626 and 20' WNW of NGC 456.  Mag 10.6 HD 6932 lies 7.7' W and a mag 10.3 star is 9' ENE with IC 1644 on the line connecting these stars. Within Hodge Association 60.

 

IC 1644 = SMC-N81 is classified as a HEB -- high excitation blob.  This object, along with N88A, are rare objects in the SMC exhibiting very high surface brightness, absolute magnitude and compactness.  It harbors one or more hot, massive, young stars that ionizes the nebula.

 

Williamina Fleming discovered IC 1644 = HN 83 in 1901 on photographic spectrum plates taken at the Arequipa station. It was included in a 1901 table "Objects having peculiar spectra" in ApJ, 14, 144-146.

******************************

 

IC 1648 = CGCG 501-131 = CGCG 502-007 = PGC 4417

01 13 42.1 +33 13 06; Psc

V = 14.4;  Size 0.6'x0.4';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 132°

 

18" (10/16/09): faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  Located 5.4' NE and 9' NE of two mag 7.5-8 stars and 34' ENE of the NGC 410 quartet (NGC 407/408/410/414) in the same larger group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1648 = J. 3-847 on 7 Dec 1899 and noted "F, R, 15" to 20", mag 14 ncl, granular."

******************************

 

IC 1651

01 13 27.6 +02 04 07; Cet

Size 0.6'

 

24" (1/1/19): at 375x; IC 1651 is a small trio of stars oriented N-S (shallow curve). The brightest is the middle star at mag 13.4. It's bracketed by 15.1 mag stars 14" N and 19" S.  The trio is situated 8' due W of NGC 435 and was easily resolved.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1651 = Big. 368 on 25 Nov 1897.  Harold Corwin translates his description as "Nebula 13.3-13.4 or 13.4, pretty stellar, difficult to see because of a star 13.1 situated at PA = 195 degrees, distance = 0.2 arcmin; now and then, it briefly seemed that the nebulosity surrounded this star 13.1, to which the measurements referred."  His position corresponds with three stars in a short string - there is no nebulosity - though technically his description refers to the brightest star.

******************************

 

IC 1653 = NGC 443 = UGC 796 = MCG +05-04-005 = CGCG 502-010 = PGC 4512

01 15 07.5 +33 22 38; Psc

V = 13.0;  Size 0.8'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.3

 

17.5" (9/19/87): fairly faint, small, round, bright core, stellar nucleus.  Located 20' NNW of NGC 447.  Identified as IC 1653 in the UGC and CGCG.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1653 = J. 3-849 on 17 Oct 1903 with the 30-inch refractor at the Nice Observatory.  His position matches NGC 443 = UGC 796.  This galaxy was discovered earlier by Heinrich d'Arrest with the 11-inch Fraunhofer refractor in Copenhagen but his position is 9' too far south.  His description, though, of a nearby faint star confirms this identification.   UGC, MCG (+05-04-005) and CGCG (502-010) use the unambiguous IC designation for this galaxy, instead of NGC 443.

******************************

 

IC 1655 = ESO 051-23 = Lindsay 90

01 11 54.4 -71 19 48; Tuc

V = 14.0

 

30" (11/6/10 - Coonabarabran, 264x): fairly faint, fairly small, soft round glow with an even surface brightness, 40" diameter.  Hodge-Wright (HW) 64 lies 5.5' W.  IC 1655 is located 19' NW of NGC 458.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1655 = D.S. 147 = D 59? on a photographic plate taken on 27 Nov 1900 at Harvard's station in Arequipa, Peru.  He simply noted "eF, vS, close cl."  James Dunlop possibly discovered the cluster on 6 Sep 1826 with his 9" reflector from Paramatta and noted "a very small faint nebula, about 10" diameter."  Dunlop's position from a single observation is 11' southeast of this cluster, about halfway to NGC 458, which may be Dunlop 60.  But based on my observation, I believe this cluster is too faint to have been seen by Dunlop.

******************************

 

IC 1656 = NGC 447 = UGC 804 = MCG +05-04-006 = CGCG 502-013 = PGC 4550

01 15 37.6 +33 04 04; Psc

V = 14.0;  Size 2.2'x2.2';  Surf Br = 15.5

 

See observing notes for NGC 447.

 

E.E. Barnard found IC 1656 visually on 25 Oct 1888 using the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  He noted the "nebula is s.p. comparison star [mag 6 HD 7578] and close n.p. a small star.  A 9 1/2m star is s.f. 3'+/- [should read n.f.], a 12m star is s.f. 1/4'."  His offset in RA from the bright star (~40 seconds of time) matches NGC 447, though his declination is 1.4' too far north (similar offset as IC 1661 = NGC 451).  He reported the discovery directly to Dreyer who recatalogued it as IC 1656.  So, NGC 447 = IC 1656. In Barnard's notebook, he later added the comment "This is NGC 447.  The star is wrongly located in NGC."  See NGC 443 = IC 1653 and NGC 451 = IC 1661 for more duplicate IC entries.

******************************

 

IC 1657 = IC 1663 = ESO 352-024 = MCG -06-03-030 = PGC 4440

01 14 06.9 -32 39 03; Scl

V = 12.4;  Size 2.3'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.5;  PA = 170°

 

17.5" (12/26/00): fairly faint, moderately large, very elongated 7:2 ~N-S, 1.8'x0.5', brighter core.  The ends appear to taper giving a narrow lens impression.  Two nearby faint companions off the NW and NE side were not seen.  This is a Seyfert galaxy.

 

17.5" (11/6/93): fairly faint, very elongated 4:1 NNW-SSE, 1.6'x0.4', nearly edge-on appearance, weak concentration.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1657 = Sw. XI-14 on 4 Sep 1897 and logged "eeF; S; eeE; a ray; no star nr."  His position is 19 seconds of time too large (4 arc minutes), but his description clinches the identification.  He discovered it again less than two months later on 30 Oct 1897 and assumed it was new, describing Sw. XI-15 (later IC 1663) as "eeF, vE 350°; 5 sts sf have distant companions."  His second position is very poor (2 min of time too large and 2° too far north), but his description matches the field and Harold Corwin equates IC 1657 = IC 1663.  See his identification notes.

******************************

 

IC 1658 = NGC 444 = UGC 810 = MCG +05-04-007 = CGCG 502-015 = PGC 4561

01 15 49.6 +31 04 50; Psc

V = 14.3;  Size 1.9'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.9;  PA = 157°

 

See observing notes for NGC 444.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1658 = J. 3-851 on 17 Oct 1903.  His position matches NGC 444 = UGC 810 = PGC 4561.  This galaxy was discovered earlier by R.J. Mitchell, LdR's assistant, on 26 Oct 1854 but the NGC position is 28 seconds of RA too small.  The identification is secure based on Mitchell's description and sketch.  So, IC 1658 = NGC 444, with discovery priority to Mitchell.

******************************

 

IC 1660 = ESO 051-024 = Lindsay 89

01 12 38.4 -71 45 41; Tuc

V = 13.5;  Size 1.0'

 

30" (11/6/10 - Coonabarabran, 264x): fairly faint, fairly small, round, 40" diameter.  A single brighter star is resolved along with a couple of extremely faint stars.  Several mag 12.5-13.5 stars are within 5', mostly on the south side. IC 1660 is located 8' SSW of mag 9.8 HD 7519, 17' SW of cluster NGC 458 and 22' due east of cluster NGC 411.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1660 = D.S. 148 on a photographic plate taken on 27 Nov 1900 at Harvard's station in Arequipa, Peru.  He noted "eF, vS, R, * N inv in neb, or vF *."  His position is accurate.  For some reason, this object is included in Sky & Telescope's "Pocket Sky Atlas", although it is much fainter than other unplotted objects.  It was described as "probably globular" in the 1935 Harvard Observatory Bulletin 899 based on Bruce plates at Arequipa.

******************************

 

IC 1661 = NGC 451 = MCG +05-04-011 = CGCG 502-019 = Mrk 976 = PGC 4594

01 16 12.4 +33 03 51; Psc

V = 13.9;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.5

 

See observing notes for NGC 451.

 

E.E. Barnard found IC 1661 on 25 Oct 1888 using the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  He noted it was 6 seconds of time preceding his comparison star (mag 6 HD 7578) and called it "vvF, S, R."  He sent the discovery directly to Dreyer though his declination was 1.2' too far north (similar error with IC 1656 = NGC 447).  Barnard later wrote in pen in his notebook that "This is NGC 451" [discovered by Édouard Stephan on 10 Nov 1881].  So IC 1661 = NGC 451.

******************************

 

IC 1662 = ESO 029-037 = Lindsay 92

01 12 33.4 -73 27 25; Tuc

V = 14.0;  Size 1.0'

 

30" (11/6/10 - Coonabarabran, 264x): fairly faint, small, slightly elongated, 36"x24", brighter core.  There was no resolution except for a single star on the west side. IC 1662 is located 3.7' WNW of a mag 10.9 star and 11' SW of the bright emission nebula NGC 456, which is the first of three striking clusters and nebulae with 460 and 465.  Lindsay 93, a fainter cluster, lies 1.5' SE.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1662 = D.S. 149 on a photographic plate taken on 27 Nov 1900 at Harvard's station in Arequipa, Peru.  He noted "vF, eS, neb or vS group of stars."  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1663 = IC 1657 = ESO 352-024 = MCG -06-03-030 = PGC 4440

01 14 06.9 -32 39 03; Scl

V = 12.4;  Size 2.3'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.5;  PA = 170°

 

See observing notes for IC 1657.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1663 = Sw. XI-15 on 30 Oct 1897 and reported it as "eeF, vE 350°; 5 sts sf have distant companions."  There is nothing near his position, but Corwin found a match with IC 1657, which is 2° south and 2 minutes of time west from his large 11th list in AN.  His description fits the galaxy and field perfectly. In Swift's earlier 5th discovery list at Lowe (puslished in AJ), the declination differs by 30', but was still 1.5° too far north.  These types of errors were common in Swift's last year in southern California.

******************************

 

IC 1667 = MCG -03-04-039 = PGC 4694

01 18 42.3 -17 03 01; Cet

V = 13.6;  Size 1.0'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 69°

 

18" (12/17/11): extremely faint, small, round, 20"-24" diameter, very low surface brightness.  Required averted vision to glimpse a few times, but confirmed.  The IC identification is uncertain due to a poor position by Swift.

 

18" (12/18/06): extremely faint, small, round, 0.4' diameter.  Appears as a very low surface brightness hazy spot without concentration.  Only visible intermittently with averted vision.  Located 4.8' W of brighter IC 93.  The B magnitude of 14.5 appears too bright (LEDA gives 15.3).

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1667 = Sw. XI-16 on 6 Oct 1896 and reported "eF, pS, R, no * near, 8m * in field nf".  There is nothing near his position.  MCG suggests MCG -03-4-039 = IC 1667.  This galaxy is 1 min of time east and 3.5' north of Swift's position, though there is a mag 8.4 star 11' ENE that would have been in Swift's field.  So, despite the poor position (more common in his later years) and no mention of IC 93 = IC 1671, which he "discovered" twice and lies only 5' ESE, MCG -03-4-039 is a reasonable candidate.

******************************

 

IC 1670 = VV 779 = MCG -03-04-040 = MCG -03-04-041 = PGC 4707 = PGC 4711

01 18 50.8 -16 48 10; Cet

 

18" (11/13/07): IC 1670 consists of a contact pair of spiral galaxies.  The brighter galaxy (IC 1670B) on the east side appeared fairly faint, fairly small.  At first glance I noticed a fairly high surface brightness knot ~20" in diameter but with careful viewing, faint extensions were seen oriented E-W, increasing the size to ~0.9'x0.3'.  The initial knot I noticed is the sharply concentrated core of the galaxy.  At the west edge is an attached companion, IC 1670A, just 1' between centers.  IC 1670A appeared very faint, very small, round, just 0.2' diameter.  Apparently I only viewed the core of this edge-on galaxy.  Located ~3' SW of a mag 11 star.  IC 93 lies 15' SSE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1670 = Sw. XI-17 on 18 Dec 1895 and recorded "vF; pS; lE; wide D * near nf; f[ollowing] of 2 [with IC 1671]."  There is nothing at his position, but 6' northwest is this double system.  His comment "f of 2" should read "preceding of 2", which is consistent with his RA order.

******************************

 

IC 1671 = IC 93 = MCG -03-04-043 = PGC 4724

01 19 02.3 -17 03 37; Cet

V = 13.2;  Size 1.3'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 170°

 

18" (11/13/07): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated at least 3:1 NNW-SSE, 0.7'x0.2', broad weak concentration.  The tips taper, though there is a strong impression of irregularities at the tips.  Forms a pair with much fainter IC 1667 4.8' W.  The IC 1670 pair lies 15' N.

 

18" (12/18/06): faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 NNW-SSE, 0.75'x0.3', weak concentration, slightly asymmetric appearance at the ends.  IC 1667 lies 4.8' W.  Located 11' W of mag 8.5 HD 8061.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1671 = Sw. XI-18 on 18 Dec 1895 and recorded it as "eeF; vS; R; p 7m * nf 47 s; p of 2."  There is nothing at his position, but IC 93 is 30 seconds of RA west and 2.3' N.  Furthermore, a mag 8.4 star is 47 seconds of RA following, so the equivalence is certain.  His comment "p[receding] of 2" should read "f[ollowing] of 2", consistent with his RA order.

******************************

 

IC 1672 = UGC 872 = MCG +05-04-024 = CGCG 502-036 = PGC 4848

01 20 38.2 +29 41 56; Psc

V = 13.0;  Size 1.3'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 139°

 

24" (10/1/16): moderately bright and large, oval 3:2 NW-SE, ~45"x30",well concentrated with a small bright core.  A mag 14.3 star is 50" ENE.  There was an impression of brighter regions to the northwest and southeast of the core.  Perhaps these are portions of arms or an inner ring.  Forms a pair with CGCG 502-035 (often identified as IC 96) 5' SSW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1672 = J. 3-857 on 6 Dec 1899.  His micrometric position matches UGC 872.  This galaxy was probably discovered earlier by Truman Safford on 1 Dec 1866 and reported as Sf. 69 (later IC 96) in the 1887 Dearborn Observatory discovery list.  Safford's position is poor and is equal distance from CGCG 502-035 and IC 1672.  See 96 for more.

******************************

 

IC 1673 = CGCG 502-038 = PGC 4855

01 20 46.3 +33 02 42; Psc

V = 14.1;  Size 0.5'x0.5'

 

24" (10/4/13): fairly faint, small, round 18" diameter, contains a bright core and very small halo.  Located 6' NE of a mag 9.8 star.  CGCG 502-044 lies 7' NE.  Situated on the SW side of the NGC 507 Group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1673 = J. 3-858 on 17 Nov 1903 and noted "F, R, mag 13 stellar ncl."

******************************

 

IC 1677 = MCG +05-04-025 = CGCG 502-042 = VV 600 = PGC 4891

01 21 07.1 +33 12 58; Psc

V = 15.2;  Size 1.0'x0.7';  PA = 129°

 

24" (10/4/13): extremely faint, small, round, 18" diameter, very low surface brightness with no core.  CGCG 502-043 lies 10' N and IC 1680 is 10' NE.  Member of the NGC 507 Group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1677 = J. 3-860 on 30 Nov 1899 and recorded "F, R, 30" to 40", mag 14 core."

******************************

 

IC 1679 = MCG +05-04-027 = CGCG 502-048 = WBL 038-002 = PGC 4944

01 21 44.6 +33 29 37; Psc

V = 14.7;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  PA = 50°

 

24" (10/4/13): very faint, very small, elongated 3:2 SW-NE, 20"x14".  Located 2.9' SW of NGC 483 in the NGC 507 Group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1679 = J. 3-862 on 2 Dec 1899 and logged "F, S, irr form, diffuse, weakly condensed."

******************************

 

IC 1680 = MCG +05-04-028 = CGCG 502-049 = WBL 038-003 = PGC 4956

01 21 51.2 +33 16 57; Psc

V = 14.3;  Size 0.7'x0.6';  PA = 103°

 

24" (10/4/13): faint to fairly faint, small, round, 15"-18" diameter.  Situated 1.5' N of a mag 9.8 star and 4' NW of mag 8.8 HD 8216.  IC 1682 lies  4.8' ESE.  Member of the NGC 507 Group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1680 = J. 3-863, along with IC 1682, on 29 Nov 1899 and noted "F, vS, 10" to 15", stellar nucl, mag 13.5 core, nebulous character certain."

******************************

 

IC 1682 = UGC 912 = MCG +05-04-032 = CGCG 502-053 = WBL 038-005 = PGC 4983

01 22 13.3 +33 15 37; Psc

V = 14.0;  Size 0.9''x0.4';  PA = 120°

 

24" (10/4/13): fairly faint, small, elongated 3:2 NW-SE, 24"x16", weak concentration.  Located 2.1' NE of mag 8.8 HD 8216.  IC 1680 lies 4.8' WNW.  Member of the NGC 507 Group and 18' due W of this galaxy.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1682 = J. 865, along with IC 1680, on 29 Nov 1899.  His declination is 2' too far south (correctly copied into the IC), but Harold Corwin found that Javelle applied the wrong sign to his north polar distance from his offset star. Once corrected, his position is excellent.

******************************

 

IC 1685 = LEDA 169771

01 23 06.6 +33 11 22; Psc

V = 15.3;  Size 0.4'x0.3'

 

24" (10/4/13): very faint, extremely small, round, 10" diameter.  This member of the NGC 507 Group is situated just 2.5' NE of NGC 494 and 4.6' WSW of NGC 504. 

 

17.5" (10/4/97): this very difficult object is located 2.5' NE of NGC 494 in a cluster.  Just glimpsed with averted vision at 280x and appeared as a 10" fleeting spot with no concentration.  A mag 14.5 star lies 45" SSE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1685 = J. 3-868, along with IC 1687, on 1 Dec 1899 and reported "F, R, 20" to 25", diffuse, weakly condensed."  The identification is not in doubt, though the galaxy wasn't catalogued in RC3, CGCG, PGC or MCG.  Megastar software shows it as anonymous.

******************************

 

IC 1686 = NGC 499 = UGC 926 = MCG +05-04-038 = CGCG 502-059 = LGG 024-002 = PGC 5060

01 23 11.5 +33 27 37; Psc

V = 12.2;  Size 1.6'x1.3';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 82°

 

See observing notes for NGC 499.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1686 = J. 3-869 on 1 Dec 1899 with the Nice Observatory 30" refractor.  His position is 1.7' S of NGC 499 (matches in RA) but this is a similar offset that he gave for IC 1684 and IC 1692.  This makes the equivalence NGC 499 = IC 1686 pretty certain, although Javelle claims he also measured NGC 499 so there is still some doubt on the equivalence.  William Herschel discovered this galaxy on 12 Sep 1784.

******************************

 

IC 1687 = MCG +05-04-039 = CGCG 502-061 = WBL 038-011 = PGC 5074

01 23 19.2 +33 16 40; Psc

V = 13.6;  Size 0.5'x0.3';  PA = 5°

 

24" (10/4/13): fairly faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  Located 1.6' SE of mag 7.6 HD 8347 and 4.5' WNW of NGC 507, the brightest member of the large group.  A mag 13.8 star is just 30" W.

 

17.5" (10/4/97): extremely faint and small, round, 10" diameter.  Required averted vision to view.  Located just 1.6' SE of mag 7.5 SAO 54647 within the NGC 507 Group.  A mag 14 star lies 30" preceding.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1687 = J. 3-870, along with IC 1685, on 1 Dec 1899 and noted "faint, round, 15", central core mag 14."  He worked his way through the NGC 507 cluster very thoroughly over several nights, picking up a number of faint galaxies.

******************************

 

IC 1690 = CGCG 502-071 = WBL 038-018 = LGG 026-030 = PGC 5110

01 23 49.6 +33 09 23; Psc

V = 13.9;  Size 0.5'x0.3';  PA = 130°

 

17.5" (10/4/97): extremely faint, very small, elongated 2:1 NW-SE, 20"x10".  Extended in the direction of a mag 12 star 1.5' SE.  Member of the NGC 507 Group and located 6.4' SSE of NGC 507.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1690 = J. 3-873 on 30 Nov 1899 and noted "faint, very small, round, 10" to 15", stellar ncl, mag 13.4 core.  His micrometric position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1691 = LEDA 169777

01 24 25.8 +33 24 25; Psc

V = 15.2;  Size 0.5'x0.3';  PA = 123°

 

24" (10/4/13): extremely to very faint, very small, round, 12" diameter.  Located 4.0' WSW of NGC 517 and 4.8' SW of NGC 515 on the eastern side of the NGC 507 Group.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1691 = J. 3-874 on 2 Dec 1899 and recorded "pF, nearly round, 20", no concentration."  His position is 2' too far south, which appears to be caused by a error in declination offset from his comparison star (same problem with IC 1684).

******************************

 

IC 1693 = I Zw 6 = ZH 32 = PGC 73940

01 24 02.4 -01 39 26; Cet

V = 15.3;  Size 0.6'x0.25';  PA = 162°

 

17.5" (9/19/87): extremely faint and small, round.  Forms a very close pair with a close double star, whose components are both mag 15.  Located 2.0' SE of CGCG 385-099.  Member of AGC 194.

 

Herbert Howe discovered IC 1693 = Ho III-2 on 1 Jan 1900 and recorded "eF, vS, possibly only a faint star."  His micrometric position matches PGC 73940, though  Harold Corwin remarks that "This pair of objects [a faint star is superimposed] has also been confused with the middle (brightest) galaxy in the line, CGCG 385-099."  HyperLeda does not equate PGC 73940 with IC 1693 (as of Sept '15).

******************************

 

IC 1695 = UGC 977 = MCG +01-04-055 = CGCG 411-054 = Shkh 40-1 = PGC 5245

01 25 07.7 +08 41 57; Psc

V = 14.0;  Size 0.7'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.1

 

48" (11/8/15): at 488x; bright, fairly small, slightly elongated, ~40" diameter, small very bright core.  A mag 15 star is embedded in the halo, just 10" NE of center.  A mag 13.5 star is 40" NW.

 

IC 1695 is the brightest member of Shakhbazian 40, which corresponds with the central region of AGC 193.  Nine additional galaxies ranging from V = 15.0 to V = 17.0 were visible in the 488x field: Shkh 40-14, 40-23, 40-29, 40-39, 40-43, 40-44, 40-56, 40-57, UGC 967.

 

18" (12/3/05): I forgot about my observation of IC 1695 two months ago and assumed it was part of the NGC 524 group.  But with a redshift of z = .048 compared to .008, this galaxy lies six times further away in the heart of AGC 193 and Shk 40!  At 225x it appeared faint to fairly faint, small, irregular round, slightly brighter core.  The core or a stellar knot seemed offset to one side (double galaxy).  A mag 12 star is less than 1' NW.  This description is quite similar to the one two months back.

 

18" (10/8/05): The brightest member of AGC 193 and Shakhbazian 40 appeared faint, small, irregularly round.  Situated just 43" SE of a mag 13 star.  In moments of better seeing this galaxy appeared double with an extremely faint knot or extension to the northeast of the core of the main galaxy.  The next day I checked the DSS and this observation matches the image!  This distant cluster has a redshift of z = .048 which corresponds to a distance of over 700 million light years.  The only other member seen was UGC 967, located 7.5' NW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1695 = Sw. XI-19 on 26 Nov 1897 and recorded "eF; pS; R; 10m * att p; * with distant companion sf, another np."  His position is 3' too far northwest, but other nearby galaxies are much fainter.  A 12th magnitude star is ~45" northwest; I assume this is the "10m * attached preceding." and another mag 12 star 3.7' south-following (with "distant companion" 1.6' to its south).

******************************

 

IC 1696 = UGC 973 = ZH 24 = MCG +00-04-122 = PGC 5231

01 24 52.3 -01 37 02; Cet

V = 13.6;  Size 0.9'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 10°

 

24" (11/7/18): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, high surface brightness, very small brighter nucleus. A mag 14.4 star is off the NW edge.  Located 3.3' SE of NGC 530.

 

17.5" (9/19/87): faint, very small, irregularly round, small bright core.  A mag 14 star is 34" NW of center.  Located 3' SE of NGC 530 in AGC 194.

 

Herbert Howe discovered IC 1696 = Ho III-3 on 19 Jan 1900 at the Chamberlin Observatory in Denver and recorded "eF, eS; [NGC] 530 is n.p."  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1698 = UGC 983 = MCG +02-04-040 = CGCG 436-045 = PGC 5261

01 25 22.1  +14 50 19; Psc

V = 14.0;  Size 1.3'x0.4';  PA = 117°

 

24" (12/1/13): moderately bright, fairly small, elongated 2:1 WNW-ESE, 0.6'x0.3', small bright core.  IC 107 = IC 1700 lies 1.6' NNE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1698 = J. 3-877 on 18 Jan 1896 and recorded "pB, irr form, 30" diameter, core of mag 14."  His position is accurate.  Harold Corwin suggests IC 1699 is probably a later duplicate observation with a typo in declination.  See his IC identifications.

******************************

 

IC 1700 = IC 107 = UGC 986 = MCG +02-04-041 = CGCG 436-047 = PGC 5271

01 25 24.7 +14 51 53; Psc

V = 13.3;  Size 1.2'x0.9';  PA = 6°

 

24" (12/1/13): moderately to fairly bright, small, round, 20", high surface brightness.  Gradually increases towards the center, then a sharp stellar nucleus.  A mag 14.5 star is at the southwest edge.  Brightest in a small trio with IC 1698 1.6' SSW and UGC 978 2.8' WNW.  IC 1704 lies 26' ESE.

 

See identification notes for IC 107

******************************

 

IC 1702 = UGC 1005 = MCG +03-04-036 = CGCG 459-051 = PGC 5321

01 25 56.3 +16 36 06; Psc

V = 13.5;  Size 1.2'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 172°

 

24" (9/8/18): faint to fairly faint, moderately large, slightly elongated N-S, 50"x40", very diffuse.  A mag 13 star is close off the north edge [45" from center].

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1702 = Sw. XI-20 on 12 Oct 1896 and reported "eeeF; pS; lE; bet 2 st in meridian; wide D * nf; ee diff."  His position is only 5 seconds of RA too far west and the description matches the field perfectly.

******************************

 

IC 1703 = NGC 557 = UGC 1016 = MCG +00-04-144 = PGC 5351

01 26 25.1 -01 38 20; Cet

V = 13.5;  Size 1.4'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 45°

 

17.5" (1/1/92): faint, small, round, broad concentration, halo gradually fades into background.  Located 4.5' WNW of mag 8.7 SAO 129302 and 20' SE of the core of AGC 194.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1703 = Big. 369 on 27 Oct 1897 while searching for NGC 557.  He couldn't find this object at Swift's position, which was 46 seconds of RA too large, so assumed it was new.  As a result, NGC 557 = IC 1703, with NGC 557 the primary designation.  UGC and CGCG label the galaxy as IC 1703 but RC3 identifies it as NGC 557.

******************************

 

IC 1704 = UGC 1027 = MCG +02-04-052 = CGCG 436-054 = PGC 5411

01 27 09.5 +14 46 35; Psc

V = 13.2;  Size 1.0'x0.75';  PA = 163°

 

24" (12/1/13): moderately bright, fairly small, elongated 3:2 ~N-S, ~42"x28", irregular surface brightness, increases to an elongated core.  There was a strong impression of structure due to mottling in the halo.  A mag 10.7 star lies 3' ENE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1704 = J. 3-881, along with IC 1698, 1700 and 1706, on 18 Jan 1896.  He described this nebula as "pB, 40" to 50" diameter, diffuse, irr form, weak and gradual concentration."  There is nothing at his position, but Harold Corwin and Malcolm Thomson note that Javelle misidentified his reference star for IC 1704 and 1706.  Once his offsets are applied to the correct star, there is an exact match.

 

Malcolm Thomson notes the CGCG, UGC and MCG all misidentify IC 1704 as IC 1706 (this is pointed out in the PGC), while having no listing for the correct IC 1706.  RC3, PGC, HyperLeda, NED and Corwin's lists have the correct identities and coordinates.

******************************

 

IC 1709 = NGC 568 = ESO 353-003 = MCG -06-04-037 = PGC 5468

01 27 57.0 -35 43 04; Scl

V = 12.6;  Size 2.2'x1.4';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 137°

 

See observing notes for NGC 568.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1709 = Sw. XI-21 on 4 Sep 1897 and recorded "eeF; pS R; v diff."  His position is 10 seconds of RA east and 2.8' south of NGC 568 = PGC 5468.  This galaxy was discovered by John Herschel on 29 Nov 1837.  The ESO, PGC and Deep Sky Field Guide (first edition) misidentify ESO 353-004, a much fainter galaxy 4.3' NE, as IC 1709.  As Swift makes no mention of NGC 568 in his description, it is much more likely he picked up this brighter galaxy.  See Corwin's notes.

******************************

 

IC 1710 = NGC 575 = UGC 1081 = MCG +03-04-051 = CGCG 459-072 = PGC 5634

01 30 46.7 +21 26 25; Psc

V = 12.8;  Size 1.7'x1.6';  Surf Br = 13.7

 

17.5" (11/30/91): faint, fairly small, round, 1.0' diameter, low almost even surface brightness, broad mild concentration, edges fade into background.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1710 = J. 3-888 on 18 Jan 1896.  His position matches UGC 1081 = PGC 5634.  This galaxy was discovered earlier by Stephan on 17 Oct 1876, but due to a transcription error by Dreyer, its NGC position is two degrees too far north.  So, NGC 575 = IC 1710.  CGCG, UGC and MCG use the IC designation based on position, although NGC 575 should apply based on historical discovery.  Karl Reinmuth, in his 1926 survey based on Heidelberg plates, noted the equivalence of NGC 575 with IC 1710.  See Corwin's notes.

******************************

 

IC 1712 = NGC 584 = MCG -01-04-060 = Holm 45b = LGG 027-001 = PGC 5663

01 31 20.7 -06 52 06; Cet

V = 10.5;  Size 4.2'x2.3';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 55°

 

See observing notes for NGC 584.

 

E.E. Barnard found IC 1712 on 10 Dec 1888 while observing his comet discovery C/1888 RI with the comet nearly occulting the galaxy!  He wrote in his notebook, "The comet's nucleus passed some 30" N of the nucleus of the nebula.  The comet is probably 5 times as bright as the nebula and is a great many times larger."  The discovery was reported directly to Dreyer, who catalogued it again as IC 1712, though Barnard's position is nearly identical to NGC 584.  Barnard later added the comment “NGC 584” in his notebook, obviously after getting around to checking the NGC, so he was aware of the equivalence but perhaps never passed this information along to Dreyer.

 

Based on a photograph taken between 1914-16 at the Helwan Observatory in Egypt, IC 1712 was misidentified as LEDA 1028168 in the 1921 observatory bulletin.  This galaxy is located 7' WNW of NGC 578 and too faint to have been picked up by Barnard with the 12-inch.

******************************

 

IC 1714 = NGC 594 = MCG -03-05-005 = PGC 5769

01 32 57.0 -16 32 08; Cet

V = 13.4;  Size 1.3'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 32°

 

See observing notes for NGC 594.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1714 = Sw. XII-7 on 20 Sep 1897 and reported "eeF, R, S, lE, 8m * n, e dif[ficult]."  There is nothing near his position (01 32 54 -13 30.0, for 2000) or even searching east or west several degrees.  But Harold Corwin suggests Swift may have made a 3 degree error in declination and IC 1714 = NGC 594.  This galaxy has a mag 9 star 9' N, which is consistent with Swift's description.  Considering his errors and poor positions near the end of his observing career, this identification is reasonable.

******************************

 

IC 1719 = ESO 353-027 = MCG -06-04-059 = PGC 6020

01 37 35.9 -33 55 27; Scl

V = 12.8;  Size 1.6'x1.2';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 174°

 

24" (11/7/18): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, very small bright core.  A mag 14.5 star is off the NE side [1.1' NE of center].  Located 30' SW of mag 6.5 HD 10216.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1719 = Sw. XI-22 on 4 Sep 1897 and reported "vF; S; R; eF * near n[orth]-f[ollowing]."  The IC description calls the nearby star "cF" or "considerably faint", probably from one of his earlier lists.  His position is 3.8' S too far south and this galaxy has a mag 10 star 7' NE, perhaps the mentioned star.

******************************

 

IC 1720 = ESO 413-019 = MCG -05-05-008 = PGC 6180

01 40 21.6 -28 54 46; Scl

V = 12.9;  Size 1.2'x0.9';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 164°

 

24" (11/7/18): at 260x; moderately bright, slightly elongated, 45"x35" NNW-SSE, broad concentration with a slightly brighter core region, no nucleus.  Two mag 14.5 stars are less than 2' S.  Located 15.7' NE of mag 7.4 HD 10209.

 

ESO 413-016, situated 14' NNW, appeared fairly faint, very elongated 3:1 NNW-SSE, 50"x15", even surface brightness.  A mag 15 star is 1' E.

 

Lewis Swift discovered = Sw. XI-23 on 30 Oct 1897 and reported "eeF; extremely small; R; B * in margin of field p]receding]."  The bright star is mag 7.4 HD 10209.

******************************

 

IC 1727 = VV 338a = Holm 46b = UGC 1249 = MCG +04-05-009 = KTG 8A = PGC 6574

01 47 30.0 +27 19 59; Tri

V = 11.5;  Size 6.9'x3.1';  Surf Br = 14.7;  PA = 150°

 

24" (12/28/13): fairly faint, very large, very elongated 3:1 NW-SE, low surface brightness, ~2.5'x0.8' though the outer halo fades into the background gradually so the dimensions are difficult to estimate.  Contains a slightly brighter "bar" that is extended 4:1 or 5:1 NW-SE, ~45"x10".  The halo is more extensive NW of this bar, so the appearance is asymmetric.  NGC 672 lies 8' NE.

 

17.5" (1/20/90): very faint, moderately large, elongated 2:1 NW-SE.  Very low surface brightness with no distinct edges or core.  Located 8' SW of NGC 672.

 

13.1" (11/5/83): very faint, moderately large, diffuse, ill-defined, elongated NNW-SSE, no central condensation.  Forms a pair with NGC 672 8' NE.

 

Isaac Roberts discovered IC 1727 photographically on 29 Nov 1896 with his 20" reflector from his Starfield Observatory in England.  He reported (AN 3429) "It is nearly as large as NGC 672 and distant from centre to centre 8' only; nucleus consists of 6 faint stellar condensations forming a straight line in the direction south following to north preceding and there are 6 or 7 very faint condensations of nebulosity near the preceding margin; 15th mag star on the north preceding margin and a 16th mag star at the south following end of the nucleus."  Roberts was very amazed that this galaxy was missed by WH, JH and at Birr Castle (7 observations of NGC 672) and he felt this object must have "come into the state of visibility during the past half century."

******************************

 

IC 1729 = ESO 477-004 = MCG -05-05-014 = PGC 6598

01 47 55.2 -26 53 32; For

V = 12.6;  Size 1.7'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 150°

 

18" (12/17/11): at 285x appeared moderately bright, fairly small, elongated 3:2 NNW-SSE, 30"x20".  Sharply concentrated with a very small, very bright core that increases to a stellar nucleus.  ESO 477-008 lies 24' SE.

 

18" (12/18/06): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 NNW-SSE, 0.6'x0.4', gradually increases to center.  This galaxy appears to have a high surface brightness as if I was viewing the core region only (verified on the DSS).  Located 9' SSE of mag 8.9 HD 11020 near the corner where Cetus, Fornax and Sculptor meet.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1729 = Sw. XI-24 on 8 Oct 1896 and noted "pB; eeS; almost stellar; in vacancy."  Using the 20-inch refractor at the Chamberlin Observatory in Denver, Howe measured an accurate position and noted, "this looks resolvable, and is equivalent in brightness to a star of mag 10-11.  It is very small."

******************************

 

IC 1730 = MCG +04-05-015a = CGCG 482-020 = PGC 6732

01 49 57.9 +22 00 44; Ari

V = 14.3;  Size 0.7'x0.5';  PA = 64°

 

18" (11/22/03): very faint, extremely small, round, 10" diameter.  Located 3.5' NE of NGC 680 and 1' SSE of a mag 12 star.  Member of the NGC 697 group (also called the NGC 691 group).

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1730 = J. 3-891 on  17 Jan 1896 and noted "F, nearly round, 20" to 25", gradually condensed."  His position is 2' too far north, which Malcolm Thomson notes is due to an error in the position of his BD reference star.

******************************

 

IC 1731 = UGC 1291 = MCG +04-05-018 = CGCG 482-021 = PGC 6756

01 50 12.4 +27 11 46; Tri

V = 13.3;  Size 1.5'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 140°

 

17.5" (12/11/99): very faint, fairly small.  Appears as a low surface brightness glow elongated 3:2 WNW-ESE.  IC 1731 is located 34' SE of NGC 672 and 5' N of Collinder (Cr) 21.

 

Cr 21, immediately to the south of IC 1731, is a distinctive 5' group of 10 brighter mag 8.5-12 stars, including ∑172, a mag 10 pair at 18" separation.  The brighter stars form a rough semicircle open to the east with five fainter stars bringing the total to ~15.  Visually, the collection appears similar to an asterism and Skiff reports that based on the color-magnitude diagram and proper motions, these stars are apparently unrelated.

 

Isaac Roberts discovered IC 1731 photographically on 29 Nov 1896 with his 20" reflector from his Starfield Observatory in England.  He described it (AN 3429) as "Faint; elongated south following to north preceding; faint stellar nucleus; probably a spiral; cluster of stars 9 to 15 mag on the south side 13" following the nucleus."

******************************

 

IC 1732 = UGC 1307 = MCG +06-05-016 = CGCG 522-021 = PGC 6805

01 50 47.9 +35 55 57; And

V = 13.9;  Size 1.5'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 62°

 

17.5" (9/19/87): faint, fairly small, edge-on WSW-ENE.  A mag 15 star is at the NE edge 18" from the center.  Located 5.3' N of mag 7.3 SAO 55026 in AGC 262.

 

13.1" (10/20/84): very faint, small, elongated WSW-ENE.  One or two extremely faint stars possibly involved.  Located between two stars mag 7 and 8.

 

Bigourdan discovered IC 1732 = Big. 248 on 6 Nov 1891.  He noted it was 40" to 50" in diameter with a condensation of 12".

******************************

 

IC 1733 = UGC 13101 = MCG +05-05-016 = CGCG 503-032 = PGC 6796

01 50 42.9 +33 04 56; Tri

V = 13.3;  Size 1.2'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 50°

 

24" (9/15/12): fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, slightly elongated, 0.7'x0.6', bright core.  Forms a close pair with IC 1735 1.9' ENE.  Brightest member of AGC 260 (8 members viewed).  A mag 10.8 star 2' N forms an equilateral triangle with IC 1733 and 1735.

 

17.5" (10/5/02): fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated, 0.8'x0.7, weak concentration.  Located 2.0' S of mag 10.8 SAO 55024.  This galaxy is the brightest in the galaxy cluster AGC 260.  Forms a pair with IC 1735 1.9' ENE (not seen).

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1733 = J. 3-892, along with IC 1735, on 13 Nov 1903 and noted "F, nearly round, 15" to 20", granular."

******************************

 

IC 1734 = ESO 353-048 = MCG -06-05-003 = PGC 6679

01 49 17.1 -32 44 33; For

V = 12.8;  Size 1.6'x1.3'

 

24" (11/7/18): at 260x; faint, fairly small, roundish, low surface brightness, 30" diameter.  The contrast was fairly poor at a low elevation and at the edge of a light dome just east.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1734 = Sw. XI-25 on 17 Nov 1897 and logged "eeF; pS; R; 2 faint st p[receding] point to it."  DeLisle Stewart also picked up this galaxy on an Arequipa plate in 1899 and described it as "F, S, E at 100°, cbM."

******************************

 

IC 1735 = MCG +05-05-018 = PGC 6803

01 50 51.7 +33 05 32; Tri

Size 0.7'x0.5';  PA = 168°

 

24" (9/15/12): fairly faint, small, elongated 3:2 NNW-SSE, 24"x18".  Forms a close pair with brighter IC 1733 1.9' WSW.  Located 2' SE of a mag 10.8 star on the west side of AGC 260.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1735 = J. 3-893, along with IC 1733, on 13 Nov 1903 and noted "a little fainter than the preceding [IC 1733], 15" to 20", granular."

******************************

 

IC 1738 = MCG -02-05-061 = LGG 033-004 = PGC 6832

01 51 07.9 -09 47 31; Cet

V = 14.5;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 80°

 

13.1" (12/22/84): faint, small, round.  Forms a pair with NGC 701 5.4' N.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1738 = Sw. XI-26 on 8 Dec 1895 and noted "eeF; vS; GC 418 [NGC 701] p."  His RA is 37 seconds too large and dec is 3' too far south, but this is the only candidate near NGC 701.  Herbert Howe measured an accurate micrometric position in 1899-00 at Denver, so the IC position is very good.

******************************

 

IC 1743 = NGC 716 = UGC 1351 = MCG +02-05-054 = CGCG 437-049 = PGC 6982

01 52 59.7 +12 42 30; Ari

V = 12.9;  Size 1.8'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 57°

 

17.5" (12/4/93): fairly faint, elongated 2:1 SW-NE, 1.5'x0.7', broad weak concentration but no nucleus.  Located 8' WNW of mag 7.5 SAO 92682.  Identified as IC 1743 in UGC, MCG and CGCG.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1743 = Big. 250 on 1 Jan 1892.  He noted "Could be NGC 716, which could not be found, but with a 20' error in declination."  His position corresponds with UGC 1351.  He was correct in assuming this object was NGC 716, though Swift's error was actually 40' in declination (too far south).  UGC, MCG and CGCG label this galaxy IC 1743 because of the positional match, although the earlier discovery by Swift suggests NGC 716 should be the primary designation.

******************************

 

IC 1744 = NGC 719 = UGC 1360 = MCG +03-05-026 = PGC 7019

01 53 38.8 +19 50 26; Ari

V = 13.2;  Size 1.4'x1.1';  Surf Br = 13.6;  PA = 150°

 

See observing notes for NGC 719.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1744 = J. 3-896 on 18 Jan 1896 with the 30" refractor at the Nice Observatory.  His position matches NGC 719 = UGC 1360.  Heinrich d'Arrest discovered this galaxy on 24 Nov 1861 but his single position is 13 sec of RA too large and Dreyer assumed J. 3-896 was new.  MCG labels this galaxy IC 1744 and UGC correctly equates NGC 719 = IC 1744.

 

 

******************************

 

IC 1747 = PK 130+1.1 = PN G130.2+01.3

01 57 35.8 +63 19 19; Cas

V = 12.0;  Size 13"

 

48" (10/27/16): at 610x; very bright, small, round, aqua (blue-green) color, 12" diameter.  The planetary is annular (though not a high contrast) with a darker center.  The rim is unevenly lit, slightly mottled, and brighter along the entire eastern side.

 

48" (10/23/11): at 375x appeared as a very bright, small, bluish planetary with an irregularly brighter rim, slightly fainter on the west side of the rim.  At 488x, this is a very interesting annular planetary with a relatively thick brighter rim that appears clumpy and a dark center.  The rim dims, though, on the west side, so the annularity is incomplete.  Overall the impression is a thick crescent spanning 270°.

 

18" (11/17/08): immediately picked up at 175x as a small bluish disc, ~12" diameter.  Situated within a distinctive 20' curving chain of stars that passes through much of the field.  Very good contrast gain using an OIII filter.  At 450x, the planetary is slightly elongated WNW-ESE, ~15"x12", and weakly annular.  At 800x it appeared irregularly brighter along the rim with a knotty structure, particularly along the northern half.  Located 30' SE of mag 3.4 Epsilon Cas.

 

13.1" (12/7/85): at 166x without a filter appeared moderately bright, very small, round, about 12" diameter.  Takes 360x but no structure is visible.  Surrounded by three mag 13 stars 0.8' N, 1.0' SW and 1.3' E of center.  Three collinear mag 11 stars oriented SSW-NNE begin 3' NE.  Located 30' SE of mag 3.3 Epsilon Cas.

 

8": just non-stellar at 125x.  Definite disk at 220x and possibly slightly elongated NW-SE.  Three mag 11 stars on a line are to the NE.

 

Williamina Fleming discovered IC 1747 = HN 103 in 1905 at Harvard College Observatory, while classifying stars by examining photographic objective-prism spectra.  A note in the 1905 Harvard College Observatory Circular No. 98 ("Stars Having Peculiar Spectra") reads "assumed to be the following and southern of two faint and difficult objects, which also appears somewhat hazy.  The spectrum consists of a bright band having wavelength of about 5000.  Therefore, this object has been assumed to be a gaseous nebula."

 

Based on Crossley photographs, Heber Curtis (1918) described, "central star about mag 14.  Nearly round disk 13" in diameter, with an indistinct ring effect, strongest in the north and south and fading out along an axis in pa 90° [E-W]."

******************************

 

IC 1751 = NGC 741 = VV 175a = UGC 1413 = MCG +01-06-003 = CGCG 413-008 = III Zw 38a = WBL 061-004 = PGC 7252

01 56 21.0 +05 37 44; Psc

V = 11.1;  Size 3.0'x2.9';  Surf Br = 13.5

 

See observing notes for NGC 741.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1751 = Sw. XI-28 on 26 Nov 1897 and reported, "pF; pS; R; 9m * near np."  His position is 6' northwest of NGC 741 and Dreyer assumed it was new.  Herbert Howe corrected Swift's position though didn't make the connection with NGC 741.  CGCG misidentifies CGCG 413-006 as IC 1751.  See Corwin's notes for more.

******************************

 

IC 1753 = MCG +05-05-033 = CGCG 503-061 = Ark 68 = V Zw 149 = VI Zw 122 = PGC 7353

01 57 19.3 +28 35 21; Tri

V = 14.8;  Size 0.5'x0.4'

 

24" (11/21/19): at 322x and 375x; fairly faint, small, round, compact with a well defined 20" halo, moderately high surface brightness, slightly brighter nucleus. A mag 15.2 star is 30" SW and a slightly brighter mag 15.0 star 45" NW.  Located 10' NW of mag 7.1 HD 11962.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1753 = J. 3-901 on 17 Nov 1903.

******************************

 

IC 1756 = UGC 1429 = MCG +00-06-005 = CGCG 387-008 = PGC 7328

01 57 05.3 -00 28 06; Cet

V = 14.6;  Size 1.3'x0.2';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 153°

 

48" (10/27/19): at 375x and 542x; fairly faint, moderately large, thin edge-on ~7:1 NNW-SSE, ~1.0'x0.15', brighter core but no significant bulge. A mag 14 star is just off the eastern edge, 0.3' SE of center.  Two mag 13.7/15.5 stars close SW "point" to the SSE end of the galaxy.  Forms a non-physical pair with IC 1757 1.6' ESE.

 

24" (9/28/19): at 322x; very faint, fairly small, very elongated 4:1 NNW-SSE, ~40"x10", low even surface brightness, no core.  A mag 14 star is at the southeast edge and galaxy is a dim streak extending mostly NNW from the star.  A mag 13.7 star is 1.7' SW.

 

IC 1757, which lies far in the background at 1.1 billion l.y., lies 1.5' E.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1756, along with IC 1757.  The discovery date and telescope is unknown as he communicated the discovery directly to Dreyer, but he was probably observing with the Lick 36-inch refractor.  The MCG misidentified this galaxy (MCG +00-06-005 as being IC 1757.  The MCG error is mentioned in the UGC Notes to UGC 1429 = IC 1756.

******************************

 

IC 1757 = LEDA 174458

01 57 11.4 -00 28 26; Cet

V = 15.9;  Size 0.4'x0.2';  PA = 55°

 

48" (10/27/19): at 375x and 542x; fairly faint, small, round, 12" diameter, very small brighter nucleus.  Located 1.6' ESE of edge-on IC 1756, which lies in the foreground.  At a light-travel time of 1.1 billion years, IC 1757 is one of the most distant galaxies in the NGC/IC that was discovered visually.

 

24" (9/28/19): at 322x; extremely faint, very small, 10" diameter, low even surface brightness.  Required careful averted vision for extended glimpses, but could hold for up to 2 seconds.  Situated just 1.5' E of brighter IC 1756.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1757, along with IC 1756.  The discovery date and telescope is unknown as he communicated the discovery directly to Dreyer, but he was probably observing with the Lick 36-inch refractor.

******************************

 

IC 1759 = IC 1760 = ESO 354-018 = MCG -06-05-016 = PGC 7400

01 57 55.4 -32 59 13; For

V = 13.0;  Size 1.5'x1.4';  Surf Br = 13.7

 

24" (11/7/18): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 40" diameter, very weak concentration.  Located 8' NW of mag 6.4 HD 12135.  Fainter IC 1762 lies 15' S.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1759 = Sw. XI-29 on 29 Sep 1897 and reported "pB; vS; R; BM; 10m * v close sp."  His position is 6' too far southwest (RA 25 seconds too small) and the bright star is not southwest as stated, but southeast.  He found the galaxy again on 17 Nov but due to a transcription error the declination for Sw. XI-30 (later IC 1760) in his large 11th list in Astronomische Nachrichten is 1° too far north.  So IC 1760 = IC 1759

******************************

 

IC 1760 = IC 1759 = ESO 354-018 = MCG -06-05-016 = PGC 7400

01 57 55.4 -32 59 13; For

V = 13.0;  Size 1.5'x1.4';  Surf Br = 13.7

 

See observing notes for IC 1759.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1760 = Sw. XI-30 on 17 Nov 1897 and reported (11th discovery list), "eF; pS; R; Cordoba 681 sp."  There is nothing near his position but 1° south is IC 1759 (also discovered by Swift on 29 Sep 1897).  Corwin sorts out Swift's error and concludes IC 1760 = IC 1759.

******************************

 

IC 1761 = CGCG 387-019 = PGC 7484

01 58 52.2 +00 34 06; Cet

V = 14.2;  Size 0.9'x0.5';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 47°

 

24" (12/22/14): faint, small, round 12" diameter (only the core seen with certainty).  Located 3.7' NE of NGC 768 and 5.8' NW of mag 8.3 HD 12134.  A mag 14.5 star is 1.6' SW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1761 = J. 904 on 18 Dec 1897 and recorded "vF, vS, R, gbMN."  His position is 1' too far north.  Harold Corwin comments that "IC 1761 was not seen by Lewis Swift as some have suggested (see NGC 768 for that story)."

******************************

 

IC 1762 = ESO 354-017 = MCG -06-05-015 = PGC 7393

01 57 48.6 -33 14 23; For

V = 13.5;  Size 1.8'x0.4';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 43°

 

24" (12/6/18): at 260x; very faint, moderately large, very elongated 3:1 or 7:2 SW-NE, 0.9'x0.35'.  Appears as a ghostly streak (thicker in the middle) with averted vision and appears fainter than the listed magnitude.  Located 13' SW of mag 6.4 HD 12135.  IC 1759 lies 15' due north.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1762 = Sw. XI-31 on 6 Sep 1897 and called it "eeeF; pS; R; 7m * in field [north-following], another susp[ected]."  His position is 5' too far southeast (very common in his last year of observing) but a mag 6.4 star is 13' NE, confirming the identification.  Delisle Stewart found the galaxy again on an Arequipa plate in 1899 and described the galaxy as "cF, S, vE at 45°, cbM."

******************************

 

IC 1763 = ESO 414-020 = MCG -05-05-025 = PGC 7514

01 59 11.8 -27 48 38; For

Size 1.1'x0.9';  PA = 45°

 

24" (11/7/18): at 260x; very faint, fairly small, round, 25"-30" diameter, low surface brightness with little or no central brightening (like a face-on Sc spiral).  Situated 9' NNW of mag 8.3 HD 12225.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1763 = Sw. XII-8 on 10 Oct 1897 and reported it as "eeF, S, R, 8m * S[outh], lf."  His position is about 25 seconds of RA too far west (not unusual at all in last discovery list) and the 8th mag star 9' SSE clinches the identification.

******************************

 

IC 1765 = NGC 783 = UGC 1497 = MCG +05-05-042 = CGCG 503-073 = Mrk 1171 = PGC 7657

02 01 06.4 +31 52 57; Tri

V = 12.1;  Size 1.6'x1.4';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 35°

 

See observing notes for NGC 783.

 

E.E. Barnard found IC 1765 in the early 1890's at Lick Observatory and communicated the discovery directly to Dreyer.  Barnard's position is about 30 seconds of RA west and 2' S of NGC 783, so Dreyer must have thought it was a different object.  Most likely IC 1765 = NGC 783 (IC 1766 has a similar offset from NGC 785!).

******************************

 

IC 1766 = NGC 785 = UGC 1509 = MCG +05-05-046 = CGCG 503-076 = PGC 7694

02 01 40.0 +31 49 35; Tri

V = 13.2;  Size 1.5'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 80°

 

See observing notes for NGC 785.

 

E.E. Barnard found IC 1766 in the early 1890's at Lick Observatory and communicated the discovery directly to Dreyer.  Barnard's position is about 30 seconds of RA west and 3' S of NGC 785, so Dreyer must have thought it was a different object.  Almost certainly IC 1766 = NGC 785 as Barnard's IC 1765 has a similar offset from NGC 783!

******************************

 

IC 1767 = MCG -02-06-012 = PGC 7568

01 59 59.4 -11 04 44; Cet

Size 1.7'x0.6';  PA = 75°

 

24" (12/28/16): at 375x; fairly faint, moderately large, elongated 5:2 WSW-ENE, ~1.2'x.0.5', large brighter core, no nucleus.  The halo brightens slightly at the WSW edge - perhaps a knot in the galaxy?

 

I was pleased when I checked later and found the PanSTARRS-1 image clearly shows a small galaxy (identified as 2MASX J01595678-1104533 in NED) at the position I noted.  Although this galaxy appears to be superimposed, I don’t know whether the companion is actually at the same distance (no published redshift) or possibly in front of IC 1767.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1767 = Sw. XI-32 on 18 Dec 1895 and reported "eeF; pS; bet[ween] the 2 southern of 4 st in trapezium."  His position is ~2.5' too far south, but the identification is certain.  MCG -02-06-012 failed to recognize the IC identity.  The discovery year is given as 1895 in his first discovery list at Lowe, but as 1896 in large 11th list.  As other nebulae share the 1895 date, it is more likely correct.

******************************

 

IC 1768 = ESO 477- 021 = MCG -04-05-026 = PGC 7636

02 00 49.9 -25 01 36; For

Size 1.3'x1.1';  PA = 47°

 

24" (11/7/18): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 30" diameter, broad weak concentration.  Three mag 9.5-10.5 in an equilateral triangle (sides ~3.5') lies roughly 7' SE.  IC 1768 is the brightest in a collinear trio with comparable redshifts.

 

ESO 477-020, situated just 3.4' SW, appeared slightly fainter (nearly fairly faint), small, slightly elongated WSW-ENE, 30"x20".  A mag 13.5 star is 1' ENE and a mag 15.5 star was just visible 1' SE.

ESO 477-022, situated 11' NE, was very faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 ~E-W, brighter along the major axis, ~40"x20".  Situated 3' NNE of a mag 9.5 star.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1768 = Sw. XI-33 on 8 Oct 1896 and reported "eeeF; pS; R; 3 9m st near sf form equilateral triangle; ee diff[icult]."  His position is about 4' S of ESO 477-021 and the three bright stars are south-following.  But his position is also 3' SE of ESO 477-020 and the MCG chose this galaxy as IC 1768.  As ESO 477-021 is brighter by a 1/2 mag or so, it is much more likely the one Swift found.  Swift's combined 11th list gives the discovery date on the 18th but he apparently left for a trip to the east coast on that date and in an earlier published list in AJ, the discovery date is stated as 8 October.

******************************

 

IC 1773 = NGC 804 = UGC 1557 = MCG +05-05-049 = CGCG 504-001 = PGC 7873

02 04 02.1 +30 49 59; Tri

V = 13.7;  Size 1.4'x0.3';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 7°

 

See observing notes for NGC 804.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1773 = Big. 372 on 24 Dec 1897 while searching for NGC 804.  As Swift's RA was 22 seconds too large Bigourdan mistook a faint star for NGC 804 and when he picked up Big. 372 = NGC 804, he assumed it was new.  So IC 1773 is a rediscovery of NGC 804 with discovery priority to Swift. See Corwin's notes.

******************************

 

IC 1778 = IC 199 = UGC 1594 = MCG +01-06-041 = CGCG 413-041 = PGC 8026

02 06 19.4 +09 13 39; Psc

V = 14.0;  Size 1.4'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 24°

 

See observing notes for IC 199.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1778 = J. 912 on 29 Jan 1897.  This was his second observation of IC 199, having discovered it on 15 Dec 1892, along with IC 198.   He made the comment that IC 1778 was found while measuring IC 198, though apparently he didn't realize he had already placed it in his second discovery list along with IC 198.

******************************

 

IC 1781 = KUG 0204-007 = CGCG 387-037 = PGC 8067

02 06 52.8 -00 31 05; Cet

V = 14.2;  Size 0.65'x0.5';  PA = 126°

 

24" (12/28/16): at 432x; faint, very small, round, 20" diameter, low surface brightness patch with no structure.  UGC 1597 = Mrk 1018 is 16' NW and logged as fairly faint, slightly elongated N-S, 25"x20".  Two 13th magnitude stars are 50" NW and 1.0' W and a mag 14.5 star is 1.0' ESE.

 

In the 1980s, prominent broad lines appeared in the optical spectrum of Mrk 1018, a black-hole system and it was classified as a Sy1. The leading explanation for this change is that the accretion rate onto the black hole increased, energizing more of the gas and expanding the size of the broad-line region. But in 2016 it was found that in the past five years, Mrk 1018 had returned to its original state. This unusual transition is thought to be due to a decrease in the black-hole accretion rate.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1781 = J. 3-915 on 8 Oct 1896 and noted "faint, round, 15" to 20" diameter, stellar nucleus mag 14."

******************************

 

IC 1782 = NGC 823 = ESO 478-002 = MCG -04-06-005 = PGC 8093

02 07 20.1 -25 26 31; For

V = 12.6;  Size 1.8'x1.3';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 110°

 

See observing notes for NGC 823.

 

John Herschel discovered NGC 823 = h196 on 14 Oct 1830 and recorded "A vF double star enclosed in a vF neb."  Herschel also observed this nebula at the Cape (h2460) and gave the same description.

 

Lewis Swift found this object on 8 Oct 1896 searching for Comet 1889V (Brooks).  Sw. XI-34 (later IC 1782) was described as "vF; D* of = mag in nebulosity.  Curious object."  He added the note "This appears like a nebulous double star, but I think it is simply a double star in a nebula.  There is a vast difference between a nebulous star, and a star in a nebula."  Dreyer must have missed the close match of Swift's and JH's position and their descriptions are virtually identical.  So, NGC 823 = IC 1782.  See Corwin's notes.

******************************

 

IC 1783 = ESO 354-046 = MCG -06-05-037 = LGG 052-001 = PGC 8279

02 10 06.1 -32 56 23; For

V = 12.5;  Size 2.0'x0.8';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 3°

 

17.5" (10/8/94): faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 SSW-NNE, 1.5'x0.7', broad concentration.  A mag 13 star is 1.8' WSW of center.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1783 = Sw. XI-35 on 29 Dec 1897 and recorded "vF; vS; eE; nearly 0°; F * p."  His position is fairly poor, but the identification is certain based on his description.  Swift originally included it in his third list of new nebulae from Lowe Observatory and gave the discovery date as 4 Sep 1787 with a less detailed description ("very faint, small, vE, one * nr.") and it was given in his fourth list with date 29 Sep 1897!  Delisle Stewart also found it on an Arequipa plate taken in 1899.  He described it as "cB, cL, vmE at 0°, cbM."

******************************

 

IC 1787 = IC 217 = MCG -02-06-046 = 2MFGC 1761 = PGC 8673

02 16 10.4 -11 55 36; Cet

V = 13.6;  Size 2.2'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 35°

 

See observing notes for IC 217.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1787 = Sw. XI-37 on 12 Oct 1896 and recorded "eeF; eeE; a ray bet 2 st p[receding] and f[ollowing]; 8m star near [north-following]."  His position is only 1.5' S of IC 1787, but a perfect match in description.  Dreyer didn't catch the equivalence IC 1787 = IC 217.

******************************

 

IC 1788 = ESO 415-015 = MCG -05-06-011 = LGG 052-003 = PGC 8649

02 15 50.0 -31 12 04; For

V = 12.3;  Size 2.6'x1.1';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 27°

 

17.5" (12/28/94): moderately bright, fairly large, nearly edge-on 4:1 SSW-NNE, 2.5'x0.6', broad concentration.  A mag 14 star is just west of the SSW end 1.6' from the center.  A wide pair of mag 10-11 stars at 36" separation lies 10' SSE.  Relatively bright for an IC galaxy.

 

17.5" (10/29/94): fairly faint, moderately large, very elongated 3:1 SSW-NNE, 2.1'x0.7', broad concentration.  A mag 14 star is just preceding the SSW tip.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1788 = Sw. XI-36 on 25 Dec 1897 and logged "pF; pS; R; distant D * nf."  In this earlier third discovery list from Lowe Observatory he gave the discovery date as 5 Sep 1897 (apparently correct as the list is date 12 Sep 1897)and called it "pretty bright".

******************************

 

IC 1795 = LBN 645 = LBN 646 = LBN 647 = W3 = Ced 6

02 26 32 +62 02 29; Cas

Size 21'

 

18" (10/13/07): NGC 896 and IC 1795 form a bright, detailed HII region at the NW corner of the huge IC 1805 HII ring ("Heart Nebula").  This complex is split into three or 4 distinct sections by dust lanes (LDN 1359).  The largest section is IC 1795, which extends mostly north of a mag 10 star for ~8'.  To the west of the mag 10 star is a dust lane oriented NW-SE and beyond this lane to the west is a small, moderately high surface brightness patch (NGC 896) of 2' diameter.  To the east of the star is another broad dust lane extending N-S and following this lane is a fainter wash of nebulosity that streams to the north for over 15' in length.  It passes through mag 9 SAO 12287 and just north of this star the nebulosity has a small, brighter patch.  Initially, I thought the complex ended here on the NE side, but then additional fainter nebulosity was noticed spreading out to the west for several arc minutes increasing the total size to 15'-20' for both N-S and E-W directions.

 

17.5" (11/27/92): observation at 100x using an OIII filter.  This is the northeastern section of a large emission complex with NGC 896.  Very large, about 10' diameter, roundish, fainter than NGC 895 but still moderately bright.  A mag 9.5 star is embedded at the SE edge and several fainter stars are superimposed.  A small detached piece of nebulosity is visible about 10' N with a mag 11.5 off the south edge and several fainter stars are at the edges or superimposed.  NGC 896 and IC 1795 form the NE component with the IC 1805 ("Heart Nebula") complex spread out to the SE.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1795 photographically, probably with the 6" Willard lens.  The IC description is simply "Patch of neby".

******************************

 

IC 1799 = NGC 920 = UGC 1943 = MCG +08-05-012 = CGCG 553-014 = PGC 9432

02 28 45.9 +45 58 14; And

V = 13.6;  Size 1.1'x0.4';  Surf Br = 12.7;  PA = 34°

 

17.5" (8/5/97): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 SW-NE, broad concentration to a brighter core.  A mag 14 star is at the west edge .  Viewed after glimpsing UGC 1920 (the galaxy taken to be NGC 920), which is 9.5' W.

 

UGC 1920 (listed as NGC 920 in all modern sources) appeared extremely faint, moderately large, ~1.5' diameter, very low surface brightness, required averted vision to glimpse.  This roundish unconcentrated glow is situated within a group of stars including a mag 11 star 1.6' WSW and mag 13 stars 1' NW and 1' SE.  I would not have noticed this object without averted vision and knowing the exact location using a printed finder chart.  Located 9.5' W of much brighter NGC 920 = IC 1799 and 15' WNW of NGC 933.

 

17.5" (11/26/94): fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 5:2 SSW-NNE, 1.0'x0.4', broad concentration to a fairly bright core and occasional stellar nucleus.  A mag 14 star is very close west and a mag 12 star (unequal double) is 1.4' NNW.  Located in a rich star field 11' WSW of a mag 7 SAO 38067.  Brighter of a pair with NGC 933 6.6' ESE.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1799 = Big. 251 on 28 Jan 1891.  Lewis Swift is likely the original discoverer on 11 Sep 1885, but his position was 1.0 minute of time too small and Bigourdan assumed his discovery was new.  I suggested the equivalence of NGC 920 = IC 1799 = UGC 1943 to Corwin and Steinicke, instead of the standard identification NGC 920 = UGC 1920. They both concur with this identity.  See NGC 920, as well as Corwin's identification notes.

******************************

 

IC 1801 = Arp 276 NED2 = VV 238b = UGC 1936 = MCG +03-07-016 = LGG 061-005 = PGC 9392

02 28 12.9 +19 34 60; Ari

V = 13.8;  Size 1.3'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 30°

 

17.5" (1/20/90): very faint, very small, elongated SW-NE, low surface brightness.  Forms a double system very close off the southeast end of NGC 935!

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1801 = J. 3-926 on 18 Dec 1897 and recorded "F, 20" to 25", glbM, dif."  It's a bit surprising that Lewis Swift, who discovered NGC 935, missed this faint companion.

******************************

 

IC 1802 = MCG +04-06-057 = CGCG 483-067 = PGC 9462

02 29 14.0 +23 04 58; Ari

V = 13.5;  Size 1.3'x1.1';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 120°

 

24" (1/1/16): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 30" diameter, very small bright core.  A mag 12 star is 1' NW. A faint companion (PGC 1681200) 45" ENE of center was not noticed.  First in a group with IC 1803 and 1804 ~9' ENE.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1802, along with IC 1803 and 1804, on 29 Oct 1888 using the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  His notebook sketch clearly identifies the trio, with IC 1802 = CGCG 483-067 = PGC 9462, although his computed position (sent directly to Dreyer) is poor 33 seconds of time too small and 2.2' too far north.  He noted "the p[receding] of 3. 1' s.f. 11m star."

 

His poor position for IC 1803, though, happens to fall closer to IC 1802 and PGC, RC3 and HyperLeda (as well as secondary sources such as Uranometria 2000.0 Sky Atlas and Megastar) misidentify IC 1802 as IC 1803.  NED has the correct position as Harold Corwin correctly identified this galaxy.

******************************

 

IC 1803 = MCG +04-06-058 = PGC 9507

02 29 50.0 +23 06 31; Ari

V = 14.4;  Size 0.5'x0.5'

 

24" (1/1/16): at 375x; faint, very small, round, 15" diameter.  Fainter of a pair with IC 1804 1.3' SE.  The pair points to a mag 10.5 star situated 2.4' NW.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1803, along with IC 1802 and 1804, on 29 Oct 1888 with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  His notebook sketch clearly identifies the trio, with IC 1803 = MCG +04-06-058 = PGC 9507, although his computed position (sent directly to Dreyer) is 32 seconds of time too small and 2.5' too far north (similar offset as IC 1802).  He noted "the p[receding] of 2 [with IC 1804], occasionally a star like point seen in b [IC 1803]."

 

His poor position for IC 1803, though, falls closer to this galaxy and PGC, RC3 and HyperLeda (as well as secondary sources such as Uranometria 2000.0 Sky Atlas and Megastar) misidentify IC 1802 as IC 1803.

******************************

 

IC 1804 = MCG +04-06-060 = CGCG 483-068 = PGC 9512

02 29 54.4 +23 05 49; Ari

V = 13.8;  Size 0.9'x0.9'

 

24" (1/1/16): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 24" diameter, small brighter nucleus, low surface brightness halo.  Brighter of a pair with IC 1803 1.3' NW.  CGCG 483-070 = PGC 9527 lies 6' NE and logged as faint, small, round, 18" diameter, very small brighter nucleus.  Located 6' NE of IC 1803/1804 pair.  A mag 13 star is 1.6' WSW.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1804, along with IC 1802 and 1803, on 29 Oct 1888.  His notebook sketch clearly identifies the trio, with IC 1804 (marked as "c") correspoinding to CGCG 483-068 = PGC 9512.  He reported a poor position to Dreyer, but his offset from mag 10.4 star Tycho 1766:638:1 is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1805 = LBN 656 = W4 = Ced 7 = Sh 2-190 = LBN 654 = Cr 26 = Mel 15 = Heart Nebula

02 32 42 +61 27; Cas

V = 6.5;  Size 100'x80'

 

18" (10/13/07): IC 1805, which is dubbed the "Heart Nebula", is a cluster (Cr 26 = Melotte 15) involved with a huge emission complex (LBN 654) . The central cluster Mel 15 was striking at 73x, consisting of a 20' scattered group of mag 8 and fainter stars (I estimated 17 stars mag 8-10.5). Embedded within the group is a smaller, fairly rich, 4'x2.5' oval ring with over three dozen stars. Most of the stars are located along the irregular ring, itself, and not in the interior. On the SW side is the brightest member mag 8 HD 15558, an O5-type giant, which has a mag 10.5 companion at 10" separation (ADS 1920). The central region is richest around this pair with 9 or 10 stars in total packed into a 1.6' region.

 

Adding an OIII filter, the cluster was encased in a fairly bright, irregular glow, ~12-15' in diameter and extending mostly to the east of the cluster. There appears to be dark lanes or obscuring dust involved as the surface brightness is irregular with brighter filaments within the glow. Fainter nebulosity extends to the east and then abruptly bifurcates into two branches, one heading NE and the other SE. There's a sharp border to the nebulosity at the split as the sky directly east immediately darkens, adding to the contrast.

 

Following the stream of nebulosity to the NE, it extends roughly 20' in that direction but then curves back sharply towards the west where it meanders for 30'-40', ending about 30' N of the cluster. Only 20' E of the bend at the NE corner is the fairly large open cluster, NGC 1027 (see notes) .

 

The southern river of nebulosity can be followed around in a huge loop. First it gently curves to the south or SSE for ~40' and then loops back sharply towards the west (this band forms the southern boundary of the "Heart") for at least 40', heading towards a distinctive N-S string of 5 stars with a length of 6'. This group is catalogued as Markarian 6 = Stock 7. At the south end of Mrk 6 are two doubles, ∑264 = 8.6/9.8 at 17" and ∑263 = 10/11 pair at 17".

 

At this point, the rim bends to the north and brightens noticeably in a 10' patch. It dims and continues on further to the north, passing about 25' W of the cluster and fades out pretty close to NGC 896, a nearly isolated bright patch to the NW of the main structure.  Near the northwest end of IC 1805 is Tombaugh 4, a low surface brightness cluster that requires high power to partially resolve.

 

I had now traced around the entire outline of the "Heart Nebula" visible on wide-field images, scanning over a degree and a half from north to south and perhaps 1.25° in extent from west to east. The entire outline, including the weaker interior glow, was also visible at 12.5x in my 80mm finder using an OIII filter, although without the detail visible in the main scope.

 

NGC 896 and IC 1795 are parts of a fairly bright, detailed region at the NW corner of this huge ring. The complex appears split into three or 4 distinct sections by dust lanes (LDN 1359). The largest section is IC 1795, which extends mostly north of a mag 10 star for ~8'. To the west of the mag 10 star is a dust lane oriented NW-SE and beyond this lane to the west is a small, moderately high surface brightness glow (NGC 896) of 2' diameter. To the east of the star is another broad dust lane extending N-S and east of this lane is a fainter wash of nebulosity that streams to the north for over 15' in length. It passes through mag 9 SAO 12287 and just north of this star the nebulosity has another small, brighter patch. Initially, I thought the complex ended here on the NE side, but additional fainter nebulosity was noticed spreading out to the west, increasing the total size to 15'-20' for both N-S and E-W directions.

 

Comparing my descriptions to the MegaStar outline, I noticed that the cluster Mrk 6 (perhaps it's an asterism) is not plotted, although the brighter stars are, of course. Secondly, the outline shows a large gap between the NW end of the Heart and NGC 896. Visually, it appeared the Heart Nebula extended closer to 896. Finally, I picked up additional nebulosity to the north of NGC 896 not shown on MegaStar. At the section of the rim ~25' W of Mel 15 is the "bright-rimmed cloud" BRC 5, which was not noticed visually, though contains many T Tauri candidates.

 

17.5" (11/27/92): about 125 stars forming a bright, very large 40' field at 100x.  In the center is an oval ring consisting of about 30 stars within a 4'-5' diameter including a bright 8th magnitude multiple star (Stein 368).  The brighter stars in the outer region form a rough incomplete circular outline.  Using 100x with an OIII filter, the associated nebulosity (LBN 654) is clearly entwined within a large portion of the cluster.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1805 photographically with the discovery communicated directly to Dreyer.  The NGC position is off by 1 tmin in RA (same as IC 1824 = NGC 1027).  Barnard gave a corrected position in his Atlas of the Milky Way.

 

The Heart (IC 1805) and Soul (IC 1848) nebulae are part of the Cas OB6 Association, a sprawling complex of gas, dust and massive O- and B-class stars at a distance ~7500 light years in the Perseus Arm.

******************************

 

IC 1807 = MCG +04-06-062 = CGCG 483-071 = PGC 9547

02 30 31.0 +22 57 00; Ari

V = 14.5;  Size 0.5'x0.5'

 

24" (11/21/19): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 24" diameter, contains a brighter quasi-stellar nucleus.  Collinear with a mag 11.6 star 2' SW and a mag 13.1 star 2.4' NE.  IC 1809 lies 16' ESE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1807 = J. 3-928, along with IC 1809, on 16 Jan 1896.

******************************

 

IC 1808 = NGC 963 = MCG -01-07-017 = PGC 9545

02 30 31.0 -04 12 59; Cet

V = 13.4;  Size 0.7'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.5

 

See observing notes for NGC 963.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1808 = J. 3-929 on 14 Dec 1903.  His position matches MCG -01-07-017 = PGC 9545.  This galaxy was discovered by Leavenworth in 1886 but his rough RA for LM 2-339 (later NGC 963) was 1.3 minutes too large.  So, NGC 963 = IC 1808, with discovery priority to Leavenworth.

******************************

 

IC 1809 = UGC 1996 = MCG +04-07-004 = CGCG 484-002 = III Zw 48 = PGC 9616

02 31 40.4 +22 55 02; Ari

V = 14.1;  Size 1.0'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 50°

 

24" (11/21/19): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 3:2 NW-SE, 30"x20".  A faint star is superimposed at the NE tip [12" from center].  IC 1807 lies 16' WNW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1809 = J. 3-930, along with IC 1807, on 16 Jan 1896.

******************************

 

IC 1811 = ESO 355-020 = AM 0228-342 NED01 = MCG -06-06-008 = PGC 9555

02 30 38.2 -34 15 51; For

V = 13.4;  Size 1.3'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 7°

 

24" (11/7/18): fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated N-S, ~0.6"x0.5", slightly brighter core.  A mag 14.6 star is at the east edge [24" ESE of center].  A wide mag 13.5/14 pair is 3.5' NW.  Forms a pair with slightly smaller IC 1813 3.5' NE.  Located 42' SE of mag 5.1 Phi Fornacis.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1811 = Sw. XI-38, along with IC 1813, on 22 Dec 1897 and reported "eeeF; S; R; D * nearly p; np of 2."  His position is 40 seconds of RA too small.  He confused the orientation in his description as his position is correctly southwest of IC 1813, and the"D[ouble] *" is probably the pair northwest.

******************************

 

IC 1813 = ESO 355-022 = AM 0228-342 NED2 = MCG -06-06-009 = PGC 9567

02 30 49.5 -34 13 15; For

V = 13.2;  Size 1.2'x0.9';  PA = 102°

 

24" (11/7/18): fairly faint, fairly small, slightly elongated E-W, ~30" diameter, slightly brighter core.  Forms a pair with IC 1811 3.5' SW. A wide mag 13.5/14 pair is 4' W and a mag 13 star is less than 2' N [unequal double].

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1813 = Sw. XI-39, along with IC 1811, on 22 Dec 1897 and reported "eF; eS; R; F * near n; D * np; sf of 2."

******************************

 

IC 1814 = NGC 964 = ESO 355-024 = MCG -06-06-010 = PGC 9582

02 31 05.8 -36 02 06; For

V = 12.6;  Size 2.0'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.5;  PA = 31°

 

See observing notes for NGC 964.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1814 = Sw. XI-40 on 22 Dec 1897 and reported "pB; pS; vE."  There is nothing at his position but 40 seconds of RA east is NGC 964.  This galaxy was discovered by John Herschel on 1 Sep 1834 and described as "B, pmE, psbM, 30" long; position 215.7 degrees."  So, IC 1814 = NGC 964, with discovery priority to Herschel.

******************************

 

IC 1815 = UGC 2047 = MCG +05-07-014 = CGCG 505-0 13 = PGC 9794

02 34 20.0 +32 25 46; Tri

V = 12.9;  Size 1.7'x1.6';  Surf Br = 13.8

 

18" (1/26/11): fairly faint to moderately bright, fairly small, round, 35" diameter, even moderate concentration to a small bright core and stellar nucleus.  Located 3.5' SE of mag 7.6 HD 15896 and 4.5' S of NGC 973.  I'm surprised Swift missed this galaxy but picked up NGC 973, a lower surface brightness edge-on.

 

17.5" (11/30/91): fairly faint, small, irregularly round, small bright core, stellar nucleus.  Located 3.5' ESE of mag 7.5 SAO 55664.  Smaller but higher surface brightness than NGC 973 4.5' N.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1815 = J. 3-931 on 20 Jan 1898 with the 30-inch refractor at the Nice Observatory.  He recorded "F, R, 20" to 25", gbM, mag 14 stellar nucleus."

******************************

 

IC 1816 = ESO 355-025 = AM 0229-365 = MCG -06-06-011 = PGC 9634

02 31 51.0 -36 40 19; For

V = 13.0;  Size 1.3'x1.2';  Surf Br = 13.5

 

24" (11/7/18): at 260x; nearly moderately bright (affected by low elevation), round, 35" diameter, bright core with a small brighter nucleus.  Two mag 10.2 and 11.3 stars (separation ~1.5') lies ~5' NW.  Located 15' SSW of mag 6.3 HD 15889.  MCG -06-06-014, located 20' SE, appeared fairly faint, small, round, 15" (core region only viewed).

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1816 = Sw. XI-41 on 12 Oct 1896 and noted "vF; S; R; wide D * near p[receding]."  His position is 5' too far south and the wide double is ~5' NW.

******************************

 

IC 1824 = NGC 1027 = Cr 30 = Mel 16

02 42 35 +61 35 42; Cas

V = 6.7;  Size 20'

 

See observing notes for NGC 1027.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1824 (probably photographically) in the early 1890's at Lick Observatory.  The discovery was transmitted directly to Dreyer and not published.  His position is at the west edge of the cluster NGC 1027 and his description reads "Cl, sts F, perh[aps] F neby p extends to it."  William Herschel discovered NGC 1027 on 3 Nov 1787. So IC 1824 = NGC 1027.

******************************

 

IC 1826 = IC 1830 = Haro 18 = ESO 416-006 = MCG -05-07-012 = UGCA 37 = PGC 10041

02 39 03.6 -27 26 37; For

V = 12.8;  Size 1.7'x1.4';  Surf Br = 13.5

 

17.5" (12/9/01): moderately bright and large, elongated 4:3 WNW-ESE, 1.2'x0.9', brighter core.  A mag 10.5 star (SAO 167947) lies 1.3' W of center.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1826 = Sw. XI-42 on 6 Sep 1897 and noted "pB; cS; R, 8m * near preceding."  His RA is 38 seconds too small, but the mag 10.4 star close west clinches the identification.  DeLisle Stewart found this galaxy again on a photographic plate taken in 1901 at Harvard's station in Arequipa, Peru.  He referenced Swift's position, but assumed D.S. 162 (later IC 1830) was different and reported "very faint, small, prob. round, eF * 1.5' sp; susp[ected]."  Stewart's position is accurte, although the nearby star is not "extremely faint".

******************************

 

IC 1827 = UGC 2152 = MCG +00-07-075 = CGCG 388-089 = PGC 10087

02 39 46.5 +01 33 30; Cet

V = 13.7;  Size 1.1'x0.2';  Surf Br = 12.0;  PA = 154°

 

17.5" (11/26/94): faint, small, very elongated 3:1 NW-SE, 0.6'x0.2', bright core.  A mag 13 star is very close to the SE end 28" from the center.  Forms a pair with NGC 1038 5.6' SE.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1827 = J. 3-938 on 21 Dec 1903 with the 30-inch refractor at the Nice Observatory.  He recorded "F, 15" to 20", fan-shaped, star 13-14 in contact."

******************************

 

IC 1828 = NGC 1036 = UGC 2160 = MCG +03-07-041 = CGCG 462-041 = Mrk 370 = PGC 10127

02 40 29.1 +19 17 50; Ari

V = 13.2;  Size 1.4'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 5°

 

See observing notes for NGC 1036.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1828 = J. 3-939 on 18 Jan 1898.  His position matches NGC 1036 = UGC 2160, a galaxy discovered by William Herschel with a fairly good position.  So it's surprising neither Javelle nor Dreyer realized that IC 1828 = NGC 1036.

******************************

 

IC 1830 = IC 1826 = Haro 18 = ESO 416-006 = MCG -05-07-012 = UGCA 37 = PGC 10041

02 39 03.6 -27 26 37; For

V = 12.8;  Size 1.7'x1.4';  Surf Br = 13.5

 

17.5" (12/9/01): moderately bright and large, elongated 4:3 WNW-ESE, 1.2'x0.9', brighter core.  A mag 10.5 star (SAO 167947) lies 1.3' W of center.

 

DeLisle Stewart found IC 1830 = D.S. 162 on a photographic plate taken in 1901 at Harvard's station in Arequipa, Peru.  He noted "vF, S, susp, ef* 1.5' sp."  Lewis Swift discovered this galaxy on 6 Sep 1897 and recorded Sw. XI-42 as "pB; cS; R, 8m * near preceding."  His RA is 38 seconds too small so Dreyer assumed the two objects were different, but the equivalence IC 1826 = 1830 is certain.

******************************

 

IC 1833 = ESO 416-007 = MCG -05-07-013 = PGC 10205

02 41 38.7 -28 10 17; For

V = 13.1;  Size 1.5'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 63°

 

24" (1/1/19): at 260x; fairly faint, moderately large, oval 4:3 SW-NE, well defined brighter 25" core.  Low surface brightness halo with averted, ~50"x35".  Located 16' W of mag 6.8 HD 17005.  Two very wide bright pairs are ~8' N.

 

A quadruple system (HD 16914) lies 14' NNE. A mag 11 star is ~30" E of the primary and a 20" pair of 14th mag stars are close SE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1833 = Sw. XI-43 on 22 Dec 1897, reporting "eeF; S; R; 3 fine D st nf, each about 7" [separation]."  His RA is 18 seconds too small, but the identification is certain with the pairs to the NNE.  Howe's accurate position (measured in 1900) was used in the IC 2.

******************************

 

IC 1837 = NGC 1072 = UGC 2208 = MCG +00-07-088 = CGCG 388-103 = PGC 10315

02 43 31.3 +00 18 25; Cet

V = 13.4;  Size 1.5'x0.5';  Surf Br = 12.9;  PA = 11°

 

See observing notes for NGC 1072.

 

Stephane Javelle found IC 1837 = J. 3-945 on 24 Jan 1898.  There is nothing at his position but Harold Corwin found that he reversed the sign of his declination offset from his reference star.  Once corrected, IC 1837 = NGC 1072.  Although this is a reasonable assumption (it occured in several other cases), it's odd that Javelle described NGC 1072 as round as it appeared noticeably elongated in both of my observations.  NGC 1072 as discovered by Stephan on 20 Dec 1881.

******************************

 

IC 1840 = NGC 1105 = MCG -03-08-004 = PGC 10333

02 43 42.0 -15 42 20; Cet

V = 14.3;  Size 0.7'x0.7';  Surf Br = 13.4

 

18" (11/26/03): very faint, small, slightly elongated SW-NE, 0.5'x0.4', broad concentration with a round 20" core.  Located 6' NW of mag 8.9 SAO 148573.  NGC 1081 lies 20' ENE.

 

Herbert Howe found IC 1840 = Ho. 3-7 on 30 Jan 1900 and reported "vF, vS mbM; near [NGC 1081]."  His position matches MCG -03-08-004 = PGC 10333.  This galaxy was discovered earlier by Leavenworth on 2 Dec 1885 and catalogued in list I-71 (later NGC 1105) but his rough position was very poor -- 4.5 minutes of RA too far east.  Howe ran across the galaxy while searching for NGC 1105, which he assumed was new, and reported also finding MCG -03-08-036 = PGC 10867 4 minutes of RA following Leavenworth's position.  As Dreyer published Howe's "correction" in the IC 2 notes, PGC 10867 is known as NGC 1105 in modern sources, though that designation should apply to IC 1840.

******************************

 

IC 1845 = HDO 60

02 43 57.0 -27 58 06; For

V = 9.2/10.3;  Size 9"

 

24" (12/6/18): at 260x, this number possibly applies to the double star HDO 60, a mag 9.2/10.5 pair at 9" separation.  It was easily separated at 220x, though when discovered the separation was considerably less and the pair might have appeared nebulous.  Bu 261, a close mag 7.9/9.2 pair at 3", lies 5' NW with a very wide mag 10.5 component 1' SE.

 

SIMBAD identifies ESO 416-015 as IC 1845.  At 260x, this galaxy appeared fairly faint, fairly small, oval 3:2 NW-SE, 30"x20", slightly brighter core, fairly low surface brightness.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1845 = Sw. XI-44 on 22 Dec 1897 and noted it as "eeF, S, R, D[ouble] * np".  There is nothing near his position except a mag 10.3 star, which hardly could be called "eeF".  Corwin suggests this number refers to the double star, a mag 9.2/10.3 pair at 9" (only 5" separation in 1870), which is situated 1 minute of RA west of Swift's position.  Furthermore, there is a very bright and wide double roughly 4' NW that would fit Swift's position.  ESO suggested ESO 416-015, situated about 40 seconds of RA east of Swift's position, might be IC 1845 (this is the identification adopted by SIMBAD, but there is no double star northwest, so this identification seems less likely.

******************************

 

IC 1846 = NGC 1109 = UGC 2265 = MCG +02-08-006 = CGCG 440-008 = PGC 10573

02 47 43.6 +13 15 20; Ari

V = 14.0;  Size 1.0'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.6

 

17.5" (1/9/99): faint, small, round, 25" diameter, weak concentration, very faint stellar nucleus with direct vision.  Situated 2.5' ENE of a mag 11.5 star.  The NGC identification of this galaxy is very uncertain due to poor positions in the group by Marth and UGC, MCG and CGCG identify this galaxy as IC 1846.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1846 = J. 3-952, along with IC 1850 and 1852, on 7 Jan 1896.  His position matches UGC 2265 = PGC 10573 and this identification is secure.  Harold Corwin suggests that NGC 1109, discovered by Albert Marth in a large group, refers to IC 1846, though Marth's RA is 2 minutes east.   Marth's positions for NGC 1109, 1111, 1112, 1113, 1117 are off by differing amounts, so this identification is very insecure and other assignments are possible.

 

UGC, MCG, CGCG, PGC and HyperLeda label this galaxy as IC 1846, but NED and SIMBAD give NGC 1109 as the primary designation with IC 1846 as an alternate designation.    See my notes, Corwin's notes and Courtney Seligman's entry for NGC 1109.

******************************

 

IC 1848 = LBN 667 = Sh 2-199 = Ced 9 = Cr 32 = Cr 33 = Cr 34 = Soul Nebula = Baby Nebula = Embryo Nebula

02 51 12 +60 24; Cas

V = 6.5;  Size 100'x50'

 

18" (10/13/07): I only took a fairly quick look at this huge HII region ("Soul Nebula" or "Baby Nebula") at the end of the evening after a long examination of IC 1705 ("Heart Nebula").  In comparison, portions of this object clearly have a higher surface brightness using an OIII filter at 73x.  Near the center is an E-W elongated, scattered group of stars (Cr 32), ~10'x4' in size.  On the west end are two mag 7.3/8.3 stars (2' pair of O-class stars: HD 17505 (the primary ionization source) and HD 17520) with a number of fainter stars huddled nearby.  About 60' to the ENE is another larger, scattered group (Cr 34).  Weak nebulosity is evident throughout the field without a filter.

 

Adding an OIII filter greatly increases the contrast and nebulosity is fairly prominent in several different sections.  About 20' E of Cr 32 is a brighter, elongated patch.  To the east of this patch is a dark lane or intrusion and on the eastern side is a brighter, 10' circular glow (IC 1871) with an irregular outline. IC 1871 is located roughly 45' ENE of Cr 32.  This patch is irregular in surface brightness with brighter streaks.  A larger region spreads out to the east of the cluster increasing the total length to over 1.5 degrees.  I also noticed brighter regions of nebulosity to the west of Cr 32, but didn't take notes on this area or try to follow the entire outline of the complex.

 

17.5" (10/2/99): at 100x, this large but weak grouping is dominated by a 2' pair of mag 7/8 stars which are both surrounded by several close, faint companions.  The surrounding one degree field is undistinguished but it appears weakly concentrated around the bright pair.  Faint nebulosity is visible in portions of the field.  At 220x, the view is striking with ~12 stars huddled around the southern mag 9 star including a nice pair of mag 12 stars nearly collinear and equally spaced.  The brighter mag 7 star (∑306) is surrounded by 8-10 companions.  The 20' field is fairly rich but scattered with a matched pair of mag 9 stars ~10' N.

 

Using a UHC filter at 100x, the field is immersed in a very large, faint nebulosity about a degree in length, elongated E-W.  A large, bright region elongated N-S is at the east end, ~35  following the core, and seems detached from the main cloud.  It surrounds a weak scattered group (Cr 34) that is devoid of stars in the center.  The main body of nebulosity has a sharper border and is generally brighter to the north of the core and fades into the background on the south side.  The outline is interesting on the north side with irregular extensions and bulges.  A small brighter circular patch stands out at the west end about 10' W of the core.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1848 photographically and notified Dreyer directly.  The IC description reads "Cl, st F, extends 8 min. f, in F neby."  The Heart (IC 1805) and Soul (IC 1848) nebulae are part of the Cas OB6 Association, a sprawling complex of gas, dust and massive O- and B-class stars at a distance ~7500 light years in the Perseus Arm.

******************************

 

IC 1850 = NGC 1111 = LEDA 1426583

02 48 39.3 +13 15 34; Ari

Size 0.7'x0.3';  PA = 9°

 

17.5" (1/9/99): extremely faint, very small, elongated 3:1 SSW- NNE, ~25"x9".  Originally this object appeared virtually stellar as I probably just detected the core but after viewing for awhile the thin extensions were noticed.  Located 5.6' NW of IC 1852.  The NGC identification from Marth of this galaxy is very uncertain, although it was correctly placed by Javelle (IC 1850).  The galaxy chosen by the RNGC is probably incorrect.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1850 = J. 3-955, along with IC 1846 and 1852, on 7 Jan 1896.  His position is a good match with LEDA 1426583 (not in CGCG, MCG or PGC).  Harold Corwin suggests that NGC 1111, found by Marth in 1863, refers to this galaxy although Marth's RA is 1.0 minute further east.  Courtney Seligman notes that IC 1850 could just as easily be equated with NGC 1109 as the NGC positions are close.  In any case, the IC identification is secure.  See my notes, Corwin's notes and Courtney Seligman's entry for NGC 1109.

******************************

 

IC 1852 = NGC 1112 = UGC 2293 = MCG +02-08-011 = CGCG 440-015 = PGC 10660

02 49 00.4 +13 13 25; Ari

V = 13.8;  Size 1.2'x0.9';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 3°

 

17.5" (1/9/99): very faint, fairly small, ~40"x25".  Appears as a very low surface brightness glow with no noticeable concentration and an ill-defined edge.  After extended viewing could hold continuously with direct vision.  IC 1850 = NGC 1111: lies 5.6' NW and IC 1846 = NGC 1109: is 19' W.  The NGC identification is very uncertain due to a poor position from Marth. This galaxy is identified as IC 1852 in CGCG, UGC and MCG and identified as NGC 1109 in RNGC and RC3.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1852 = J. 3-956, along with IC 1846 and 1850, on 7 Jan 1896.  His position is a good match with UGC 2293 = PGC 10660.  Harold Corwin suggests that NGC 1112, found by Marth in 1863, refers to this galaxy though his position 1 min of RA further east.  Marth's positions for NGC 1109, 1111, 1112, 1113, 1117 are all off in RA, so this identification is not definite but very possible.  See my notes, Corwin's notes and Courtney Seligman's website entry for NGC 1109.

 

 

Albert Marth discovered NGC 1112 = m 77 on 2 Dec 1863 with Lassell's 48" on Malta and logged "F, pS".  This is the third in a group of 8 galaxies he discovered that night, several of which (NGC 1109, 1111, 1112, 1113, 1117) have identification problems because of poor positions or possibly he confused faint stars as nebulous.

 

Harold Corwin suggests NGC 1112 may refer IC 1852 = UGC 2293 = PGC 10660.  Stephane Javelle discovered this galaxy on 7 Jan 1896 with the 30-inch refractor at the Nice Observatory.  Marth's position is exactly 1.0 min of RA following IC 1852 and matches in declination.  CGCG, UGC and MCG label this galaxy IC 1852, while RNGC, PGC, RC3 and Megastar identify it as NGC 1109.  RNGC classifies NGC 1112 as nonexistent.  Finally, HyperLEDA equates IC 1852 with NGC 1109.  Although NGC 1112 = IC 1852 is a reasonable match, given all the problems in this region this identification is very uncertain. See Corwin's notes for NGC 1109 and Courtney's Seligman website for NGC 1112.

******************************

 

IC 1853 = MCG -02-08-006 = LGG 076-001 = PGC 10595

02 48 04.3 -13 59 35; Eri

V = 14.2;  Size 1.0'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 91°

 

17.5" (12/28/94): extremely faint, very small.  Just glimpsed 2.0' SSW of NGC 1103.  Too faint to view any additional details.

 

Herbert Howe discovered IC 1853 = Ho III-8 on 23 Jan 1900 and recorded "eF, vS, near [NGC] 1103."  His position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1856 = UGC 2291 = MCG +00-08-021 = CGCG 389-021 = PGC 10647

02 48 50.8 -00 46 03; Cet

V = 13.5;  Size 1.1'x0.6';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 60°

 

24" (11/21/19): at 375x; fairly faint but relatively prominent in the field, elongated 2:1 SW-NE, 40"x20", irregular surface brightness.  The galaxy seembed brighter or had a knot at the NE end and was more tapered on the SW end.  There was a strong impression of a brighter elongated core or bar.

 

UGC 2311, situated 11' NE, appeared fairly faint, slightly elongated SW-NE, 50"x40", well defined halo.  Fairly even gradual concentration to the center with a slightly brighter nucleus.  Both galaxies are members of a group (USGC U149) that includes NGCs 1094, 1104 and 1132.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1856 = J. 3-959 on 24 Jan 1898.

******************************

 

IC 1858 = ESO 416-029 = MCG -05-07-033 = PGC 10671

02 49 08.4 -31 17 24; For

V = 13.1;  Size 1.8'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 176°

 

24" (11/23/19): at 375x; between faint and fairly faint, elongated 5:2 N-S, 0.75'x0.3', slightly brighter core, low uneven surface brightness.  One of the brightest members of cluster ACO S301. IC 1860 lies 8' NE.

 

24" (12/6/18): at 260x; between faint and fairly faint, very elongated 3:1 N-S, ~0.9'x0.3', brighter core.  Second brightest member of the galaxy cluster ACO S301.

 

17.5" (12/9/01): extremely faint, small, slightly elongated N-S, 25"x20" (viewed core only).  Faintest in a trio with IC 1859 and IC 1860 in the ACO S301 cluster.  Located 8' SW of IC 1860 and 7' S of IC 1859.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1858 = Sw. XI-45, along with IC 1859 and 1860, on 5 Sep 1897.  He reported "vF; pS; R; 1st of 3."  His RA is 25 seconds too small and IC 1859 is actually a bit further west.  The position was corrected in Robert Baker's 1933 "Catalogue of 985 Extragalactic Nebulae in a Region in Fornax and Eridanus", based on photographs taken with the Bruce astrograph in South Africa.

******************************

 

IC 1859 = ESO 416-028 = MCG -05-07-032 = PGC 10665

02 49 03.9 -31 10 21; For

V = 13.2;  Size 1.2'x0.8';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 35°

 

24" (11/23/19): at 375x; between faint and fairly faint, elongated 5:3 N-S, ~35"x20".  A mag 12.9 star is 1.3' W.  One of the brighter members of the ACO S301 cluster.

 

24" (12/6/18): at 260x; very faint, fairly small, elongated ~2:1 N-S, ~35"x20", low surface brightness with a slightly brighter core.  A mag 12.8 star is 1.4' W.

 

17.5" (12/9/01): faint, small, round, 20" diameter.  Located 1.3' E of a mag 13 star.  First of three with IC 1858 and IC 1860 in the ACO S301 = Klemola 2 cluster.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1859 = Sw. XI-46, along with IC 1858 and 1860, on 5 Sep 1897.  He reported "pF; pS; R; 2nd of 3."  His RA was 25 seconds of time too small.  The position was corrected in Robert Baker's 1933 "Catalogue of 985 Extragalactic Nebulae in a Region in Fornax and Eridanus".

******************************

 

IC 1860 = ESO 416-031 = MCG -05-07-035 = PGC 10707

02 49 33.8 -31 11 23; For

V = 12.7;  Size 1.7'x1.2';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 6°

 

24" (11/23/19): at 375x; fairly faint, moderately large, oval 5:3 N-S, 50"x30", broad concentration, slightly brighter round core.

 

24" (12/6/18): at 260x; nearly moderately bright, slightly elongated N-S, 40" diameter, bright core.   Brightest member of the cluster ACO S301 with IC 1859 6.4' W and IC 1858 8' SW.  PGC 10725, situated 2.8' NE of IC 1860, appeared extremely faint and round, 12" diameter.

 

17.5" (12/9/01): faint, fairly small, round, 30" diameter.  Largest and brightest in a trio with IC 1858 8' SW and IC 1859 6.5' WNW in the core of the ACO S301 = Klemola 2 cluster.  A mag 12.3 star is 1.7' NW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1860 = Sw. XI-47, along with IC 1858 and 1859, on 5 Sep 1897.  He reported "pF; pS; lE; 3rd of 3."  His RA is 17 seconds too small. The position was corrected in Robert Baker's 1933 "Catalogue of 985 Extragalactic Nebulae in a Region in Fornax and Eridanus".

******************************

 

IC 1862 = ESO 356-015 = MCG -06-07-010 = FGCE 272 = PGC 10858

02 51 58.8 -33 20 25; For

V = 13.7;  Size 3.0'x0.3';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 3°

 

24" (12/20/17): faint to fairly faint, moderately large, edge-on 5:1 N-S, 1.0'x0.2', brighter central region but no distinct core, overall low surface brightness.  Located 8' NW of mag 8.1 HD 17970.  A mag 10.2 star is 5' NE.  IC 1862 has a similar redshift as ACO S301 = Klemola 2 cluster (brightest member IC 1860), located 2.2° NNW.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1862 = Sw. XI-48 on 25 Nov 1897 and recorded "eeeF; vS; lE; 7m * in field sf; eee diff."  His RA is 41 seconds too small, but a mag 8 star is 8' SSE, matching his description, so this identification is pretty secure.

******************************

 

IC 1864 = ESO 356-017 = MCG -06-07-011 = PGC 10925

02 53 39.3 -34 11 53; For

V = 12.6;  Size 1.2'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.2;  PA = 63°

 

17.5" (12/9/01): faint, small, round, 25" diameter, weak even concentration.  Located 2.8° east of the Fornax Dwarf.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1864 = Sw. XI-49 on 19 Oct 1897 and recorded "eF; S; R."  His RA is 29 seconds too small, but pretty accurate in declination.

******************************

 

IC 1870 = UGCA 46 = KUG 0255-025 = MCG -01-08-020 = PGC 11202

02 57 53.5 -02 20 49; Eri

V = 13.2;  Size 2.8'x1.6';  Surf Br = 14.7;  PA = 133°

 

24" (1/28/17): at 282x; fairly faint, moderately large, elongated NW-SE, ~0.9'x0.5', increases in size with averted vision.  Contains a small brighter core.  Low surface brightness but slightly irregular and patchy.  Situated just 1.7' WSW of mag 7.7 HD 18463, which significantly interferes with the view!  A mag 12 star is 1.6' NNW.

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1870 on 28 Nov 1888 with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  He noted "vF, R, vgbM, v difficult" and made a rough sketch (in his logbook) with the nearby bright star.  Barnard notified Dreyer directly of the discovery.

******************************

 

IC 1871 = LBN 675 = Ced 11 = Sh 2-201

02 57 21 +60 40 18; Cas

Size 4.0'x4.0'

 

See observing notes for IC 1848 = "Soul Nebula"

 

E.E. Barnard discovered IC 1871 photographically at Lick Observatory and communicated the discovery directly to Dreyer.  Barnard's position matches mag 9.4 BD +60d 624 = GSC 4048:1659.  Harold Corwin writes "I think that Barnard got the wrong magnitude 9.3 BD star.  Instead of BD +60d 596 which is surrounded by nebulosity, "chiefly following", he listed the position of BD +60d 624."  Corwin's star is on the eastern side of IC 1848.

******************************

 

IC 1876 = ESO 417-013 = AM 0302-273A = Haro 19 = MCG -05-08-013 = PGC 11577

03 04 32.3 -27 27 38; For

V = 14.1;  Size 1.1'x1.0';  Surf Br = 14.1

 

24" (12/6/18): at 124x and 375x; almost fairly faint, slightly elongated, 30"x25".  A mag 13 star is 1.7' SE.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1876 = Sw. XI-51 on 16 Sep 1896 and logged it as "eeF; vS; R; F * near sf."  His position is 2' SE of ESO 417-13 and the description matches.

******************************

 

IC 1880 = MCG -02-08-049 = PGC 11656

03 06 28.6 -09 43 53; Eri

Size 1.6'x1.1';  PA = 33°

 

24" (12/6/18): at 375x; between faint and fairly faint, slightly elongated SSW-NNE, 0.5'x0.4', small slightly brighter nucleus.  Situated 2' W of a mag 10.4 star. NGC 1214 (= HCG 23A) lies 13' NE and NGC 1208 is 12' NW.

 

Herbert Howe discovered IC 1880 = Ho. III-10 on 30 Dec 1900.  His position was accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1881 = NGC 1213 = UGC 2557 = MCG +06-07-045 = CGCG 524-058 = PGC 11789

03 09 17.3 +38 38 59; Per

V = 14.5;  Size 1.8'x1.4';  Surf Br = 15.4;  PA = 60°

 

See observing notes for NGC 1213.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1881 = B. 253 on 10 Jan 1891, while searching for NGC 1213.  His position matches NGC 1213 = UGC 2557, but Swift's position was off by 0.4 minutes in RA.  As a result Bigourdan misidentified a star as NGC 1213 and thought B.253 was new.  The IC description questions whether IC 1881 = NGC 1213?  It does.

******************************

 

IC 1883 = NGC 1212 = UGC 2560 = PGC 11815

03 09 42.2 +40 53 35; Per

V = 14.5;  Size 0.9'x0.5';  PA = 22°

 

24" (12/20/17): at 375x; fairly faint, small, slightly elongated, 20"x15", faint stellar nucleus.  Located 18' ESE of Algol and 2.7' SW of a mag 8.7 star within AGC 426.  IC 290 lies 4.8' N.

 

18" (11/22/03): faint, small, round, 25" diameter, even surface brightness.  Forms the SW vertex of an equilateral triangle with mag 8.7 SAO 38614 2.7' NE and a mag 11.7 star 2.2' E.  Located just 18' ESE of Algol at the western edge of AGC 426!

 

E.E. Barnard found IC 1883 on on 26 Nov 1888 with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  His discovery was communicated directly to Dreyer and not announced in any of his papers.  This galaxy was discovered earlier by Lewis Swift on 18 Oct 1884 and recorded in his first discovery list as I-5 (later NGC 1212) with the description "S; R; vvF.  Right angled with 2 stars.  In field with Algol".  Swift's position is poor, 40 seconds of RA west of UGC 2560, but his description of the two stars applies to this galaxy.  Barnard and Dreyer assumed this was probably a new object due to Swift's poor position.  So, NGC 1212 = IC 1883, with discovery priority to Swift.

******************************

 

IC 1884 = IC 290 = UGC 2561 = CGCG 540-047 = PGC 11817

03 09 42.7 +40 58 27; Per

V = 14.6;  Size 1.1'x0.2';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 131°

 

24" (12/20/17): at 375x; faint to fairly faint, small, elongated ~5:2 NW-SE, ~25"x10", low nearly even surface brightness.  Located 17' E of Algol and 2.8' NNW of mag 8.7 SAO 38614.  IC 1883 = NGC 1212 is 4.9' S.

 

18" (11/22/03): very faint, very small, appears as a tiny elongated streak, ~25"x8".  Located 5' N of IC 1883 (= NGC 1212) and 2.8' NNW of mag 8.7 SAO 38614 at the west side of AGC 426.  Two mag 12/13 stars lie 50" E and 1.3' NE.

 

E.E. Barnard found IC 1884 on 26 Nov 1888 with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  He communicated the result directly to Dreyer who didn't notice the equivalence with IC 290, discovered by Swift (along with IC 293 and 294) on 11 Sep 1888.  UGC labels the galaxy IC 1884 instead of IC 290. See Harold Corwin's notes.

******************************

 

IC 1886 = MCG -01-09-001 = PGC 11724

03 08 03.2 -04 23 59; Eri

Size 0.8'x0.5';  PA = 0°

 

17.5" (1/7/89): very faint, extremely small, round.  A mag 13.5 star is 0.9' S of center.  Picked up 10' SSW of NGC 1221.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan discovered IC 1886 = Big 254 on 9 Dec 1893,  He noted the mag 13 star to the south.

******************************

 

IC 1887 = IC 292 = UGC 2567 = MCG +07-07-030 = CGCG 540-049 = PGC 11846

03 10 12.9 +40 45 56; Per

V = 13.5;  Size 1.2'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.1;  PA = 75°

 

18" (11/22/03): faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 WSW-ENE, 0.9'x0.4', very weak concentration.  Located 2.4' S of a mag 10 star at the west edge of AGC 426.  NGC 1212 lies 10' NW.

 

E.E. Barnard independently discovered IC 1887, along with IC 1888, on 23 Nov 1888 while sweeping near Algol with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  The discovery was communicated directly to Dreyer.  Lewis Swift discovered this pair just two and half months earlier and reported it in his 8th discovery list (#17).  So, IC 1887 = IC 292.

******************************

 

IC 1888 = IC 293 = MCG +07-07-031 = CGCG 540-053 = LGG 087-006 = PGC 11873

03 10 56.2 +41 08 14; Per

V = 14.0;  Size 0.9'x0.7';  PA = 90°

 

24" (12/20/17): at 375x; faint, small, round, 20" diameter, broad and weak concentration.  Situated in a rich star field 6' SW of mag 8.1 HD 19663 (a wide pair).  This member of AGC 426 lies 14' SSW of NGC 1224, which was the previous target.

 

E.E. Barnard independently discovered IC 1888, along with IC 1887, on 23 Nov 1888 while sweeping near Algol with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  The discovery was communicated directly to Dreyer.  Lewis Swift discovered this pair just two and half months earlier and reported it in his 8th discovery list (#18).  So, IC 1888 = IC 293.

******************************

 

IC 1889 = IC 294 = IC 296 = UGC 2574 = MCG +07-07-033 = LGG 088-012 = PGC 11878

03 11 03.1 +40 37 20; Per

V = 13.8;  Size 1.4'x1.0';  PA = 106°

 

24" (1/1/16): at 375x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 4:3 E-W, 24"x18", weak concentration.  Three similar stars are near; a mag 14.5 star is 0.6' NW, a mag 14 star is 1.4' WNW and another mag 14 star is 1.1' WSW.  IC 292 lies 13' NW.

 

E.E. Barnard independently discovered IC 1889, along with IC 1887 (= IC 292) and IC 1888 (= IC 293), on 23 Nov 1888 while sweeping near Algol with the 12-inch refractor at Lick Observatory.  The discovery was communicated directly to Dreyer.  Lewis Swift discovered this pair just two and half months earlier on 11 Sep 1888 and reported it in his 8th discovery list as #19 (later IC 294) and again three nights later as #21 (later IC 296).  So, IC 1887 = IC 294 = IC 296.

******************************

 

IC 1892 = Arp 332 NED4 = Arp 332 NED5 = VV 260a = VV 260b = ESO 480-036 = MCG -04-08-030 = UGCA 55 = PGC 11750

03 08 27.8 -23 03 16; Eri

V = 13.2;  Size 1.9'x1.0';  Surf Br = 13.8;  PA = 2°

 

17.5" (11/10/96): extremely faint, moderately large, very low surface brightness, no concentration, probably elongated ~N-S.  Initially suspected while viewing the NGC 1228 group and confirmed using John Vickers' CCD Atlas.  Located  8.6' SSE of NGC 1228 and 6.7' SE of NGC 1229. This galaxy is the largest in the group, but is fairly difficult, though according to its recessional velocity IC 1892 is superimposed in the front of the group.

 

Herbert Howe discovered IC 1892 = Ho III-11 on 22 Jan 1899 and noted "vF, L; near [NGC] 1230."  His micrometric position is very accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1895 = ESO 481-001 = AM 0307-252 = MCG -04-08-033 = PGC 11807

03 09 36.2 -25 15 13; For

V = 13.3;  Size 1.5'x1.1';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 164°

 

24" (12/6/18): at 260x; almost moderately bright, fairly small, round, very small bright core with a 25"-30" halo.  Two 12th magnitudes stars are nearby at 0.9' SW and 1.6' NW, with the stars oriented directly N-S.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1895 = Sw. XI-52 on 8 Oct 1896 and reported "eeF; pS; 2 st in meridian [N-S] close p[receding]."  His position is 4.5' too far south and 7 seconds of RA too far west, but the identification is certain based on his comment on the two nearby stars (12th magnitude).  The declination was corrected in Robert Baker's 1933 "Catalogue of 985 Extragalactic Nebulae in a Region in Fornax and Eridanus", based on photographs taken with the Bruce astrograph in South Africa.

******************************

 

IC 1897 = MCG -02-09-009 = PGC 11866

03 10 45.9 -10 47 46; Eri

V = 14.3;  Size 0.6'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.0

 

17.5" (12/28/94): faint, small, round, weak concentration.  A mag 13 star is 1.5' S.  Forms a pair with brighter NGC 1238 3.3' NE.

 

Herbert Howe discovered IC 1897 = Ho III-12 on 24 Jan 1900 with the 20-inch refractor at the Chamberlin Observatory.  He noted "eF, vS; near [NGC] 1238" and his micrometric position is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1898 = UGCA 56 = ESO 481-002 = MCG -04-08-036 = PGC 11851

03 10 19.8 -22 24 17; Eri

V = 12.9;  Size 3.6'x0.6';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 73°

 

24" (12/6/18): at 124x and 260x; faint, fairly large, very thin edge-on,~1.5'x0.2', low surface brightness (partly due to its low elevation)

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1898 = D.S. 170 on an plate taken at Harvard's Arequipa station in 1899.

******************************

 

IC 1899 = ESO 481-008 = MCG -04-08-041 = PGC 11930

03 12 13.1 -25 18 18; For

Size 1.3'x0.3';  PA = 162°

 

24" (12/6/18): at 260x; fairly faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 NNW-SSE, 35"x15", nearly even surface brightness.  A mag 15.5 star is 45" E of center. IC 1899 is the brightest in a small group (USGC S118) with 5 members at z = .021.

 

UGCA 61, located 21' NE, appeared faint, moderately large, elongated ~2:1 N-S or NNW-SSE,~50"x25", very low surface brightness, probably mostly viewed the brighter central section (bar).

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1899 = Sw. XI-53 on 22 Dec 1897 and reported "eeF; S; R; 2 faint st near [south-preceding] point to it."  His reported RA was 23 seconds too far west, but the identification is certain based on his comment on the two collinear stars to the southwest.  The RA was corrected in Robert Baker's 1933 "Catalogue of 985 Extragalactic Nebulae in a Region in Fornax and Eridanus", based on photographs taken with the Bruce astrograph in South Africa.

******************************

 

IC 1900 = MCG +06-08-007 = CGCG 525-013 = KTG 10A = PGC 12124

03 15 55.2 +37 09 15; Per

V = 13.9;  Size 0.6'x0.4';  PA = 92°

 

24" (2/5/13): brightest and first in the trio of IC galaxies.  At 375x appeared fairly faint, small, elongated 4:3 E-W, 24"x18", increases to a small bright core and stellar nucleus.

 

24" (1/12/13): brightest in a trio (KTG 10) with IC 1901 2.9' SSE and IC 1902 3.7' NE.  At 375x appeared faint to fairly faint, very small, elongated 3:2 E-W, ~20"x14", very small brighter nucleus.  Located 2.9' ESE of a mag 11.3 star.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1900 = J. 3-973, along with IC 1901 and 1902, on 18 Jan 1898.  He reported "F, nearly R, 30", gbM, 14 mag stellar ncl."

******************************

 

IC 1901 = MCG +06-08-008 = CGCG 525-014 = KTG 10B = PGC 12136

03 16 02.6 +37 06 45; Per

Size 0.7'x0.2';  PA = 164°

 

24" (2/5/13): second brightest in the KTG 10 trio (differing opinion than last month) with IC 1900 and IC 1902.  At 375x appeared fairly faint, small, elongated 24"x15" N-S, sharply concentrated with a bright quasi-stellar nucleus and very faint extensions.  Located 2.9' SSE of IC 1900 and 2.4' ENE of a mag 10.3 star.

 

24" (1/12/13): faintest member of the KTG 10 trio with IC 1900 2.9' NNW and IC 1902 4.4' NNE.  At 375x appeared faint, very small, elongated 2:1 ~N-S, 15"x8" (core region viewed), brighter nucleus.  The galaxy has a similar surface brightness as IC 1900, but is smaller.  A 1.2' pair of  mag 10.3/11 stars lies ~3' WSW.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1901 = J. 3-974, along with IC 1900 and 1902, on 18 Jan 1898.  He reported "F, R, 20" to 30", similar to IC 1900."

******************************

 

IC 1902 = CGCG 525-015 = KTG 10C = PGC 12150

03 16 12.4 +37 10 39; Per

Size 0.5'x0.3';  PA = 67°

 

24" (2/5/13): faintest in the KTG 10 trio with IC 1900 and IC 1901.  At 375x appeared faint to fairly faint, small, round, 12"-15" diameter, contains a stellar nucleus.  Located 3.7' NE of IC 1900.

 

24" (1/12/13): faint to fairly faint, very small, 15", moderately high even surface brightness except for a faint nearly stellar nucleus.  Furthest northeast in the KTG 10 trio with IC 1900 and IC 1901.

 

Stephane Javelle discovered IC 1902 = J. 3-975, along with IC 1900 and 1901, on 18 Jan 1898.

******************************

 

IC 1907 = NGC 1278 = UGC 2670 = MCG +07-07-065 = CGCG 540-105 = PGC 12438

03 19 54.1 +41 33 48; Per

V = 12.4;  Size 1.5'x1.3';  Surf Br = 13.2

 

See observing notes for NGC 1278.

 

24" (2/13/18): CGCG 540-101, which is misidentified as IC 1907 in RC3 and PGC, appeared fairly faint, fairly small, round, 25" diameter.

 

Guillaume Bigourdan found IC 1907 = Big. 375 on 22 Oct 1884 and reported it in his 4th Comptes Rendus list.  His position matches NGC 1278, discovered by d'Arrest on 14 Feb 1863.   See notes on NGC 1275 for more on the confusion of NGC 1275 and 1278.

******************************

 

IC 1913 = ESO 357-016 = AM 0317-323 = MCG -05-0-027 = LGG 096-001 = PGC 12404

03 19 34.5 -32 27 54; For

V = 13.8;  Size 1.9'x0.25';  PA = 149°

 

24" (11/23/19): at 260x; extremely faint, moderately large, thin ghostly streak NW-SE, ~60"x10".  Only glimpsed with effort but repeatable in the same position and orientation.  Collinear with mag 14.8 5' NW and mag 11.7 7' NW.  IC 1913 is an outlying member of the Fornax I cluster, ~5° NW of the center of the cluster.

 

Delisle Stewart discovered IC 1913 = D.S. 178 in 1899 on a plate taken at Harvard's Arequipa station.

******************************

 

IC 1919 = ESO 358-001 = AM 0324-330 = MCG -06-08-015 = LGG 096-002 = PGC 12825

03 26 02.2 -32 53 40; For

V = 12.8;  Size 1.6'x1.2';  Surf Br = 13.4;  PA = 84°

 

24" (1/1/19): at 260x; either faint or fairly faint, slightly elongated, ~0.6'x0.5', nearly even surface brightness (fairly low).  A mag 15 star is 1.6' SE.  A mag 10 star is 5' NNW; this is the brightest and closest of 8 brighter stars scattered to the north.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1919 = Sw. XI-54 on 25 Nov 1897 and recorded "eeF; pS; lE; 7 or 8 pB st[ars] n[orth] like letter V."  His RA is 37 seconds too far west, but the distinctive star field verifies the identification.  He first reported the object in his 5th discovery list at Lowe Observatory and his RA was off by 10 minutes (too small).  Dreyer noted the discrepancy and queried if the RA was wrong in the IC2 (it wasn't, except for the 37 second error).

******************************

 

IC 1943 = NGC 1411 = ESO 249-011 = MCG -07-08-004 = PGC 13429

03 38 44.9 -44 06 02; Hor

V = 11.3;  Size 2.3'x1.7';  Surf Br = 12.6;  PA = 6°

 

See observing notes for NGC 1411.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1943 = Sw. XI-55 on 3 Oct 1897 and recorded "pB, S, R".  There is nothing near his position but Harold Corwin suggests Swift may have made a 10 minute error in RA.  If so, then IC 1943 = NGC 1411.  The dec matches and the description is appropriate. Swift made a similar error of 10 minutes in RA for four objects discovered on 1 Sep 1888; IC 895, IC 1028, IC 1045 and IC 511. See Corwin's notes for IC 1943.

******************************

 

IC 1947 = ESO 200-030 = Rose 37 = PGC 13027

03 30 32.8 -50 20 19; Hor

V = 14.8;  Size 0.5'x0.4';  Surf Br = 13.0;  PA = 131°

 

24" (4/5/08 - Magellan Observatory, Australia): IC 1947 is a faint companion to NGC 1356, located just 2.2' SW of the much brighter galaxy.  At 260x it appeared faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 NW-SE, ~0.5'x0.25'.  Forms the west vertex of a small triangle with a mag 12.7 star 1' NE and a mag 11.7 star 1.3' SSE.

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1947 = DS 206 from a plate taken on 14 Oct 1898 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.

******************************

 

IC 1953 = UGCA 78 = ESO 548-038 = MCG -04-09-026 = LGG 097-021 = PGC 13184

03 33 41.9 -21 28 43; Eri

V = 11.7;  Size 2.8'x2.1';  Surf Br = 13.5;  PA = 121°

 

24" (11/23/19): at 375x; moderately bright, large, slightly elongated, 1.5'-2' diameter, small brighter core seemed offset north of the center.  At times a brighter "spine" or central bar was visible extending in a N-S orientation.  The surface brightness was fairly low and irregular with a patchy appearance.  This galaxy is situated just 9' N of 4.3 magnitude Tau 5 Eri and it helped to place the star outside the field.

 

ESO 548-036, 6.1' SSW, was fairly faint (quite easy), elongated 5:2 ~N-S, ~40"x16", small bright core.   A mag 12.7 star is 1.4' N.  This galaxy is situated just 6' NW of the mag 4.3 star!

 

13.1" (10/10/86): fairly faint, very large, diffuse, oval WNW-ESE, weak concentration.  Located 9' N of the bright star Tau 5 Eridani (V = 4.3) that detracts from viewing.  Member of the NGC 1332 group?

 

DeLisle Stewart discovered IC 1953 = DS 213 from a plate taken in 1899 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.  He reported "vF, cL, spir or ring neb."  Based on photographs taken at the Helwan observatory in 1927-31, IC 1953 was described as "F, R, 2' dia, spiral with a pF ncl, vlE [bar] 160°, [spiral arms] showing condensations and absoprtion on the preceding side."  ESO 548-040, 2.6' NW of IC 1953, was also reported as new.

******************************

 

IC 1954 = ESO 200-036 = LGG 093-002 = PGC 13090

03 31 31.4 -51 54 17; Hor

V = 11.6;  Size 3.2'x1.5';  Surf Br = 13.2;  PA = 66°

 

24" (4/5/08 - Magellan Observatory, Australia): at 260x this was a surprisingly bright and detailed IC galaxy that was missed by John Herschel!  Appears elongated ~2:1 WSW-ENE, ~2.8'x1.4' with a broad concentration to a large, brighter core.  With direct vision a small brighter nucleus was visible at the center.  There was a strong impression of spiral structure with slightly enhanced arcs (probably portions of spiral arms) extending east of the core on the south side and west of the core on the north side (this is consistent with images of the galaxy).

 

Robert Innes discovered IC 1954 in 1898 with the 7-inch Merz refractor at the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope.  His discovery position in MN, 59, p339 is 12 seconds of RA too large.  DeLisle Stewart also found this galaxy on a plate taken on 14 Oct 1898 at Harvard's Arequipa Station.

******************************

 

IC 1963 = IC 335 = ESO 358-026 = MCG -06-08-031 = LGG 094-008 = PGC 13277

03 35 31.0 -34 26 49; For

V = 11.9;  Size 2.6'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.3;  PA = 84°

 

18" (1/21/04): fairly faint, moderately large, very elongated ~E-W, 1.5'x0.4', slightly brighter core, tapering extensions (spindle-shaped).  Located 7.5' E of a mag 11.5 star.  This is one of the brighter non-NGC galaxies in the Fornax I cluster.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1963 = Sw. XI-56 on 7 Sep 1897 (given as 27 Sep in his fourth discovery list from Lowe Observatory) and logged "pB; S; eeeE; a hair line 90°.  See note."  The note mentions "these [along with IC 2135] are the most interesting nebulae I have ever seen, especially No. 56 [IC 1963], which is a nebulous hair-line of one uniform size from end to end."  His second position was 37 seconds of RA too far west, but the description matches IC 335, which Swift discovered 10 years earlier.

******************************

 

IC 1970 = ESO 249-007 = MCG -07-08-003 = AM 0334-440 = LGG 102-001 = PGC 13322

03 36 31.5 -43 57 25; Hor

V = 12.1;  Size 3.2'x0.7';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 75°

 

24" (11/18/12 - Magellan Observatory, Australia): fairly bright, fairly large, thin edge-on ~5:1 WSW-ENE, 2.0'x0.4', with a slightly brighter, bulging core.  Located 25' WNW of NGC 1411.  Member of the NGC 1433 subgroup of the Dorado Group complex.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1970 = Sw. XI-57) on 17 Nov 1897 and recorded "eeeF; vS; eeE; a ray, 90°; B * following."  His position is 7' too far west-southwest, but the identification is certain based on the description.  DeLisle Stewart measured an accurate position using an Arequipa plate taken in 1901 and noted "eF, vS, eE at 75°."  Stewart's position angle is accurate.

******************************

 

IC 1981 = NGC 1412 = ESO 482-029 = MCG -05-09-021 = PGC 13520

03 40 29.3 -26 51 44; For

V = 12.5;  Size 1.9'x0.8';  Surf Br = 12.8;  PA = 131°

 

17.5" (1/12/02): moderately bright, moderately large, elongated nearly 2:1 NW-SE, 1.3'x0.7', bright core.  Situated in a group of three mag 11/12 stars with a mag 12 star 1.6' SE.  Located 38' SE of NGC 1398 in northeast Fornax.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1981 = Sw. XI-58 on 26 Dec 1897 at Echo Mountain in the San Gabriel mountains and recorded "eF, eS, lE, * close nf".  His position is 37 seconds of RA west of ESO 482-029 = PGC 13520, though the identification is certain.  The correct RA was reported in Robert Baker's 1933 "Catalogue of 985 Extragalactic Nebulae in a Region in Fornax and Eridanus".  This galaxy was probably discovered by John Herschel in 1835, but his position for NGC 1412 = h2574 was 40' too far north (either a recording or copying error).  So, NGC 1412 = IC 1981, both with poor positions.

 

Both NGC 1412 and IC 1981 were reported as not found in 1935 at the Helwan observatory on plates taken in 1927-31 (Bulletin 38).  ESO and MCG use only the IC designation but both designations are given in NED, HyperLeda and SIMBAD.  Included in my RNGC Corrections #6 and Corwin's notes.

******************************

 

IC 1983 = NGC 1415 = ESO 482-033 = MCG -04-09-047 = PGC 13544

03 40 56.8 -22 33 50; Eri

V = 11.9;  Size 3.5'x1.8';  Surf Br = 13.7;  PA = 148°

 

See observing notes for NGC 1415.

 

Lewis Swift found IC 1983 = Sw. XI-59 on 8 Oct 1896 from Echo Mountain in Southern California and recorded "vF; pS; R; not [NGC] 1426."  His position is 3.4' SE of NGC 1415, the most likely galaxy he picked up according to Harold Corwin.  See his identification notes on IC 1983.

******************************

 

IC 1985 = IC 348 = Cr 41 = OCL-409 = vdB 19 = LBN 758 = Ced 20

03 44 36 +32 10; Per

V = 7.3;  Size 10'x10'

 

17.5" (12/16/95): IC 348 is an unusual object consisting of a scattered group of stars with associated nebulosity situated near a large dark cloud virtually devoid of stars.  The cluster consists of 15 stars of varying magnitudes in a 6' group located 5'-10' S of Omicron = 38 Persei (V = 3.8).  The brightest star in the group is mag 8.4 SAO 56680, which has two nearby companions and the group is clearly encased in a fairly bright reflection nebula, ~3' diameter.  The star at the southwest end of the cluster is a nice close evenly matched double (∑437 = 9.8/10 at 11").  The immediate 50' low power field to the south is strangely devoid of almost all stars! (Barnard 3 and 4).  Omicron also has a halo but this appears to be scattered light.

 

E.E. Barnard found IC 1985 on a plate taken 6 Dec 1893 at Lick Observatory.  The IC position matches the brightest star in the IC 348 cluster. So, IC 1985 = IC 348.

******************************

 

IC 1993 = ESO 358-065 = MCG -06-09-032 = AM 0345-335 = PGC 13840

03 47 04.8 -33 42 36; For

V = 11.7;  Size 2.5'x2.1';  Surf Br = 13.3;  PA = 56°

 

18" (1/21/04): fairly faint, fairly large, low surface brightness glow with just a very weak concentration, slightly elongated ~N-S, roughly 2.0'x1.7'.  Located just 1.5' ESE of mag 9.3 SAO 194528!  Outlying member of the Fornax I cluster on the northeast side.

 

Lewis Swift discovered IC 1993 = Sw. XI-62 on 19 Nov 1897 and logged "eF; L; cE; 7 1/2m in contact; ee diff."  In his Astronoical Journal list (15th object is the 5th discovery list from Lowe Observatory), Swift mentions the star "nearly obliterates it" and has a note "it seems strange, although in close contact if not partly superimposed on the star, that it was not found long ago.  I think it would, could it be detached from the star, be quite an interesting one.

******************************